Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Rear drum removal

  1. #1
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Mechanicville, NY
    Posts
    2

    Rear drum removal

    2013-01-02_19-28-11_493.jpgI'm a new Studebaker owner. I bought a '62 Hawk. A real barn find that hasn't run in 17 years. The engine now runs good. I'm on to fixing the brakes. I've tried everything I can think of but I can not get the rear drums off. I need to know what the trick is.

  2. #2
    President Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Union, CT., USA.
    Posts
    2,777
    Welcome gary,I would suggest putting the axle nut on "backwards" to protect the threads.back off the rear shoes if possible,and looks like your on the right track otherwise.I've had them come off hard,watch the toes and anything of value that may be against the garage walls cuz sometimes they pop suddenly.and when you put all back together,do not put anything on the axle leave it dry metal to metal.
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  3. #3
    President Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Omaha, Ne. summer- Sun City,Az. winter
    Posts
    3,810
    Usually after tightening the screw of the puller if you whack the end of the screw with a hammer and keep tightening it will eventually come loose. After you loosened the axle nut make sure you remove it, turn it around and screw it back onto the axle flush to keep from mushrooming the end of it.
    Frank van Doorn
    Omaha, Ne.
    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
    1963 Daytona Conv. 259, Flightomatic
    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

  4. #4
    Silver Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Greer, sc, USA.
    Posts
    6,346
    Good suggestions. With that wheel puller tool, you are way ahead of many who buy cars with tapered axles and have never attempted to remove the drum before. I have done this many times and never had a problem with the threads as long as the axle nut was used as suggested. Your picture does not show the "t" handle that goes on the end of that puller. There are times when you need to give the T handle a couple of whacks with a hammer, and then straight on dead center whacks. Usually by alternating hammer blows to the T handle and the center...the wheel will pop free.

    It is important to have the brake shoes adjusted away from the drum. Also, you need to instal the puller arms as evenly spaced as possible to insure a straight pull from the center bolt. If the wheel still won't budge, a little heat around the center hub with a regular propane torch probably wouldn't hurt anything.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC


    SDC member since 1975

  5. #5
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA.
    Posts
    11,046
    Here's that T handle that goes on the end of the puller that John mentioned...



    Often...even on cars that have NOT sat for 17 years...I have to beat on this T handle severely with a hand held sledge in order to pop the drum loose. I doubt if a wrench will do the job.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA


  6. #6
    President Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC, USA.
    Posts
    2,946
    Bang on the T handle until it absolutely won't move any more. Then bang on the end of the threaded rod one time and go get a beer or otherwise quit for the day. One more whack in the morning will probably pop it loose.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Home of Studebaker
    Posts
    2,046
    Quote Originally Posted by islesgw View Post
    2013-01-02_19-28-11_493.jpgI'm a new Studebaker owner. I bought a '62 Hawk. A real barn find that hasn't run in 17 years. The engine now runs good. I'm on to fixing the brakes. I've tried everything I can think of but I can not get the rear drums off. I need to know what the trick is.
    WELCOME ...to the SDC Forum!!!

    From the FWIW Dept...
    Go here; then read Post #18:
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ght=Plant+%232

  8. #8
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,966
    When you put the drum back on the axle after completing the brake job, do it like this:
    -Axle and hub are dry, with no lubrication. Some folks say chaulk is OK, other say no lube at all.
    -Push the drum on as par as possible by hand WITHOUT the key in place
    -insert the key so it is flush with the outside of the drum/hub. Insert the key so the taper on the key compliments the taper on the axle. In other words the taper on the key is towards the axle and towards the differential.
    -DON'T push the key into the hole
    -put the washer and the nut on the axle.
    -tighten the nut.

    You want the key to be as far out, away from the taper in the axle groove as possible.

    Many times, the previous "mechanic" put the key in backwards. or put it in before putting the drum/hub on the axle. That can break the hub, or even crack the axle, and it always makes removing the hub the next time much more difficult than it should be.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

  9. #9
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklet, GA, USA. Planet Earth
    Posts
    14,930
    Here's a pretty good video of a guy struggling with his Chrysler....
    You'll get the idea...
    He does not have the hammer anvil part, which really helps....
    (After getting it tight... HIT the end of the threaded rod...HARD)...
    Jeff


    Jeff



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  10. #10
    President Member Deaf Mute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eldridge, Iowa , USA.
    Posts
    1,155
    I gave up on one of my Studes several years back and left the puller on the hub (before I learned (the hard way) to leave the nut on the axle. Two days later when I went back to the shop, the hub and puller were laying on the floor... I could almost hear them laughing at me!
    Lesson learned... DON'T GIVE UP!

  11. #11
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Mechanicville, NY
    Posts
    2
    THANKS TO ALL for your ideas. IT WORKED! I was being way too gentle.
    It popped right off with a few well placed reapps with a big hammer.
    Gary

  12. #12
    President Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Union, CT., USA.
    Posts
    2,777
    Glad it went easy for you,though one day you'll get your chance at a back breaking drum " when you get your 2nd Studebaker " <G>
    Quote Originally Posted by islesgw View Post
    THANKS TO ALL for your ideas. IT WORKED! I was being way too gentle.
    It popped right off with a few well placed reapps with a big hammer.
    Gary
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  13. #13
    President Member 55s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Caledon East, ON, Canada.
    Posts
    1,121
    I have a 2 pullers, but usually use one. They are all excellent quality, but my "T" is actually damaged by the sledge hammer abuse it has taken over the years. I've had some real tough ones.

  14. #14
    Speedster Member Deadbodyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Lebanon PA
    Posts
    129
    yeh the rear drums on my 49 truck, were stuck good. with puller, hammer, and some gentle prying, the drum finally SHOT off. Me and my dad basically jumped out of the way, hahaha.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •