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Thread: fuel line cleaning

  1. #1
    Speedster Member
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    fuel line cleaning

    What's the best way to clean out a partially solidified fuel line. Cars been sitting for over 40 years. Don't want to replace it.

  2. #2
    President Member
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    I never tried,so not really sure.honestly I think I'd replace it to be safe.
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  3. #3
    Speedster Member gearhead49's Avatar
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    I would replace it.
    Just use some brake line the same diameter.
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  4. #4
    President Member mapman's Avatar
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    I have cleaned gummed up lines using a piece of 1/8 inch steel cable mounted in a portable drill. Work it in slowly pulling it out often to clean it. Turn it with the twist as it goes in so it won't unravel if it catches. One of the problems with cleaning and using an old line that appears to be good is that they often rust from the inside out and fail later.
    Rob

  5. #5
    Commander Member
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    I droped my fuel line out of my 9-g , it came out in one section. I went to schucks and bought (6) 5/16 brake lines and some line connectors and layed them by the org. ones and bent them up over my knee and they fit great. Good luck, replacing is the only way to go for trouble free operation. RC

  6. #6
    Golden Hawk Member
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    It sounds to me like it would be more work to properly CLEAN a fuel line, than it would to just do it right and REPLACE it!

    Replacement lines are not expensive, and can be found in very easy to bend material now-days.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner



  7. #7
    Speedster Member
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    While replacing it would be easier my dad is one of those who isn't gunna get me a new part until I thoroughly try to make what I have work.

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member
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    That is a very good rule to learn for most repairable parts on Classic Cars, but not ALL parts, Fuel & Brake lines are one of the exceptions, they are not safely and long term repairable or worth the effort.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner



  9. #9
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I have had two instances in the past year where lines needed to be replaced on the Lark. The first occurred about a year ago or so after I think I had to some work on replace rubber fuel line with the high pressure fuel line. The steel line that comes up and over the axle hump sprouted a pinhole leak. What had happened was over the years the line rusted on the outside and the high pressure from the pump had finally caused the fuel to sprout a pinhole leak in the now thinning metal. The whole segment was replaced with new stainless fuel line. The second was about a couple months ago prior to leaving a gas station. The same thing happened to my rear brake line over the axle hump. The line had rusted out from the outside and the high pressure of the brakes caused my brake fluid to start spraying out from a pinhole leak that had developed. The whole section from the reservoir back was also replaced with new brake line. In either case there wasn't much in the way of warning until it actually happened.
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  10. #10
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    atom -

    Work...or flow of fuel...isn't the case here..."rust" is.
    You likely save yourself (your dad) a ton of headachs by just doing it right...replace it...!

    This come from a long time hot rodder that's tried everything...a few times.
    Plus what some have said above...AND my brothers 1940 Fords plugged up lines. After trying many things (he wanted them saved as they were original..!), he replaced them...!

    Mike

  11. #11
    President Member
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    atomicrm,aside from wondering what to do with the fuel lines? what condition might the gas tank be in???
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  12. #12
    President Member studebaker-R2-4-me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicrm View Post
    While replacing it would be easier my dad is one of those who isn't gunna get me a new part until I thoroughly try to make what I have work.
    Just bend it in half as you take it out to clean it, don't forget to say "oops" when the CASO is around too, Then get to cough up $10 for a new clean line, don't forget to charge him $150 for the labor saved for NOT rebuilding the carburator. Best of luck with your father.

    Allen

    1964 GT Hawk
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