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Thread: Silver Hawk Major Modifications

  1. #961
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peanut View Post
    I wouldn't own a car without a CHMSL. Good choice.
    I agree, I also put one in my son's '46 Chevy and since I had the headliner out I took the time to weld a mounting bracket onto the underside of the roof (before the car was painted), just above the rear window. Once the headliner was installed I had a good solid place to mount the third brake light!!
    You can just see the 3rdbrake light in the last pic.....

    DSC04247.JPGDSC04248.JPGDSC04250.JPG

    Treblig

  2. #962
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    So I had to make this simple bracket, I welded some elevator bolts to the bracket to make it easy to install:

    DSC07235.JPGDSC07236.JPG


    This bracket goes inside the brake light and allows me to bolt the light down on top of the package tray.


    DSC07237.JPGDSC07238.JPG

    The long piece of 1/2" box iron is designed to hold the light securely against the package tray and also span across the speaker hole in the metal part of the package tray. I didn't want to bolt the light against the package tray fiber panel so I decided to span the speaker hole so I could pull the light against the upholstery nice and tight:

    DSC07239.JPGDSC07240.JPG

    I used blue painters tape to locate the holes for the elevator bolts and an extra hole for the wiring:

    DSC07241.JPGDSC07242.JPGDSC07243.JPG

    Now all I need to do is run a wire from the brake light switch (now mounted just behind the brake pedal arm) to the light. I ordered a super bright LED light to replace the 1156 bulb so that the Silver hawk will get plenty of attention when my daughter hits the brake!!

    Treblig

  3. #963
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    I got the 3rd brake light all hooked up, had to run a dedicated wire from the brake light switch to the new light. I wanted a really bright light for my daughter's safety so I searched ebay and found a 2000 lumen LED 1156 bulb replacement. I couldn't find the amperage draw on the LED I bought and since the 1156 factory bulb only has 402 lumens I really wasn't sure if the LED would blow the fuse??? The new system will actually have three lights, the two stop lights and the 3rd brake light. I wasn't sure if three lights would be too much for the factory Stude fuse/wiring. Either way I ordered the super bright LED and installed it today. Before I removed the old 1156 bulb I used my amp meter to see how many amps the old bulb pulls with 402 lumens. The regular bulb uses 1.85 amps, I would imagine that the tail light bulbs use the same amount. I installed the LED and was pleasantly surprised that, even though it has 4 1/2 times more lumens, it only draws .59 amps!! That's less than 1/3 as many amps with more than 4 times the brightness!!:

    DSC07252.JPG

    Now that I know how many amps these super bright LEDs actually use I will surely replace the tail light bulbs soon. The LEDs also have a much, much longer life!!

    treblig

  4. #964
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    Learned something new about the Silver Hawk today:


    DSC07278.JPGDSC07279.JPGDSC07280.JPGDSC07281.JPG

    I received all the new 1/4 glass rubber, front and back glass rubber, tail and reverse light gaskets and license plate light lens over Thanksgiving period. I also got the vent window rubber. I removed the 1/4 windows to replace the rubber and figured it would take a few minutes but found that the glass hinges actually go through slots in the rubber. You have to drill out 6 rivets to remove the glass and separate it from the window trim. Now that the glass is out it's an easy job to install the new rubber. You have to take a lot of care when removing the rivets so that you don't damage the trim or the glass or the hinges!!

    treblig

  5. #965
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    Well that was more challenging than I thought it would be??? The old original rubber came out pretty easy, it simply broke into a million pieces (like sheet rock). I cleaned and sanded the whole thing, primed and repainted. It was kind of difficult to get the new rubber seal into the window trim. I'm glad it was difficult because if it wasn't a very tight fit it would probably leak. Either way it took about an hour to get it in there and seated. I thought the glass part (hinges) would simply slide into the slots in the rubber seal but it's not that simple. The factory must have had a fixture and some special tools because it takes a lot of effort to get both of the hinges to push through the slot in the rubber seal. Or maybe they used some sort of lube. I didn't want to use any lube because it hard enough to push and pull on the glass panel when it's bone dry!!:

    DSC07282.JPGDSC07283.JPGDSC07284.JPGDSC07285.JPG

    The hinges barely fit through the rubber slots and you're also pushing against the whole rubber lip (on the hinge side of the glass). As you can see in the pics I've got it pretty close. Once I get the holes to line up I can put the rivets back in. That last 1/4" is going to be a bear, the glass panel won't hardly move as it is. But the tighter the fit the better the seal!! I let the whole thing sit over night to let the rubber shape itself to the glass panel, besides, my fingers and fingernails were getting sore from all the pushing/pulling.
    I initially thought that this would be a 15-20 min job............guess I was wrong.

    treblig

  6. #966
    President Member Corvanti's Avatar
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    do you have a heat gun? i've used one on "difficult" weatherstripping to soften it up. i've had a Harbor Freight gun for years. a hair blow dryer will work, but not near the heat a gun will produce.
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  7. #967
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corvanti View Post
    do you have a heat gun? i've used one on "difficult" weatherstripping to soften it up. i've had a Harbor Freight gun for years. a hair blow dryer will work, but not near the heat a gun will produce.

    Great idea!! I hadn't thought of using a heat gun. Yes, I have a real nice heavy duty one.

    Treblig

  8. #968
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    I had to use every scribe and probe I had in the tool box to get the holes to line up. It was extremely tight. As I looked at it and was getting ready to install the rivets I said to myself, "It shouldn't be this tight!!". So I looked at it from many angles and tried to figure out why it would be in such a bind. Then it hit me!!! I had inserted the glass panel from the wrong side of the metal trim. It's pretty easy to put the glass into the trim from the wrong side because it fits either way. But it only seals properly when installed from the "outside" of the trim, by outside I'm talking about the outside of the car when the trim is installed.


    DSC07286.JPGDSC07287.JPGDSC07288.JPG

    So I pulled my scribes and probes and inserted the glass from the other side of the trim. It went "in" a lot easier. It was still pretty tight but with much less binding. Now that I have it all figured out I'll remove the other trim and glass panel so that I can rivet both of them at the same time. Of course I'll sand and paint the other side before I reinstall the glass.
    I hope the vent window rubber seal is easier!!

    Treblig

  9. #969
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    Windshield scratches!!! YIKES!!

    I had mentioned a while back about some pretty scary scratches or scrapes in my daughter's windshield. I really didn't want to order a new glass so, instead, I ordered a Cerium Oxide kit ($28) from China. It was put on a "slow boat" (as we all know) and finally arrived the other day. The kit came with velcro polishing wheels, other buffing devices and drill adapters.
    Here are some pics of the windshield. It's really hard to get a good clear pic of the scratches (too many reflections) but I'm pretty sure you can see them in some of the pics.

    DSC07289.JPGDSC07301.JPGDSC07300.JPGDSC07299.JPGDSC07298.JPG

    I used tape on the inside of the glass so I could keep track of where the scratches were located. Once you start polishing it's really hard to see the scratches, the slurry get in the way. In this pic I had already polished the area a few times so the scratches are really hard to see.
    DSC07297.JPG


    More scratch pics:

    DSC07293.JPGDSC07290.JPGDSC07302.JPG

    At first it didn't seem like anything was happening but as I kept working on the glass the scratches started to slowly disappear. Before I started the glass looked like someone had run the WW wipers without any rubbers on them. I really didn't think this Cerium would work but was I surprised!! The driver's side had 3 long scrapes the full length of the WW wiper stroke. The passenger's side only had one major scrape along the WW wiper stroke. As I polished I examined the glass closely and found that the areas that I had polished looked way better than all the rest of the glass. As it turns out, the whole windshield was covered with these tiny fine scratches. I decided to do the whole windshield so that one area wouldn't be super slick with the rest just looking OK.
    I'm pretty happy with the results but I can't show them to the Studebaker world because it's really hard to take a picture of something that isn't there (NOTHING)!!!LOL


    All you have to do is have two containers. One with water and one with a slurry of the Cerium mixed with water. You wet the buffing wheel then dip it in the slurry (left bowl). The water bowl eventually gets a little slurry in it but it doesn't matter.
    DSC07296.JPG



    treblig

  10. #970
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    Neat, glad it cleaned up. Just one question, how's the view after dark with lights shining through it. I hope fine because I could use that technology in the future. Bob
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  11. #971
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetolbob View Post
    Neat, glad it cleaned up. Just one question, how's the view after dark with lights shining through it. I hope fine because I could use that technology in the future. Bob
    I'll have to drive it at night to see but I can tell already that the glass looks super clear and no reflections from all the tiny scratches/imperfections that were in it before. It's nice to look out the front through the glass and not see the glass itself!!

    treblig

  12. #972
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Hi Gil, do you have a link for the cerium? I have a couple of windshields that need work.
    Thanks, Gary
    Gary

  13. #973
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    Quote Originally Posted by garrilla View Post
    Hi Gil, do you have a link for the cerium? I have a couple of windshields that need work.
    Thanks, Gary

    Hey Gary...where u been???

    Winter is the best time to polish the glass because the main thing you need to watch out for is getting the glass too hot. You have to constantly touch the glass (as you polish) with your bare fingers to make sure it's not getting hot. Once it starts getting warm in one area I would move to a different area and return to the first spot after it cools off. The glass will crack/break if you get it too hot. Being that it's cold outside it took longer for the glass to get hot and also cooled off much faster. If you notice that the stuff is getting dry on the glass just dip your fingers in the water and spritz the glass with some water, polishing with a dry buffer pad really creates a lot of heat.:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/332005071236...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    I was mistaken about this item coming from China, the stuff from China is a lot cheaper and you can also find it on ebay. I wanted to get the front glass repaired quickly because of the low angle winter sun for my daughter so I ordered this more expensive one from California. But it was well worth it!!! What I have found is that businesses in the US order the exact same product from China or Pakistan or wherever then they increase the price 30 percent and resell it on ebay. When you need it fast you gotta pay more!! Take your time and be sure to keep the polishing pad moving so that you don't create a low spot. It's much like sanding body putty on a metal body panel, you sand up and down when diagonally then horizontal so that it comes out level in all directions.
    One more thing, clean up is much, much easier if you tape off all around the edge of the glass to keep the slinging slurry from getting embedded under the stainless trim, once you have the trim taped off cover the hood, fenders and roof with paper (or a cheap plastic painter's tarp) otherwise you'll spend an extra 20-30 minutes wiping down the car.

    Nice to hear from you again!!

    Good Luck and be careful!!

    Treblig

  14. #974
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Thanks Gil! I've been distracted with my 59 Ford Ranchero as it is driveable and my Wagonaire isn't right now. Both have scratched windshields and are impossible to see through when heading towards the sun. I have a 3" orbital buffer, do you think that would be aggressive enough? I also have a drill with pad I can use if that's better. I have glass kits from Eastwood and Griots that I haven't tried yet but those 2 aren't as aggressive as what you used.
    Ranchero:
    SAM_1455.jpg
    Gary

  15. #975
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    Quote Originally Posted by garrilla View Post
    Thanks Gil! I've been distracted with my 59 Ford Ranchero as it is driveable and my Wagonaire isn't right now. Both have scratched windshields and are impossible to see through when heading towards the sun. I have a 3" orbital buffer, do you think that would be aggressive enough? I also have a drill with pad I can use if that's better. I have glass kits from Eastwood and Griots that I haven't tried yet but those 2 aren't as aggressive as what you used.
    Ranchero:
    SAM_1455.jpg
    That Ranchero looks like it could turn out to be a very cool looking car....HINT, HINT 428!!

    I used my battery powered Makita drill which was a little more awkward than a 90 degree buffer. But the polishing kit comes with velcro buffing discs which are designed for polishing the glass with the cerium. The kit also comes with the small adapters so that you can put the polishing wheel/disc on any drill that has a chuck. The polishing pads are also velcro. I'll post some better pics of the kit later today. The orbital buffer would be ideal if you can get the special buffing disc on there?? The cordless drill I used torques in a manner that is awkward but with no cord it makes it a little easier.
    They sell the Cerium (on ebay) without any of the discs/adapter but I don't know what would be the proper disc or buffing pad to use against the glass. So to be safe I ordered the kit with the proper discs and wheels. Once you start seeing results you'll start to get excited and try to polish faster....IT'S A TRAP!!! The faster you go and the more pressure you apply the hotter the glass becomes!!!

    treblig

  16. #976
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    As promised here are the pics of the items that came in my kit (bag of powder not shown):

    DSC07303.JPGDSC07304.JPG


    The small buffers are for getting into the corners on the windshield. I would say the bag of powder that came with this kit would do at least two windshields.

    Treblig

  17. #977
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    As promised here are the pics of the items that came in my kit (bag of powder not shown):

    DSC07303.JPGDSC07304.JPG


    The small buffers are for getting into the corners on the windshield. I would say the bag of powder that came with this kit would do at least two windshields.

    Treblig
    Thanks Gil,I ordered the same kit.
    Gary

  18. #978
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    Quote Originally Posted by garrilla View Post
    Thanks Gil,I ordered the same kit.


    Great !! Let me know how it works out for you.

    PS - You don't have to rotate the drill/buffer motor that fast to get good results. The faster you spin it the more mess it makes and ends up wasting all the polishing compound.

    Treblig

  19. #979
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    Well it's been a while since I posted anything on the Silver Hawk. My daughter has been driving it to and from school but couldn't drive it on real cold days because I have the new heater out of the car. I have already fitted the new heater (previous posts) and all I need to do is install into the brackets that I already have under the dash. The problem is that I'm still fighting radio static with the engine running!!
    If I install the heater it would be right in the way of the radio access (AC is also there), not to mention having to disconnect the water lines under the dash. Anyway, the reason for this post is that it finally got warm enough for me to go outside and troubleshoot the static problem. I had already tried an in line resistor (or whatever it's called) on the 12V power wire and an in line thingy on the antennae cable. I tried rerouting many of the power lines as well. I also tried an alternator resistor thingy (no help). I even ran a dedicated wire from the alternator to the battery (in the trunk) to avoid getting any RFI through the under hod wiring. I've done a lot of reading on the subject and one thing I hadn't tackled was the antennae cable where it runs along the passenger's threshold (under the carpet). I read that if you run an antennae next to and parallel to any power wires the antennae can pick up RFI/EMI. I had installed the antennae mast (an electronic box on the rear package tray) and ran the cable behind the passenger's rear door panel and under the passenger's threshold carpet. But I had also ran a couple of 12V wires in the same space to give 24/7 12V to the radio (memory) and the factory clock. So today I tore it all apart and ran the antennae cable under the rear seat (above the carpet) and along the trans hump just to see if it made any difference.

    LOW AND BEHOLD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That damn thing worked perfectly with the engine "on" or "off". I've been fighting this problem for many, many months and had been avoiding removing the rear passenger's 1/4 glass, side panel and threshold stainless because it's a hassle since I'm so tall. It always kills my neck and back being cramped back there. The only complaint my daughter ever had about the car was that she couldn't listen to the radio on her way to school. Well now that problem is solved!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Now you know..... non of this makes sense and that's why I never bothered to disassemble the rear panel and 1/4 glass. The reason I never took this action was that the radio sounded fine with the engine off even though the 24/7 12V wire was getting juice all the time and turning the engine "on" shouldn't have made any difference because the wires that run under the carpet don't feed anything under the hood. But Murphy's Law is more consistent than GRAVITY!!! Maybe that long length of wire (under the threshold) was acting like an antennae and transferring the energy to the radio antennae. I DON'T KNOW!!!

    All I know is that the radio is fixed and I can now install the heater.....JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER!!

    treblig

  20. #980
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Glad you found it Gil. I was going to suggest that you read up on ground loops, that is generally the issue with engine/alternator noise.
    Gary

  21. #981
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    Quote Originally Posted by garrilla View Post
    Glad you found it Gil. I was going to suggest that you read up on ground loops, that is generally the issue with engine/alternator noise.
    Garrilla...do you ever get your glass polishing kit??

    Treblig

  22. #982
    Speedster Member garrilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    Garrilla...do you ever get your glass polishing kit??

    Treblig
    Yes I did,but I'm involved in making brackets for power steering, alternator and ac compressor for the Ford 223 inline 6.
    Glass polishing is on the list.
    Gary

  23. #983
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    So the Silver Hawk has 1" holes in the frame just behind the front tires and just in front of the back tires.
    DSC07515.JPGDSC07516.JPG



    This 1" hole happens to be at a frame brace which makes it perfect for the modern (easier to use ) jack that I'll store in the trunk. I bought an 86 Mote Carlo jack at a swap meet really, really cheap then I refurbished it. It looks pretty much brand new. I welded a 1" diameter extension (1/4" thick steel spacer) to the original Monte Carlo frame pad. Now when the Hawk gets a flat tire you can easily locate the jack into the 1" holes in the frame and safely raise the car. The jack can't slip out of the hole so I won't have to worry about any accidents:


    DSC07517.JPGDSC07518.JPGDSC07519.JPG

    My daughter has been driving the car every day to school and back and I've got all the major "bugs" out of it. Now that it's warmed up outside I had time to modify the jack. I'll be testing it real soon and will also show my daughter how to use the jack and change a tire. I also plan to tape off and spray paint (orange) the short section of the frame where the 1" holes are located that way neither my daughter or anyone else will accidentally try and put the jack into the wrong frame hole as the frame has numerous factory holes of different sizes in different locations.

    Treblig

  24. #984
    Speedster Member ndynis's Avatar
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    Man, you don't miss a thing! Great idea but took some thinking to come up with it. I made each of my daughters change a tire in the driveway before they were allowed to take their first trip out of town solo.
    Thanks for posting!!

  25. #985
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndynis View Post
    Man, you don't miss a thing! Great idea but took some thinking to come up with it. I made each of my daughters change a tire in the driveway before they were allowed to take their first trip out of town solo.
    Thanks for posting!!
    Well thanks for the kind words. I know I won't be on this earth forever so I have to try and think of everything. I had my daughter outside yesterday checking her tire pressure, checking her oil level and checking the trans fluid level (it was 1/2 quart low). I showed her how to add trans fluid and how "not" to overfill. We'll see how she can handle breaking the lug nuts loose and removing and reinstalling the hub caps. All this stuff is pretty mundane to us old guys but even my son who is 22 years old can mess up. My son's '46 Chevy (Post 961) has old school aluminum wheels on his car. They require those special long, "shouldered" lug nuts but the spare tire is a regular steel rim which requires the old type "factory" lug nuts (the ones with the taper on one end). Well....he had removed the aluminum wheels a few times over the years to re-polish them so he knew how to safely remove and replace the wheels/tires. I had told him about the spare in the trunk and that it required different lug nuts (which he keeps in his console).
    Long story short, he had a flat while at college (50 miles away). He called and told me about it and he said that he and his friends had put the spare on the car. He drove the car home on the weekend so I could get the aluminum rim tire fixed. I casually checked the spare tire on the car and told him that he had done a good job fending for himself....but as I examined the spare tire mounted on the car I noticed that the factory lug nuts had been installed backwards!! He had put the flat side of the lug nut against the rims. He had driven 50 miles at 70 MPH. I had a shiver run down my spine just thinking about it!!! It was my fault because although he had removed and installed his aluminum rims many times I had never "actually" made him put the spare on his car. Because we never went through the motions I was never able to show him how the factory lug nuts go on the lugs.
    After seeing the lug nuts installed backwards I removed one lug nut and showed him that there is a taper on one side and that the taper helps to center the wheel on the hub and that the taper also helps keep sufficient torque on the wheel. By putting the lugs on backwards there's a chance that they might come loose as he drives down the highway. I beat myself up pretty good for endangering his life. To be sure, my daughter will absolutely know about the proper lug nut installation!!



    PS - The funny part about this story is that my son is graduating next week with a mechanical engineering degree and still has a lot to learn!!!!!

