Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: New Edelbrock 4 Bbl Carb Flooding Problem

  1. #1
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Roanoke , VA
    Posts
    10

    New Edelbrock 4 Bbl Carb Flooding Problem

    I recent installed a new 4bbl edelbrock (1406) carb on a factory 4bbl manifold on my 1960 lark 259 and I am having a problem with it flooding , it may be getting to hot too
    I can hear the gas bubbling in the carb after it gets hot , I installed an electric fuel pump at the tank with a pressure regulator and its running about 5 psi at idle
    My question is should I block off the heat riser since this carb has an electric choke

    I also have a 59 lark with a 62/63 289 in it with the exact same carb that runs great so thats why I choose this carb for my 1960

    I am going to ask Edelbrock too and see if they have and suggestions too

  2. #2
    President Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Chiang Mai, Thailand
    Posts
    571
    New Edelbrocks often need float adjustment.

  3. #3
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hawthorne, California, USA.
    Posts
    1,199
    Do not block off the heat riser as you can cause carb ice in cold weather if the heat riser is inop. I agree with Pat, sometimes the float level may need adjustment or a piece of dirt could have made its way into one of the needle valves which will not allow the valve to seal completely. Also I use three base gaskets betweem the carb and the manifold to keep heat away from the carburetor. Studebaker originally did that when the cars with AFB's were built. Bud

  4. #4
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklet, GA, USA. Planet Earth
    Posts
    14,634
    I disagree (about not blocking off the heat crossover passage).
    If you have an electric choke, and you block open, or remove the heat riser, you should have no icing problen unless you are diving the car 24/7/365 in the tundra.
    Sure, the car will take a bit longer to warm up, but the heat from the engine is plenty to keep the carb warm enough to prevent icing.
    Since a high percentage of our Studebakers are casual use in decent climates, the emphasis is usually for warm or hot running conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bud View Post
    Do not block off the heat riser as you can cause carb ice in cold weather if the heat riser is inop. I agree with Pat, sometimes the float level may need adjustment or a piece of dirt could have made its way into one of the needle valves which will not allow the valve to seal completely. Also I use three base gaskets betweem the carb and the manifold to keep heat away from the carburetor. Studebaker originally did that when the cars with AFB's were built. Bud

  5. #5
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklet, GA, USA. Planet Earth
    Posts
    14,634

    Lightbulb

    Before you tear it apart...
    When it is acting up on you....rap the carb top a few times with the plastic handle of a 6" long #2 blade screwdriver.
    (being specific for the tech nitpickers).
    I have seen a lot of Edelbrocks flood that just had crud in the needle and seat.
    A few taps/whacks to the carb top can jar loose some grit...sometimes.
    A 50/50 thing that cost's nothing to try.
    Checking the float level is a good idea too.
    Gives you an opportunity to look into the bathtub and see if there is any crud collecting in the bottom.

    5psi at idle is getting toward the top end of the acceptable pressure range (at idle).
    It might be that when the engine is 'at speed', the pressure range might be high enough to push the needles off the seats and cause flooding, or over rich condition.
    If your regulator is adjustable, you might try to lower the psi by a pound or two.

    Blocking off the heat crossover is a good idea, but remember to either block open, gut, or remove the heat riser valve under the RHS exhaust manifold.

    Have you downloaded, and read the Edelbrock owners/service manual?
    Excellent information there, even though it is a tad tedious to read.
    It is a 'must have' to get an Edelbrock into the ballpark....
    HTIH
    Jeff
    http://www.edelbrock.com/automotive_...ers_manual.pdf




    Quote Originally Posted by Crazystudebakerlady View Post
    I recent installed a new 4bbl edelbrock (1406) carb on a factory 4bbl manifold on my 1960 lark 259 and I am having a problem with it flooding , it may be getting to hot too
    I can hear the gas bubbling in the carb after it gets hot , I installed an electric fuel pump at the tank with a pressure regulator and its running about 5 psi at idle
    My question is should I block off the heat riser since this carb has an electric choke

    I also have a 59 lark with a 62/63 289 in it with the exact same carb that runs great so thats why I choose this carb for my 1960

