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Thread: Width of Lark bucket seats

  1. #1
    President Member 4961Studebaker's Avatar
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    Width of Lark bucket seats

    For reference. What is the seating area width for lark bucket seats. Looking for seats with a similar shape but allow room for console.

    Wiseguy's seats come 16 19 and 21" and wondered how they compare to factory.

    Thanks

    http://www.wiseguys-seats.com/catalog_featured.html

    EDIT:

    Found this reference of 60's cars Lark included.

    http://www.oldride.com/library/1962_bucket_seats.html

    Last edited by 4961Studebaker; 04-24-2013 at 10:15 AM.

    61 Lark

  2. #2
    President Member
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    I just measured, The stock buckets in my '64 Datona are 22" wide.
    ...maybe 22 1/2", the bottom cushion is a bit flexable.
    Anyway they are quite generously proportioned, so you will have literally hundreds of choices.

    I have a set of power/tilt/reclining buckets from a Chrysler LeBaron K-Car in my '62 Lark.
    ...as all of the power switches are mounted on the seat itself, something to keep in mind if you want or find power seats, as it is a lot more difficult to install remote door mounted switches and wiring.

    A little OT, but for the grandkids I installed a set of '90s Chrysler minivan removable second row reclining buckets in the back of my GMC Savanna Commercial van. fold down arm rests on each side, manual recline, slide out cup-holders in the base, and with one pull on the release lever they can be lifted out or shoved to the rear.
    Best part of all, the pair in like new condition cost me a whopping $20 bucks at a local junkyard
    (and I had my choice of about 8 different sets) as they are not a high demand item.

    I also put in the Chryslers retractable seat/sholder belts to keep the little buggers in place, cost me another $10.
    (No it was not any 'buddy' deal, I'd never set foot in the place before and knew no one there)
    Last edited by Jessie J.; 04-24-2013 at 11:06 AM.

  3. #3
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    These are late 90's Nissan Maxima seats in my '64 Daytona. I chose these because they had some "girth" and did not look out of place (size wise) in the car. They are 22-1/4" wide at the widest section. The outer seat frame sits roughly 6" inward from the outer edge of the door opening. The console is just under 7" wide and is from a late 80's Cadillac. 2" was cut from the bottom to lower it. The seats were $16 each and the console $12 from self serve yards.
    downsized_0724121641.jpg
    I mentioned this the other day, but think it should be repeated. The steering column is not positioned parallel to the the front/back of the car. A string attached to the bottom of the column and pulled in line with it (you have to angle towards the roof, but the direction still indicates) pointing it towards the driver's rear tail light. I found it necessary to angle the seats inward otherwise the driving position felt awkward. It actually took a bit of trial and error to feel "at one" with the steering wheel and not have the leg for the gas pedal feeling out of alignment. I highly recommend you test your positioning rather than just bolting new seats in straight. With a bench seat or '60's era broad, flat "bucket" seat you can probably shift around to get comfortable. But with modern bucket seats that have a better form fit to the body the misalignment will be rather noticeable.

    Tom
    Last edited by wittsend; 04-25-2013 at 11:35 AM.

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