    Treblig

  26. #986
    Speedster Member ndynis's Avatar
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    Many times brilliant people are a little short on common sense! Great story. I still plan to give you a PM when I'm heading to Corpus Christi one of these days and see if we can't get together for a cup of coffee.
    Mighty lucky young lady with a Studebaker Hawk for daily transportation!
    Nick

  27. #987
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndynis View Post
    Many times brilliant people are a little short on common sense! Great story. I still plan to give you a PM when I'm heading to Corpus Christi one of these days and see if we can't get together for a cup of coffee.
    Mighty lucky young lady with a Studebaker Hawk for daily transportation!
    Nick
    Absolutely, all I need is a heads up!! My treat!!

    treblig

  28. #988
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    Well I was pleasantly surprised and amazed that the Monte Carlo jack fit really nice in the place where the original jack was installed. I had to do a little bending and adjusting of the hold down clamp but otherwise it was a piece of cake!!:

    DSC07526.JPGDSC07527.JPGDSC07528.JPGDSC07529.JPGDSC07530.JPG


    Now the only issue I have is "What to do with this all original really nice jack????" I have no use for it and hate to put it on the shelf forever. It looks brand new, either somebody refinished it or it's never been used??

    DSC07531.JPGDSC07532.JPG

    Treblig

  29. #989
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    Those who state that the Mustang II suspension is a mistake are sooo wrong. A bit of simple research proves such. I've got a Studebaker C body with professionally installed MII, that has 11 years, and 70,000 miles on it.....no problems. I did not use the Mustang brakes......it is adapted to Camaro disc, very happy with it.

    Tempestan

  30. #990
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    Quote Originally Posted by tempestan View Post
    Those who state that the Mustang II suspension is a mistake are sooo wrong. A bit of simple research proves such. I've got a Studebaker C body with professionally installed MII, that has 11 years, and 70,000 miles on it.....no problems. I did not use the Mustang brakes......it is adapted to Camaro disc, very happy with it.

    Tempestan
    I'll have to agree with you. My daughter's Silver Hawk drives very much like a newer car. I drove it with the original manual steering and it was a dog. Unfortunately for me our driveway is very crowded. If the Silver Hawk didn't have the power steering and Must II front end we wouldn't be able to maneuver it into the tight spaces that we have for parking our cars.

    Treblig

  31. #991
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treblig View Post
    I recently purchased a very nice 59 Silver Hawk. I bought it for my 15 year old daughter (it was the car she wanted). Before I can let her drive it I plan to make many modifications. Mustang II cross member w/power disc brakes, Chevy 350 w/700R4 trans, center console with shifter, bucket electric seats. The car must be dependable and safe and she has to be able to get it fixed wherever she might go. It currently has a perfectly good running original V8 with good two speed automatic which will be removed and sold. My plan was to take pictures and document the transition for others on this site who might be interested. I know that some members here will say "leave it original!!", but the only way my wife will let my daughter have the car is if has a newer drive train, power disc brakes, overdrive trans and shoulder harness seat belts (another modification). Oh yes, modern AC unit, it's very hot and humid where we live. As per my daughter's instructions I plan to keep as many of the original body parts as possible because she really likes the original look of the car.
    I'm posting here today to see if there is any interest in what I am about to do. If there is sufficient interest I will do my best to document everything and post it all here. I will post pics of the car as soon as possible.


    PS - I couldn't find a title that read, "Engine/Transmission swap", could the moderators help with that??? Anyway, I had to select "Engine" for the title.


    treblig
    You might have her help do the build.This can be very trying. But they value the car more and try to take better of the car. My girls helped on their cars. A think they even learned a thing or two.

  32. #992
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tex
    Posts
    905
    I have had her help me from time to time but since she's going full time to College and also have a part time job I can only get her out there from time to time. But I totally agree with you about the "buy in". Now that summer is here she should be able to get more involved.
    I do take the time to pull her outside for 10-15 at a time (dragging her away from her homework) to explain how everything works, like the emergency brake, fan relays, neutral safety switch and so on. I still need to show her how to jump the battery if she ever needs to do that.

    treblig

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