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Thread: How to fix a cracked steering wheel

  1. #1
    Champion Member Dudorino's Avatar
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    How to fix a cracked steering wheel

    I fixed my cracked old steering wheel on my 1957 Silver Hawk using POR15 epoxy putty. Here is a link to the video I made to show everyone how to do it.

    What do you think?

    1957 Silver Hawk. Located in Elkhorn, NE.

  2. #2
    President Member
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    That was great. I really appreciate how much work you put into restoring your steering wheel. You made it look easy.

    Rog
    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
    Smithtown,NY
    Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

  3. #3
    Speedster Member
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    Nice how-to. I used the same product and found it to work well. I also did one other thing that I saw on a youtube clip regarding steering wheel repair, and that was to drill small diameter holes into the walls of the cracks, at a 45 degree angle after hogging them out with the dremmel tool. Then, when you are pushing the epoxy into the hogged out crack, you also force epoxy into the small diameter holes you drilled into the walls of the crack, as well. This creates additional anchor points when the epoxy hardens and gives additional strength. I can't say for sure if it does add strength, or not, but it made sense so I did it. Didn't think it would hurt.

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    Chief Cat Herder showbizkid's Avatar
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    Tony, you rock! I am going to subscribe to your channel. You've really got a great screen presence and an easygoing demeanor that makes it look easy, as Rog said. You mind if I link up to you on my blog?

    Nice work!

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 Standard (F2) "Barney"
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Champion Member Dudorino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by showbizkid View Post
    Tony, you rock! I am going to subscribe to your channel. You've really got a great screen presence and an easygoing demeanor that makes it look easy, as Rog said. You mind if I link up to you on my blog?

    Nice work!
    Wow! Thanks for the great feedback. I'd be honored if you linked to me on your blog. Go for it! Thanks
    1957 Silver Hawk. Located in Elkhorn, NE.

  6. #6
    Champion Member Dudorino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s2dwagon View Post
    Nice how-to. I used the same product and found it to work well. I also did one other thing that I saw on a youtube clip regarding steering wheel repair, and that was to drill small diameter holes into the walls of the cracks, at a 45 degree angle after hogging them out with the dremmel tool. Then, when you are pushing the epoxy into the hogged out crack, you also force epoxy into the small diameter holes you drilled into the walls of the crack, as well. This creates additional anchor points when the epoxy hardens and gives additional strength. I can't say for sure if it does add strength, or not, but it made sense so I did it. Didn't think it would hurt.
    I was not aware of that technique. It does look like a better way to do it. I'll definitely do that on my next steering wheel repair.

    Thanks for the tip.
    1957 Silver Hawk. Located in Elkhorn, NE.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dudorino View Post
    I was not aware of that technique. It does look like a better way to do it. I'll definitely do that on my next steering wheel repair.

    Thanks for the tip.
    I haven't seen what the Por 2K cures like and am curious how pliable it is when cured. Is it a solid like JB weld or body filler or does it have some plasticity to it?

    Reason I ask is the 'How to's' I've seen called for the same cleaning and drilling techniques but I didn't see the logic of replacing a flexible material with a rigid one like JB. The stovebolt wheel I repaired was more like rubber than a solid acrylic so I used 3M 8081 (i think) panel adhesive which sets up much more like the original material in my estimation and less likely to re-crack (I hope).

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    Champion Member Dudorino's Avatar
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    POR15 sets up rock hard. I would not recommend it for a flexible steering wheel.

    I don't have a good recommendation for you. How about it, friends... What do you recommend?
    1957 Silver Hawk. Located in Elkhorn, NE.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Dudorino, I was just curious about the POR... I'll stick with the 3M 8081 for the flexible wheels then, covered with epoxy primer it should last as long as the original.

  10. #10
    Silver Hawk Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dudorino View Post
    POR15 sets up rock hard. I would not recommend it for a flexible steering wheel.

    I don't have a good recommendation for you. How about it, friends... What do you recommend?
    Tony

    Great video, I'm going to watch a number of them on Youtube. I also used the POR15 on several wheels and didn't think about the hole trick but I did undercut all of the repair areas so the filler was basically dovetailed into the areas.

    One I repaired was still in great shape when I sold the car two years ago, after being repaired 20 years prior to then.

    Excellent work, Bob
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