    I am going to ask Edelbrock too and see if they have and suggestions too

  6. #6
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Roanoke , VA
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Crazystudebakerlady View Post
    I recent installed a new 4bbl edelbrock (1406) carb on a factory 4bbl manifold on my 1960 lark 259 and I am having a problem with it flooding , it may be getting to hot too
    I can hear the gas bubbling in the carb after it gets hot , I installed an electric fuel pump at the tank with a pressure regulator and its running about 5 psi at idle
    My question is should I block off the heat riser since this carb has an electric choke

    I also have a 59 lark with a 62/63 289 in it with the exact same carb that runs great so thats why I choose this carb for my 1960

    I am going to ask Edelbrock too and see if they have and suggestions too
    It should be noted that heat riser was replaced less than 2000 miles ago when dual exhaust was added and car is not driven in winter
    and fuel filter was added in the rear before the pump when the pump was added

  7. #7
    President Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Chiang Mai, Thailand
    Posts
    571
    From the manual's 'troubleshooting' section:

    Dirt/metal shavings between the needle and seat or a “sticking float”: To correct either of these problems, lightly tap the carburetor fuel inlet area with the handle of a
    screwdriver. If flooding continues, pinch the fuel line (if possible). Start the engine and let it run until it stops. Release line and restart engine. If flooding persists examine the needles,
    seats, float level, and float drop. Adjust or replace parts if necessary.

    As for blocking the heat crossover passage, doesn't that help with alcohol mix fuels? Seems like a hot carb doesn't like that stuff. I'll find out soon enough, my Daytona has an aftermarket aluminum manifold that was cast with the passage blocked.

    As regards fuel pressure, I'm running an Edelbrock 1791 electric fuel pump into an Edelbrock 1406 using 3/8 line all the way from the tank - Edelbrock specifically states that there's no need for a pressure regulator with that pump:

    1791: Features a 3/8” NPT inlet and 3/8” NPT outlet. 1791 has a free flow rate of 120 gallons per hour, flows 48 gallons per hour
    at 5.0 psi, and will support up to 600 horsepower. Fuel pressure is externally adjustable from 5 to 10 psi and is factory preset to
    6.5 psi. A fuel pressure regulator is not required when using the factory preset 6.5 psi fuel pressure.

  8. #8
    Commander Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Asheville NC
    Posts
    51
    When I put a new Edlebrock on the hawk it flooded and once I adjusted the floats worked just fine. Have also had them flood and just needed the needle and seat cleaned.

  9. #9
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Roanoke , VA
    Posts
    10
    I can not seem to locate a 1" plastic spacer , but I can find a .5" wood and the Mr Gasket 98
    Any advantage to the wood vs the 98 , or use both together ?? any thoughts on this ??

  10. #10
    President Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Dobson, NC, USA.
    Posts
    1,670
    I've used the wood. A one inch spacer may effect low end torque a little. I've also blocked the crossovers and cured all percolation and hesitation problems that I would experience as the outside temps went up.

    ErnieR

  11. #11
    Speedster Member Shane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Kennewick, Washington, USA.
    Posts
    162
    The edelbrock 1403 (500 CFM) is where it's at. 64 Cruiser with 289 just got one, runs like a new car that has a set


  12. #12
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Roanoke , VA
    Posts
    10
    What did you block the crossovers with ??

  13. #13
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklet, GA, USA. Planet Earth
    Posts
    14,634
    I cut thin pieces of stainless steel and use a good composite intake gasket.


    The stainless keeps the pulses and heat off the gasket.
    Simple. Keep it simple.
    Jeff

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazystudebakerlady View Post
    What did you block the crossovers with ??
    Jeff



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  14. #14
    President Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Dobson, NC, USA.
    Posts
    1,670
    I shaped some 3/16 metal stock to fit in the crossover port in the manifold then used my mig and tacked a couple of spots but anything to hold them in place during assembly would work even if it would melt away later. Reason being I also acquired a set of fiber gaskets through Dave Thibault that have no crossover hole. Using both the gaskets and the metal I was sure the crossovers would stay blocked. The gaskets alone might work for awhile but I have to think they would burn out over time without a solid metal backing in the manifold.

    Absolutely worth the effort.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •