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jclary
10-03-2017, 09:56 PM
Silly question. I have my own answer, but wondering if anyone besides me has given it any thought? What is the least worked/stressed bushing/bearing in any Studebaker's drive train? From the engine front, to the rear wheels, what is the bearing, or bushing least likely to suffer failure, or wear?

I have no urgent need of an answer, but while looking over some parts a while back, the thought crossed my mind. Thought it might be a fun question to throw out to the forum.;)

I'm posting this and going to bed. Have an early motorcycle appointment in the morning. Will check in if I get up early enough.

raoul5788
10-03-2017, 10:11 PM
I'll throw out the first guess. My SWAG, the rear cam bearing.

tsenecal
10-03-2017, 10:20 PM
Maybe the throw out bearing? It only turns while the clutch is in.

harry
10-03-2017, 10:34 PM
Maybe the throw out bearing? It only turns while the clutch is in.

Windshield wiper motor?

Radio knob bushing?

Scott
10-03-2017, 11:07 PM
In the drivetrain it could be the bushing that supports the back end of the torque converter.

thunderations
10-03-2017, 11:14 PM
Muffler bearing?

DieselJim
10-04-2017, 05:04 AM
Water pump.

tbredehoft
10-04-2017, 07:45 AM
Left rear door hinge.

8E45E
10-04-2017, 07:50 AM
Arguably, the needle bearings in the U-joints.

The reason I'll say 'arguably', is it varies from one car to the next. One driven daily on level pavement will have had far less planar movement than one driven on a bumpy, gravel road.

Craig

Mike Van Veghten
10-04-2017, 07:51 AM
All of the above, as answered bushings/bearings (in the "drive train") are worked...very similar.
What counts for this questionnaire, RPM or load ? Two VERY different things.

As a combination of the two (RPM & load), I'd say the second to the last (last has more distributor gear loading) cam bearing.
Another one might be the speedometer gear inside the transmission. RPM is low, load is low.

Mike

Son O Lark
10-04-2017, 08:25 AM
Hood latch bushing.

JoeHall
10-04-2017, 09:19 AM
Pilot bearing

jrlemke
10-04-2017, 10:30 AM
I agree with Joe, pilot bearing or bushing! -Jim

jclary
10-04-2017, 04:56 PM
Pilot bearing

THAT'S IT!!! :cheers:

That's what got me to wondering. While I have never heard of anyone claiming to replace a "cam" bearing that failed (without associated failures), I certainly have never heard of a vehicle having to go into a shop "only" to have a plot bearing replaced. Some of you "REAL" mechanics might have a more educated opinion, but my thinking is the pilot bearings are more of a "guide" than an actual load bearing support. Also, it operates at the same rotating speed as it's mating components, Technically, it has a tolerance of fit, that provides clearance. When having a pilot shaft exposed, I always place a small film of lube on it, but not much. I've separated transmissions from flywheels many times and found them bone dry with no adverse wear or friction burns.

I replaced one in a Mazda RX7 rotary engine years ago, but that was when I replaced the clutch/pressure plate assembly. Following manual instructions, (since this was my first and only time on this kind of engine) I did it 'cause it was included in the instructions. After buying a pilot bearing removal tool, I was able to get that blasted thing out. It looked as good as the new one. If I had another job like that, I probably wouldn't replace it. Sometimes, I think these factory manuals include stuff to help mechanics "pad" the repair bills.;)

Lou Van Anne
10-04-2017, 09:32 PM
Muffler bearing?
They were belt driven...right?

lumpy
10-04-2017, 10:00 PM
Not buying it. In all my years of working of working on cars , trucks hot rods , etc. I have come across totally wasted pilot bushings - bearings. usually rears it's head with severe clutch chatter. In one case I came across a bushing that was too tight on the input shaft , and the car would grind gears upon shifting.

lumpy
10-05-2017, 09:34 PM
Damn . I hate getting distracted in the middle of typing...Hunt and peck ..hunt and peck:o

thunderations
10-05-2017, 10:12 PM
Yes, and pretty rare because they were only optioned if you got the high compression hub caps too.

They were belt driven...right?

jclary
10-05-2017, 10:39 PM
With all that has transpired this week, I think a little whimsical distraction is not so bad.;) As far as finding a "trashed" pilot bearing, I know it happens, but usually secondary to other problems. I can't imagine a situation where a properly installed pilot bearing would fail unless there was a bad transmission shaft, abused clutch, or specifically with a Studebaker...a very bad miss on the bell housing dial in procedure.

Thanks for the input though...even the muffler bearing suggestion. Although, when I was in the Air Force, we would send the guys fresh out of tech school, to the parts counter after a "square" muffler bearing along with instructions to check out the "skyhook tool" required to install it.;)

1954khardtop
10-06-2017, 08:54 AM
John,
Did you remember to tell them to get a bucket of steam to help with the installation?
A person driving in traffic all day with a foot on the clutch at stoplights will see more wear on the pilot bushing than one driving in high gear for long stretches.

Buzzard
10-06-2017, 11:32 AM
Hi John, now I have to chime in.
Vehicle: 1996 Dodge Ram 3500, 4x4 duallie, V-10, stick. Ordered new so I am the only owner/operator and no one but me has worked on it.
A number of years ago (all original at this time with very low miles, still about only 75,000 now) and suddenly, the hydraulic clutch would sometimes work as normal, other times, no clutch whatsoever. It wasn't a real problem for me as I can shift with no clutch but it was an annoyance as you never knew when it was going to work normally or refuse to operate at all. It made starting off at intersections interesting when it wouldn't release at all.
I bled the system, checked everything and all seemed normal so I called Red McCloud at McCloud Clutch and explained the situation. He too was baffled as he stated "they work or they don't". I put up with it for quite some time as you can see by the low mileage, it rarely gets used unless I have something big & heavy to haul.
When we finally pulled the transmission (NV4500HD) expecting to replace the slave, guess what we found? Yup, a compromised pilot bearing which was slightly off center in the crank so sometimes it all lined up and worked as designed, other times hanging the disc so it would not stop, hence a "no clutch situation". I called Red back and this was the first he'd heard of. It was at this time original from the factory with never having been touched.
So you never know what peculiarities can occur. Remember the old adage, "if it's got tires or skirts, you are going to have trouble with it".
Bill

JoeHall
10-06-2017, 01:45 PM
Hi John, now I have to chime in.
Vehicle: 1996 Dodge Ram 3500, 4x4 duallie, V-10, stick. Ordered new so I am the only owner/operator and no one but me has worked on it.
A number of years ago (all original at this time with very low miles, still about only 75,000 now) and suddenly, the hydraulic clutch would sometimes work as normal, other times, no clutch whatsoever. It wasn't a real problem for me as I can shift with no clutch but it was an annoyance as you never knew when it was going to work normally or refuse to operate at all. It made starting off at intersections interesting when it wouldn't release at all.
I bled the system, checked everything and all seemed normal so I called Red McCloud at McCloud Clutch and explained the situation. He too was baffled as he stated "they work or they don't". I put up with it for quite some time as you can see by the low mileage, it rarely gets used unless I have something big & heavy to haul.
When we finally pulled the transmission (NV4500HD) expecting to replace the slave, guess what we found? Yup, a compromised pilot bearing which was slightly off center in the crank so sometimes it all lined up and worked as designed, other times hanging the disc so it would not stop, hence a "no clutch situation". I called Red back and this was the first he'd heard of. It was at this time original from the factory with never having been touched.
So you never know what peculiarities can occur. Remember the old adage, "if it's got tires or skirts, you are going to have trouble with it".
Bill

Re: the OP, defective bearings, improperly fitted bearings, out of align transmission & engine shafts, etc., do not count. :D

mapman
10-06-2017, 03:12 PM
I will say that of all the cars I've worked on I have never had a pilot bearing go out although I have seen a number of cracked and broken flex plates on those FOMs.
Rob:rolleyes:

lumpy
10-06-2017, 09:06 PM
Then why do all reman clutch packages include new pilot bushings ?