Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: rear disc brakes

  1. #1
    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    princeton mn
    Posts
    1,014

    rear disc brakes

    With so many cars using a dana 44 rear end is there any disc brake set ups that can or could be made to fit the studebaker rear housing ? Just thought maybe there is a factory set up that would be as good and cheaper to install than a after market set up. Would be a lot easier to get parts for to. Just go to napa and order what you need.

  2. #2
    Silver Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Spokane, WA, USA.
    Posts
    5,321
    Short answer, yes. A couple of kits, including the Steeltech from Dave Levesque, offered in the past used early GM Cadillac single piston disc calipers because they had an integral parking brake. As those too are long out of production, can't hardly buy them any more. Last I checked, they were a order-only item at NAPA.

    The question you didn't ask is do street-driven Studes really need rear disc brakes? I've done several rear disc conversions and couldn't tell it really improved the stopping power. Since a Stude carries almost sixty percent of the static weight on the front end, on a hard stop, the weight transfer requires the front brakes to do 80% of the work of stopping the car.

    FWIW, the Avanti is the worst and AC-equipped are the worst of the worst. Even with the stock front discs, on a hard stop, especially downhill, so much weight transfers to the front, the right rear will usually lock first. Not the best for stability.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

  3. #3
    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Brownsburg, IN, USA.(NW suburban Indianapolis)
    Posts
    16,779
    Well, you can go to NAPA and get most of the parts you need for a Turner Brake rear disc setup, but, of course, there are a few Studebaker-unique brackets and small parts you must buy from Jim at Turner Brake.

    See his business-card ad in any Turning Wheels. BP

  4. #4
    President Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Elkton, MD USA
    Posts
    1,278
    I have a set of Steeltech rear disk brake brackets, installation instructions and NAPA parts list if you are interested. I just never could justify the time and effort to install them. PM me it you want them.
    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT
    58 C Cab
    57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

  5. #5
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklet, GA, USA. Planet Earth
    Posts
    15,038
    I, too, have a Steeltech rear disc setup on my Ford rear end...
    Having said that, in the future, I would only put a Turner rear disc setup on my Dana 44 rear...


    Quote Originally Posted by Dan White View Post
    I have a set of Steeltech rear disk brake brackets, installation instructions and NAPA parts list if you are interested. I just never could justify the time and effort to install them. PM me it you want them.

  6. #6
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tinley Park, IL, USA.
    Posts
    841
    I got the Turner front and rear set up for my 76 Avanti. Fronts went on with no problems. The rear brackets would not fit on the axle housing ends as mine were a 6 bolt "U-shaped" type set up (3:31 TT) and the Turners were for a 4 bolt set up. I went to "plan B" and rebuilt the drum set up along with replacing all the brake lines and fluid.
    [SIGPIC]

  7. #7
    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    princeton mn
    Posts
    1,014
    sounds like rebuilt drum rears and disc brakes on the front is the way to go.

  8. #8
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,169
    One for a....yes on rear discs.

    I've got four wheel discs on my 54 Conestoga. I used Wilwood calipers (4 piston) at all four corners. The fronts have larger pistons than the rears.
    I'm using a double action master cylinder with no power booster.

    It's about the best stopping car I've ever owned.

    Mike

  9. #9
    Speedster Member Don Jeffers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
    I'm using a double action master cylinder with no power booster.

    It's about the best stopping car I've ever owned.

    Mike
    Mike

    Please tell more about your master cylinder. Make, model, placement etc?

    Thanks

  10. #10
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,169
    Don -

    Wilwood, tandom-remote
    Nuthin special. Just sized the caliper piston sq. in. to the master cyl. piston.
    http://www.wilwood.com/MasterCylinde...inderList.aspx
    Second from the bottom of page.

    Made up a bracket and mounted the cylinder in basically the OEM location, with all stock hard parts.
    A residual valve for both the front and rear.

    Most don't understand that by doing some quick, easy math, there's normally no need for a booster (for normal sized/weight cars anyway). Why the aftermarket (and factories) does it is beyond me..other than...it's the "normal" thing to do..!

    Mike

  11. #11
    Speedster Member Don Jeffers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    209
    Thanks for the good reply, Mike.

    I always thought my 53 Hdtp stopped nicely with the later 57 finned brakes all around and the original single circuit 53 MC.

    My 54 came with dual parallel MCs, not a tandem unit, and it requires a heavy foot. Obviously not sized properly.

    Good web site.

    Don

  12. #12
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    lafayette in
    Posts
    1,830
    I have adjusted brake hydraulics several times with good results. My old 71 bronco just didn't stop very well, so I did some research and bought one size larger wheel cylinders for the front wheels, and voila, great stopping power.

    My 74 mercedes 240d never stopped like it should. I had a newer model and 82 I think which stopped very nicely, so I subsitituted the larger front calipers from the newer model onto the older car and then it stopped just like the 82. It is not rocket science and the results can be startling. Changing tire sizes also has a big effect on braking performance.....larger tires less braking leverage....smaller more mechanical advantage. it is easily overlooked.

    I don't know how the heck those guys with those ridiculous 42" tires on their older caprices ever get them stopped....same with the huge tired 4 x 4's.

    Yikes!
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  13. #13
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    lafayette in
    Posts
    1,830
    Quote Originally Posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    I, too, have a Steeltech rear disc setup on my Ford rear end...
    Having said that, in the future, I would only put a Turner rear disc setup on my Dana 44 rear...
    I was searching just now and found Steeltech seems to be out of business...anybody have any info on them?
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  14. #14
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,169
    Two good reasons for rear discs -
    1. Living in a rainy states (Washington, Oregon, all points in the north east).
    2. Living in mountainous areas. Discs cool a lot better thAn drums do.

    Drag racing is a twofold proposition.
    1. Drums are normally lighter thAn "factory" type disc brakes. Most aftermarket rotors designed for drag racing are lighter thAn both factory disc and drum brakes.
    2. As in #2 above, drums get hot quick reducing their effect on continued passes down the 1/4 (1/8) mile. Most disc will greatly reduce that problem.

    Mike

    P.s. - "t", that's why you sometimes just have to do it yourself....

  15. #15
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    lafayette in
    Posts
    1,830
    PLus, when the drum heats up it expands away from the braking material, reducing its effectiveness. When a disc expands it expands toward the braking material. ...and disc brakes are much much easier to service than drums.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
    Two good reasons for rear discs -
    1. Living in a rainy states (Washington, Oregon, all points in the north east).
    2. Living in mountainous areas. Discs cool a lot better thAn drums do.

    Drag racing is a twofold proposition.
    1. Drums are normally lighter thAn "factory" type disc brakes. Most aftermarket rotors designed for drag racing are lighter thAn both factory disc and drum brakes.
    2. As in #2 above, drums get hot quick reducing their effect on continued passes down the 1/4 (1/8) mile. Most disc will greatly reduce that problem.

    Mike

    P.s. - "t", that's why you sometimes just have to do it yourself....
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  16. #16
    President Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Bullhead City, Arizona, USA.
    Posts
    1,848
    Me: I'm no big fan of rear disc brakes short of race cars and a few other applications. In fact: GM went back to rear drums on their 2005 up C1500 pickup trucks.
    --------------------------------------

    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •