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Thread: Silver Hawk Major Modifications

  1. #41
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    On a side note, we took our daughter to numerous new car dealers. My wife was determined to get my daughter to like/love a new car. My daughter drove some very nice cars with wi-fi, GPS TV monitors, heated seats, back up cameras, etc, etc. After driving all these nice "new" cars she said, "all the cars drove really good and have some very nice features but I'd rather have a 59 Silver Hawk!!" . My daughter is 15 and we pretty much gave her a choice of any car at any dealership. My wife didn't want her to have an old car, mostly for safety/repairability reasons. My daughter would say, "But Mom....the older cars are built much better and the older cars hold up much better in a car crash!!". When my wife finally gave in she specified what the "old" car had to have so my daughter could drive it. To tell you the truth, if there was some way to install air bags (in the cab for safety) my wife would have me do it. I looked at many modern steering wheels with air bags but my daughter loves the original steering wheel and won't let me put a newer looking wheel in the car, even the grant steering wheels don't have have that "old school" look like the original wheel.
    You gotta do what you gotta do!!!
    Treblig

  2. #42
    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
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    Treblig There's a lot more to a air bag system than just a bag of air that goes off in your face. It would be pretty hard to make up a system that would work in a older car.

  3. #43
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    The fact that you have a fifteen year old daughter, my guess is that you are somewhat younger then the average Studebaker owner. Since you didn't answer my question about previous Studebaker ownership, I assume that the answer would have been no. Since you spoke of wanting an old car for you daughter in a generic way without mention of make, may I ask what your choice of an old car would have been for your daughter's first car?-Bill

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallabutt View Post
    The fact that you have a fifteen year old daughter, my guess is that you are somewhat younger then the average Studebaker owner. Since you didn't answer my question about previous Studebaker ownership, I assume that the answer would have been no. Since you spoke of wanting an old car for you daughter in a generic way without mention of make, may I ask what your choice of an old car would have been for your daughter's first car?-Bill
    Sorry Bill, I've been so busy that sometimes it's difficult to keep up with everything. I was born in 1951, so I ain't no spring chicken. Yes, this is my first Studebaker. I had no car in mind because my daughter has always wanted a 57 Chevy, she's wanted a 57 Chevy for many years. My daughter is not one of those wishy washy girls, she knows what she wants and she has no doubt about her decisions. I guess that's a good thing. I had her drive a 57 Chevy here in town, it was nice and they wanted 31K for it. It wasn't perfect but it was nice. I had given my daughter an "Encyclopedia of American Cars", you know one of the really thick books with tons of color pics and descriptions of every car made from the 1920s to the 80s. I asked her to go through the book in her spare time and put a sticky next to the cars she liked. I already knew that she didn't want a new car, she just didn't want one. Well one of the cars on the top of her list was the Silver Hawk (it also has tail fins). So I figured why not. To me it didn't matter too much because there's nothing I can't modify or make/manufacture. She also wanted "Christine"!!! You know, from the movie. But that car was way too long/big for her to drive around school. As much as I would have loved Christine I didn't want to burden her with a gigantic car. It had to have fins and it couldn't be too big so the Silver Hawk seemed to meet all the requirements.
    My daughter is on track to graduate from the 12th grade with a College Associates Degree. So she's doing her part. She's only 15 but she's taking 3 College courses this summer. In fact she'll only be 17 years old when she gets her Associates Degree.

    Treblig

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5brown1 View Post
    What vehicle are the seats from?
    2002 Chevy Pick Up.

    Treblig

  6. #46
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    Not one good "Studebaker" mechanic? What's that?? If you can't fix a Stude--you're not a mechanic!! If you can't fix them, you sure can't fix a Chebby !! Just my experience--a mechanic should be able to fix and work on anything, there is certainly no special quirks on a Studebaker, just "old" engineering. Granted some parts may be harder to find quickly and your local parts store won't have a listing, that's why we're here!!!!

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by karterfred88 View Post

    Not one good "Studebaker" mechanic? What's that?? If you can't fix a Stude--you're not a mechanic!! If you can't fix them, you sure can't fix a Chebby !! Just my experience--a mechanic should be able to fix and work on anything, there is certainly no special quirks on a Studebaker, just "old" engineering. Granted some parts may be harder to find quickly and your local parts store won't have a listing, that's why we're here!!!!

    I'm a professional machinist and simply a back yard mechanic. Yes, I can fix any car (been working on cars since I was 14) but if you've read all my previous posts you know that I have no plans to live forever. When I am enjoying my "eternal dirt nap" I can sleep soundly knowing that my daughter can take her car down to the local Exxon or Firestone and get her car fixed easily and parts will be readily available. Now if I could live forever I would leave the Silver Hawk completely stock with maybe a disc brake conversion and stock power steering. I would overhaul the front end and replace the seals in the steering box (sector). My wife didn't want my daughter going off to some university somewhere and not be able to take the car to any mechanic to get it fixed and honestly, neither would I.

    Treblig

  8. #48
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    You shouldn't feel the need to defend yourself. Come on guys.. Be a little more welcoming and supportive!!

    There's always the constant "How do we get new/younger members?" question being asked. Here we have a new, young Studebaker enthusiast who's dad is building her the car she wants to the specs that meet their needs.

    Keep it up the good work and thanks for posting.

  9. #49
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    Today's Goodies

    I plan to install power brakes so the batteryDSC04493.JPGDSC04494.JPGDSC04495.JPGDSC04496.JPGDSC04497.JPG has to move to the truck so today I ran a heavy cable from the front to the back along the inside frame:

    In Texas a front license plate is required so i custom made a heavy duty bracket to hold a 40s/50s license plate holder on the front bumper.

    DSC04503.JPGDSC04504.JPGDSC04501.JPGDSC04500.JPGDSC04507.JPG

    Treblig

  10. #50
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallabutt View Post
    Treblig,

    It really sounds like you have focused on change for it's own sake...
    I don't think he has (read the whole thread), but in any case "change for change sake" is actually allowed in the car hobby. Folks have been doing just that since...well since there were cars .

    What Treblig is building may not be what YOU'D do, but I doubt if that was part of his decision making process.

    To me, it sounds like a well planned out, well financed build being done by a skilled mechanic/fabricator/car guy. I don't pop in here often, but I will follow this thread. It is like "the old days" of the forum where guys posted their projects, kept us up to date on progress, and asked for help when needed. It is what the hobby is all about (IMHO).
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA


  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
    It is like "the old days" of the forum where guys posted their projects, kept us up to date on progress, and asked for help when needed. It is what the hobby is all about (IMHO).
    Well said Dick and you too Matt. Bob
    , ,

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
    I don't think he has (read the whole thread), but in any case "change for change sake" is actually allowed in the car hobby. Folks have been doing just that since...well since there were cars .

    What Treblig is building may not be what YOU'D do, but I doubt if that was part of his decision making process.

    To me, it sounds like a well planned out, well financed build being done by a skilled mechanic/fabricator/car guy. I don't pop in here often, but I will follow this thread. It is like "the old days" of the forum where guys posted their projects, kept us up to date on progress, and asked for help when needed. It is what the hobby is all about (IMHO).
    Thanks you so much for your statement Dick....One of the main reasons I joined this web site was that I knew what I was going to do and "thought" it would be nice for me to document everything I did to make it easier for the next Studebaker enthusiast. I've never been one of those guys who attempts to make something all original. I mean, those all original cars are very nice and they are usually beautiful but I love a challenge and I enjoy doing something that is not easy. When I worked in the machine shop manufacturing aircraft parts I was the one who picked the most difficult things to make because that's the only way I felt challenged. This is not "change for change sake ", this is change, because in this case, it is necessary. It just so happens that I enjoy it!!
    Of course the other BIG reason I joined this web site is for information. I never claimed to know everything, although I did claim that there was nothing I couldn't make or manufacture. I couldn't build a nuclear reactor but I have assembled and tested Atomic bombs many times. Dick you are correct about one thing, I'm still living in the "old days"...having a vision and building toward that vision. I don't mind some folks here asking/telling me to NOT do this or NOT do that, I understand that there are purists out there who see no reason to change anything. For me, it's no fun at all if I don't change something. Even my all original '69 Barracuda!! I've installed a 2004R overdrive and it improved the car 1000 percent. On the Mopar website I had more than one person tell me to leave the car original. Of course I didn't listen and I really love /enjoy the car a lot more now!!

    DSC04255.JPGDSC04274.JPG

    thanks again,
    PS - I will not be deterred, the more someone tells me I shouldn't the more I am inclined to do it!!!
    Treblig

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetolbob View Post
    Well said Dick and you too Matt. Bob

    Thanks to you too Bob!!! It makes me happy to know there are others out there who understand and/or appreciate that I have a purpose. I received the universal brake pedal system/booster/master cylinder and will post pics soon!! My son's '46 Chevy before and after. When I got the '46 it was an empty shell (body only) on a frame.

    DSC04486.JPGDSC01074.jpgDSC01077.jpgDSC01078.jpgDSC04248.JPG

    Treblig

  14. #54
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    You didn't show the ends on the battery cable.
    The best ends to use are mechanically crimped using a specialized crimp tool. Makes a connection that provides the best conductivity.
    Some use a terminal that's soldered to the cable but there are disadvantages to them.
    Brass battery terminals with external heat shrink tubing over the cable and terminal connection.
    It has a sealing compound that seals against moisture and acid corrosion.
    South Lompoc Studebaker

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    Thanks to you too Bob!!! It makes me happy to know there are others out there who understand and/or appreciate that I have a purpose. I received the universal brake pedal system/booster/master cylinder and will post pics soon!! My son's '46 Chevy before and after. When I got the '46 it was an empty shell (body only) on a frame.

    DSC04486.JPGDSC01074.jpgDSC01077.jpgDSC01078.jpgDSC04248.JPG

    Treblig
    Interesting that the stock chevy frame used the same construction as a Stude.
    I wonder when chevy stopped using that construction style ?
    Last edited by 55 56 PREZ 4D; 04-30-2015 at 02:11 AM.
    South Lompoc Studebaker

  16. #56
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    Hey Treblig, Great looking project. I've been a Studebaker driver for many decades. Almost all of the Studes I've driven for any duration during that time have been Stude powered. But I gotta tell ya, I'm am right now, getting ready to go to Chevy LS power for my beloved 54 Coupe. Its had Stude power since I bought the car in 1971. But its time for me to try something new. We're gonna use a 6.0 with a Z06 cam backed up with a T56 6 speed. I'm getting excited just thinkin about it.
    I admire your efforts for your daughter. Good going. And keep up the good work.
    sals54

  17. #57
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    You SHOULDN'T need to defend yourself. No one should harsh your mellow.
    Take a look at the "Nissan Skyline drive train and suspension adapted to 48 Stude" thread.
    Different strokes for different folks.
    South Lompoc Studebaker

  18. #58
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    Treblig,

    I'm really not trying to pick on you. From the beginning I was fairly sure that much of the allure of the build was the challenge of doing it. I just wanted to verify that was your motivation for doing it, which you did. I certainly didn't mean that it can't be done or shouldn't be done, in fact this is such a simple build that it has been done hundreds of times over the last thirty five years. In fact there is nothing modern about the technology that you are that you are using. The Mustang II/ Pinto technology is at least forty five years old and the 700R4 is thirty five years old! The original Studebaker equipment has proven itself to be at least as reliable as the Chevrolet parts that you are replacing them with. As Fred said in #46 "If you can't fix a Stude you're not a mechanic! If you can't fix them you sure can't fix a Chebby!" The two things that I would take issue with are the words "modern" and "reliable," neither one of these terms is in my definition of forty year old technology. You asked for opinions and I have given you my own. Your time, your money and your project so go for it, but do it because you want to not because you think you have to.-Bill

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallabutt View Post
    Treblig,

    I'm really not trying to pick on you. From the beginning I was fairly sure that much of the allure of the build was the challenge of doing it. I just wanted to verify that was your motivation for doing it, which you did. I certainly didn't mean that it can't be done or shouldn't be done, in fact this is such a simple build that it has been done hundreds of times over the last thirty five years. In fact there is nothing modern about the technology that you are that you are using. The Mustang II/ Pinto technology is at least forty five years old and the 700R4 is thirty five years old! The original Studebaker equipment has proven itself to be at least as reliable as the Chevrolet parts that you are replacing them with. As Fred said in #46 "If you can't fix a Stude you're not a mechanic! If you can't fix them you sure can't fix a Chebby!" The two things that I would take issue with are the words "modern" and "reliable," neither one of these terms is in my definition of forty year old technology. You asked for opinions and I have given you my own. Your time, your money and your project so go for it, but do it because you want to not because you think you have to.-Bill

    Bill, I have not at any point felt like I was being pick on. I have in previous posts written that I know there are purist in every make of car, foreign and domestic. I put a V8 Chevy in a Vega back in the 70s so I know what you're taking about. I realize that the Studebaker drive trains were dependable, heck....people have driven Studes cross country thousands of times over the years. My major goal is to make the car a little safer and make it so my daughter can get the car fixed quickly and easily when I'm not around. Plus I have to make the wife happy, after all she has gone along with all my other projects!! Members have asked me why I'm doing what I am doing and I don't get upset or angry, I merely explain why??? It doesn't deter me from my goal, I was committed the moment I sent 14 thousand dollars to a complete stranger in Alabama to buy a car I had never seen "in person". I had already done all the research and knew what I was going to do long before the car arrived.
    I joined this site for two reasons: to help others by documenting the build and to get information because I don't know everything.
    Thanks for your input,
    Treblig

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 56 PREZ 4D View Post
    You didn't show the ends on the battery cable.
    The best ends to use are mechanically crimped using a specialized crimp tool. Makes a connection that provides the best conductivity.
    Some use a terminal that's soldered to the cable but there are disadvantages to them.
    Brass battery terminals with external heat shrink tubing over the cable and terminal connection.
    It has a sealing compound that seals against moisture and acid corrosion.
    I didn't show the ends because they are still bare. Since I'm still driving the car here and there as I make modifications I need to leave the battery under the hood until I have built a box for it (in the trunk). I left each end extra long so I can trim to the correct length, then I'll install the lugs. I coiled the ends up under the car and zip tied them onto the frame until I'm ready to make the switch. I'm trying to get all the simple stuff out of the way in advance. I don't have one of those mechanical crimpers (they are nice) so I'll probably go with the solder joint, spray it with an anti corrosion coating then wrap it with linerless electrical tape (which will seal it from the atmosphere.

    treblig

  21. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 56 PREZ 4D View Post
    Interesting that the stock chevy frame used the same construction as a Stude.
    I wonder when chevy stopped using that construction style ?

    Very sharp eye!!!! I hadn't even noticed that!! Now that we on the subject of the frame I am faced with small dilemma?? The mustang II people asked my frame width to determine which cross member would fit best. Don't know whether to give them the dimension between the frame lips or between the horizontal part. I guess it would be strongest if I box the inside welding a plate to the lip and use that as the inside frame width dimension??

    treblig

  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by sals54 View Post
    Hey Treblig, Great looking project. I've been a Studebaker driver for many decades. Almost all of the Studes I've driven for any duration during that time have been Stude powered. But I gotta tell ya, I'm am right now, getting ready to go to Chevy LS power for my beloved 54 Coupe. Its had Stude power since I bought the car in 1971. But its time for me to try something new. We're gonna use a 6.0 with a Z06 cam backed up with a T56 6 speed. I'm getting excited just thinkin about it.
    I admire your efforts for your daughter. Good going. And keep up the good work.

    Thanks Sals54, Your car has a really nice body style...very sporty!! Are those traction bars I see under the back?? A 6.0 will make the car dangerous. Good luck and do your best to document it and post here to help others with similar ideas.

    treblig

  23. #63
    Speedster Member Quentin's Avatar
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    Good plan. If you don't want to do all the fabrication yerself, www.myerstudebaker.com do a crossmember to suit the chev trans/stude motor combo - (ask them whether its OK for a GM/GM setup) .
    Also, www.slickstreetstuff.com do Chev engine mounts that bolt straight on to the Stude mount holes. Might save you some work.

    Australian opinion (best read upside down) - I'm glad you like those seats....seems a bit incongruent to me that lots of effort is going into period correct steering wheel and air con evaporator, yet "the 1957 look" you are working hard to keep is then somewhat tarnished by those armchairs??

    However I must admit I too have a liking for decent seat belts- maybe as your Silver Hawk has a B pillar of sorts, perhaps a roll bar, in keeping with the period (as opposed to those chairs), could also double as a mounting point for the belt? Then you could keep those AWESOME Stude seats! Just a thought..............all the best with your build. Quentin

  24. #64
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    Very sharp eye!!!! I hadn't even noticed that!! Now that we on the subject of the frame I am faced with small dilemma?? The mustang II people asked my frame width to determine which cross member would fit best. Don't know whether to give them the dimension between the frame lips or between the horizontal part. I guess it would be strongest if I box the inside welding a plate to the lip and use that as the inside frame width dimension??

    treblig
    I know you like to "roll your own", but you might want to check out Art Morrison. They do complete frames/suspensions for C/Ks and may have just the front cross member.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA


  25. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    Very sharp eye!!!! I hadn't even noticed that!! Now that we on the subject of the frame I am faced with small dilemma?? The mustang II people asked my frame width to determine which cross member would fit best. Don't know whether to give them the dimension between the frame lips or between the horizontal part. I guess it would be strongest if I box the inside welding a plate to the lip and use that as the inside frame width dimension??

    treblig
    Treblig,

    Here is an attractive option I have run across in my search for front suspension ideas for my 61 Hawk project.

    http://www.industrialchassisinc.com/...ker-front-clip
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by MChance; 04-30-2015 at 10:05 AM.
    Mark Chance

    1933 Model 56 Coupe
    1955 Champion Coupe (53 clone project)
    1961 Hawk, bucket seats, 4 spd, TT (Autumn Haze)

  26. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quentin View Post
    Good plan. If you don't want to do all the fabrication yerself, www.myerstudebaker.com do a crossmember to suit the chev trans/stude motor combo - (ask them whether its OK for a GM/GM setup) .
    Also, www.slickstreetstuff.com do Chev engine mounts that bolt straight on to the Stude mount holes. Might save you some work.

    Australian opinion (best read upside down) - I'm glad you like those seats....seems a bit incongruent to me that lots of effort is going into period correct steering wheel and air con evaporator, yet "the 1957 look" you are working hard to keep is then somewhat tarnished by those armchairs??

    However I must admit I too have a liking for decent seat belts- maybe as your Silver Hawk has a B pillar of sorts, perhaps a roll bar, in keeping with the period (as opposed to those chairs), could also double as a mounting point for the belt? Then you could keep those AWESOME Stude seats! Just a thought..............all the best with your build. Quentin
    Quentin, I've already checked out the front clips for the Stude and I find them to be a good alternative. It's just that I've done so many Must II cross members that I can almost do them blind folded so it's in my comfort zone. I've also done a few Camaro front clips (like on my son's '46 Chevy) but I like the Must II system better, I don't really know why....it's just me!! However....those motor mounts look very interesting. I had planned to use the universal Chevy mount with the biscuit rubber thing like what they use on '57 Chevys but the ones you've found might make it easier (the price is fair). I kind of agree on the seats, they're a little bulky but I have already talked to my upholstery guy and he said he could de-bulk them before he recovers them so I'm ahead of you on that one. It would be great to have a roll bar and that would serve as the attach point for the belts but the original seats (which are very nice and recently upholstered) wouldn't do my daughter any good if someone hit her from the rear, it would probably break her neck!! Gotta have headrests or it would be on my conscious. Sometimes you have to compromise!!! A roll bar would be KILLER!!
    Once the seats have been de-bulked and reupholstered I think we'll be OK....well, safety first, she's my only daughter!
    PS - Thanks for the web sites!!!

    Oh, one of my favorite songs when I was growing up..."Tie me Kangaroo down Sport", "Take me Koala back Jack", and "So we tanned his hide when died Clyde and that's it hang'n on the Shed!!!" I still can't get the words out of my head!!

    Thanks,
    Treblig
    Last edited by Treblig; 04-30-2015 at 01:10 PM.

  27. #67
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    Oh....I forgot to mention that the factory bench front seats bolt down near the door sill. The buckets, of course have 4 bolts each. The inside rear bolt hole on both seats ends up passing through a box that is attached to the underside of the rear passenger space. I have no idea what this box is for except maybe stiffening. The bolt hole goes through where the box angles so you can't just put a nut on there because it won't sit flush at all. It's about a 30 degree angle. Anyway, I've having to fabricate some wedges so that when you tighten the bolt the nut will have a flat surface to tighten against. Here are the wedges before welding:

    DSC04510.JPGDSC04511.JPGDSC04512.JPGDSC04513.JPG

    I just leaned them together so you can see the shape they will form. I'll weld them up tomorrow and install if I have time. The rear bucket seat bolts on a shoulder harness seat are extremely important. The manufacturer uses a large high grade bolt screwed into a reinforced section of the floor on these types of seats because it you're in an accident you can actually rip the seats right out of the floor because during an accident your body weight is pulling on the seat belt which is attached to the seats. I always use large (1/2" or bigger) grade 8 bolts on all bucket seats with the built in shoulder harness. I also install a plate (4" X 4") under the floor beneath each bolt/nut because the floors (on the old cars) weren't really designed to take the force of a front end collision with respect to built-in shoulder harness seats/belts.
    But most everybody probably already knows, I'm just covering my Butt.
    Treblig

  28. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by MChance View Post
    Treblig,

    Here is an attractive option I have run across in my search for front suspension ideas for my 61 Hawk project.

    http://www.industrialchassisinc.com/...ker-front-clip
    Yes, Thanks you. I had found that web site already when I was researching for front ends. But I appreciate you posting the web site.

    treblig

  29. #69
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    Power Brake kit

    Here are the pics I promised on the universal power brake kit. The brake arm/pedal portion can be adjusted to the correct distance then you cut off all the excess part of the channel and attach the end of the channel to the dash. I'm not planning on using that ugly pedal. I'll remove it and replace with a more conventional pedal

    DSC04514.JPGDSC04515.JPGDSC04516.JPG.

    Treblig

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    I thought someone would chime in about the weird box below the rear passenger floor just behind the front seat. When I drilled holes for the inside (inboard) bucket seat bolts I had to drill through the regular floor sheet metal then through another piece of sheet metal. When I looked under the car (59 Silver Hawk) I found a box attached to the underside of the floor, the box is about 3 1/2" deep and 12" wide. It's just dead space and I don't know it's purpose?? Does anyone know the purpose of this box, it's on both sides of the car. You can see the back side of the box in this pic. It drops down just in front of the muffler bracket.

    thanks,
    trebligDSC04497.JPG
    Last edited by showbizkid; 05-02-2015 at 01:27 PM.

  31. #71
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    Right now you have a great original car it would be a huge waste to mangle it like you are thinking plus I just went through this at the local allignment shop. Once you chop that frame and graft a mustang suspension on it NO shop will touch it for liability reasons. All I did to my T Cab was put a dog leg in the drag link. Fortunately for me I set it up dead nuts on includeing the thrust angle so nothing had to be done. If you want to be stuck with doing all the work for the rest of your life then mangle it. Otherwise keep the original engine and change the automatic out to a newer automatic overdrive some time in the future. Ad Turner disk brakes to the front and rebuild the front suspension and I suggest using delrin or nylon and drive it. Getting rid of that rotting rubber will make it much nimbler. If you were close you could bring her by with her learners permit and drive Pinkie and you would see that with delrin she will not need powersteering. I taught my niece to drive in Pinkie and she had no problems inspite of Pinkies 5000 ft pound clutch and Crystal learned to drive on mountain dirt roads.

    If you are concerned about the tapered axles and I would not be as I have never broken a keyway in one of my T cabs and I drove them hard at speeds way in excess of highway limits I have a pair of flanged axles tha I can sell you cheep. I pulled them from my 65 as I could only find tapered axle parts cars locally so my 65 has tapered axles now.

    There are guys here that show you how to put a three point saftey harness into that car without mangling it.

    Now AC...... You can adapt an AC unit into it multiple ways Vintage Air is one way but you could be crafty enough to pull the AC from some other vehicle and adapt it or go with an electric compressor that was just posted here recently so to do that you would have to upgrade the chargeing capabilities but that is easy to do.

    One very important thing that involves driver survivability. Studebaker used three different horn rings if I am remembering right. That Hawk could have any. The delux ring has two ears that cover the stock steering wheel spokes and the ears have a loop that goes from ear to ear. These loops tend to break so one can grind them off and convert the delux ring to the type that has two ears and this is VERY DANGEROUS because during an impact your body contacts the steering wheel and bends the ears of the horn ring upward and then these ears become daggers that can kill the driver.

    The T cabs use a simple round horn ring and all my Studebakers except the 54 wagon use the simple ring. I was involved in an accident. I rear ended with my 65 ....a lady backing down a freeway onramp. I was traveling at 65 mph and she was traveling who knows how fast in reverse. I wound up with that bent horn ear shoved three inched into my skull. Fortunately for me it impacted my nasal cavity or I would be dead.

    Young drivers and Hi Performance engines do not mix. Some of you Washington members may remember from 15 years ago a headline from the Yakima area about a girl racing along against another vehicle. Both vehicles were full of highschool kids the girls vehicle tires sepperated and off the car flew into a hopfield killing the front seat passsenger and injuring the other occupants. My niece wound up in the hospital with a collapsed lung and then later charged with vehicular assault for killing her best friend that had been sitting up front with her.
    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

    65 2dr sedan
    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
    61 V8 Tcab
    63 Tcab 20R powered
    55 Commander Wagon
    54 Champion Wagon
    46 Gibson Model A
    50 JD MC
    45 Agricat
    67 Triumph T100
    66 Bultaco Matadore

  32. #72
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    I cant see the box in your photos but it could well be that is the box for the optional under seat heater as it sits on the passengers side.
    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

    65 2dr sedan
    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
    61 V8 Tcab
    63 Tcab 20R powered
    55 Commander Wagon
    54 Champion Wagon
    46 Gibson Model A
    50 JD MC
    45 Agricat
    67 Triumph T100
    66 Bultaco Matadore

  33. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by studebakerkid View Post
    Right now you have a great original car it would be a huge waste to mangle it like you are thinking plus I just went through this at the local allignment shop. Once you chop that frame and graft a mustang suspension on it NO shop will touch it for liability reasons. All I did to my T Cab was put a dog leg in the drag link. Fortunately for me I set it up dead nuts on includeing the thrust angle so nothing had to be done. If you want to be stuck with doing all the work for the rest of your life then mangle it. Otherwise keep the original engine and change the automatic out to a newer automatic overdrive some time in the future. Ad Turner disk brakes to the front and rebuild the front suspension and I suggest using delrin or nylon and drive it. Getting rid of that rotting rubber will make it much nimbler. If you were close you could bring her by with her learners permit and drive Pinkie and you would see that with delrin she will not need powersteering. I taught my niece to drive in Pinkie and she had no problems inspite of Pinkies 5000 ft pound clutch and Crystal learned to drive on mountain dirt roads.

    If you are concerned about the tapered axles and I would not be as I have never broken a keyway in one of my T cabs and I drove them hard at speeds way in excess of highway limits I have a pair of flanged axles tha I can sell you cheep. I pulled them from my 65 as I could only find tapered axle parts cars locally so my 65 has tapered axles now.

    There are guys here that show you how to put a three point saftey harness into that car without mangling it.

    Now AC...... You can adapt an AC unit into it multiple ways Vintage Air is one way but you could be crafty enough to pull the AC from some other vehicle and adapt it or go with an electric compressor that was just posted here recently so to do that you would have to upgrade the chargeing capabilities but that is easy to do.

    One very important thing that involves driver survivability. Studebaker used three different horn rings if I am remembering right. That Hawk could have any. The delux ring has two ears that cover the stock steering wheel spokes and the ears have a loop that goes from ear to ear. These loops tend to break so one can grind them off and convert the delux ring to the type that has two ears and this is VERY DANGEROUS because during an impact your body contacts the steering wheel and bends the ears of the horn ring upward and then these ears become daggers that can kill the driver.

    The T cabs use a simple round horn ring and all my Studebakers except the 54 wagon use the simple ring. I was involved in an accident. I rear ended with my 65 ....a lady backing down a freeway onramp. I was traveling at 65 mph and she was traveling who knows how fast in reverse. I wound up with that bent horn ear shoved three inched into my skull. Fortunately for me it impacted my nasal cavity or I would be dead.

    Young drivers and Hi Performance engines do not mix. Some of you Washington members may remember from 15 years ago a headline from the Yakima area about a girl racing along against another vehicle. Both vehicles were full of highschool kids the girls vehicle tires sepperated and off the car flew into a hopfield killing the front seat passsenger and injuring the other occupants. My niece wound up in the hospital with a collapsed lung and then later charged with vehicular assault for killing her best friend that had been sitting up front with her.

    I have modified the front suspension on numerous cars, for myself and other people. Neither I nor anyone else has ever had an issue getting a "lifetime" alignment from Firestone. As long as the job is done properly the alignment shops have no problem with it. I really appreciate your love for the original cars. I was talking to my daughter today and she was telling me that when she has kids she hopes to pass the Silver Hawk on to one of her own children. My daughter has a small frame (5 foot tall and 110 lbs)...she's pretty much full grown!! Don't know what happened...I'm 6' 1"!!! Must be on her Mother's side??? As far as the steering wheel goes, here are some pics:

    DSC04475.JPGDSC04476.JPGDSC04481.JPG

    I don't want her to get hurt during an accident but I can only do so much to protect her. I truly appreciate the insight you're offering and hope that my direction on this build doesn't discourage you from continuing to keep me on a safe path for my daughter. I'm not installing a high performance engine, just a stock 350 Chevy but I truly appreciate your concerns, more than you might think!! I shutter to think about my daughter being in an accident but all I can do is build the car with as many things as possible to help her survive a collision. I did the same thing for my son with his '46 Chevy. What I do "tears at my heart" but I know what my kids love and I was the same way when I was young!!! I remember driving 100 miles an hour in dense fog. I could barely see the stripes on the road and if someone had been stranded in the road in my path I would have died a long time ago. I'm sure many members did stupid things like I did when I was young. My kids are smarter than I was/am (luckily). I can not deny them what they want as long as they do well in school. When I was their age all I had was a bicycle!! Please feel free to continue to give me important information like what you have posted, I'm all ears when it comes to my daughter. But don't be offended if I don't follow all your advise....I'm doing what I think needs to be done as you would for your own!!

    treblig

  34. #74
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    Here are the angular blocks I made to make sure that the inboard rear bucket seat bolts sit flat against the underside of the Silver Hawk body:


    DSC04519.JPGDSC04520.JPGDSC04521.JPG
    Now keep in mind....These will be attached to the underbelly of the car so please ignore the imperfect welds. If these parts were to be used somewhere where they could be seen I would have welded them much better and smoothed them a lot more. As it turns out....they will be painted and undercoated and used to offset the angle on the front side of the weird box that is attached to the underside of the Silver Hawk body. They are basically "spacers" that make a correction for the angle at which the seat bolt protrudes under the car. I will be sure to post pics of the angular blocks once they are installed. To answer someone else's question...the "box" I have been referring to is not the heater box. I removed the heater box, the heater box is forward of this box, in any case, there is a box like this on both sides. I will do my best to take some pics tomorrow to try and show these boxes. The underside of this Silver Hawk has a nice "flat black" undercoat which makes all features less distinguishable. And yes....I plan to tack weld a 4" X 4" piece of flat metal to these angle block before I bolt them to the bottom of the car.

    Treblig

  35. #75
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    I think the boxes you are describing are the rear seat footwells used on the coupes.

    Here's a pic from Classic Enterprises replacement parts catalog.


  36. #76
    President Member Jeff_H's Avatar
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    I thought someone would chime in about the weird box below the rear passenger floor just behind the front seat. When I drilled holes for the inside (inboard) bucket seat bolts I had to drill through the regular floor sheet metal then through another piece of sheet metal. When I looked under the car (59 Silver Hawk) I found a box attached to the underside of the floor, the box is about 3 1/2" deep and 12" wide. It's just dead space and I don't know it's purpose?? Does anyone know the purpose of this box, it's on both sides of the car. You can see the back side of the box in this pic, sorry...I accidentally attached it 4 times and don't know how to delete. It drops down just in front of the muffler bracket.
    There are "wells" on each side behind the front seat for more foot room. Are those covered over for some reason???

    tunnelsurgery3small.jpg

    This picture from a few years ago when I was redoing the driveshaft tunnel on my '53 (essentially the same as your Hawk).

    Jeff in ND

  37. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    I think the boxes you are describing are the rear seat footwells used on the coupes.

    Here's a pic from Classic Enterprises replacement parts catalog.

    The boxes on my car are similar to these pics you posted, but the ones shown in your pics are designed wrong. The floor is flat on a Silver Hawk, these boxes look like they fit against a non-flat surface with an angle at one end. I appreciate your pics and your post but something is not right with the pics you posted....unless I'm looking at it all wrong?? I am a machinist, so angles and surface features are something I am very aware of.
    Please continue to help!!
    treblig

  38. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
    There are "wells" on each side behind the front seat for more foot room. Are those covered over for some reason???

    tunnelsurgery3small.jpg

    This picture from a few years ago when I was redoing the driveshaft tunnel on my '53 (essentially the same as your Hawk).
    Jeff, What you are saying makes a lot of sense. At first I thought they were foot wells but I have not lifted the carpet so I don't know if the floor has been modified. It makes perfect sense for the manufacturer to make a box feature to make more room for the rear passenger's feet, that would be great!! The car has new carpeting and I have had no reason to pull it up. The carpet looks brand new and was installed very nicely. I was hoping that another Silver Hawk owner would know the answer to this "box" question?? Besides...why would anyone cover the boxes and make "less room" for the rear passenger's feet????

    treblig

  39. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    I think the boxes you are describing are the rear seat footwells used on the coupes.

    Here's a pic from Classic Enterprises replacement parts catalog.


    DEEPNHOCK, Now that I've looked more closely to "Jeff_H's" pics, I think you may be correct??/

    treblig

  40. #80
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Treblig, I truly admire your patience. The purists keep after you and you show them nothing but kindness. If anything you've proven yourself as more than capable to modify your Hawk as you see fit. I believe anything can be improved on, especially cars that are 50+ years old. I'm especially interested in your Mustang II conversion as I am considering that myself. I can't wait to see more updates of your progress. I still have my hopes up that a modified forum will be created that was discussed a few weeks ago.
    Gary

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