Results 1 to 38 of 38

Thread: Studebaker trucks, how BIG?

  1. #1
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Petaluma, CA, USA.
    Posts
    279

    Question Studebaker trucks, how BIG?

    Hi All,

    I was talking to a fellow yesterday about his Sterling truck collection. Sterling made big commercial trucks in the early 1900s. Naturally the conversation got around to Studebaker trucks and I was asked the question "just how big of a commercial truck did Studebaker make?". I'm hoping some of you can shed light on the topic.

    Regards,
    John Brayton
    John Brayton

  2. #2
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Essex, ON, Canada.
    Posts
    121

    Re: How BIG?

    My 6E40 (seen in the signature below) is the largest offered by Studebaker in 1961 as a "stock" truck. It is a 23,000lb GVW truck on a 195" wheelbase. I know that longer wheelbases were available (212") mainly for school bus chassis but I do not believe there was anything approaching the level of a Class 7 or 8 vehicle in weight rating and that the range around 23,000 -24,000 lbs was their maximum. Tractors were rated up to 42,000lbs GCW (gross combination weight).

    Doug
    6E40-195 1963 Canadian Lark VY-6 4E2 Deluxe Scotsman

    Essex, Ontario, Canada

  3. #3
    Silver Hawk Member Milaca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Milaca, Minnesota, USA.
    Posts
    5,264
    Aside from the military 6 x 6 trucks, did Studebaker ever offer tandem axle trucks? Was a 4-71 GM diesel the largest diesel ever offered? Was an Allison automatic ever available?

    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

  4. #4
    President Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    South Bend,, In, USA.
    Posts
    548
    The 4-71 was to big for the E-45. They used the 4-53. Jim

  5. #5
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2
    Well I know that they made the US6 durning the war and it was a 2.5 ton truck
    I have one that I am working on right now.

    Ken

  6. #6
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    North Las Vegas, NV, USA.
    Posts
    152
    Doug got this one right. From a 1963 Service Letter with licensing information, the 8E40E and 8E45E show GVW as 24,000 and when used as a tractor-trailer combination, GVW increases to 42,000.

    Brent, I see dual rear wheels, but not tandem axles. I can send you a .pdf of the Service Letter if you want it. PM me if.

    Would commercial, as John asked, include military?

  7. #7
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Puget Sound, , USA.
    Posts
    2,837
    There is a 1955 Sales Letter announcing the FABCO (F.A.B. Mfg. Co.) Tandem Axle Conversion for E38 models.
    <img src=http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/image.php?u=376&type=sigpic&dateline=1407459320 border=0 alt= />

  8. #8
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Locust Grove, VA, USA.
    Posts
    555
    Hello friends; The information given above is accurate. To expand a little on John's questions and later comments, the 8E40 and 8E45's (gas and diesel) were the largest pure Studebaker trucks factory built after 1941. Wheelbases ran from about 131 inches to 212 inches. These trucks were rated nominally as 2 ton HD trucks. Studebaker never built a factory class 7 or 8 truck during this period. 1949 was the first year Studebaker built a 2 ton rated truck after WWII.

    Prior to 1941, Studebaker did build trucks in the 3 to 5 ton classes, not many, but they were factory built. The engines in these trucks were supplied by Waukasha. These trucks were built in the S, T, J and K series, both standard and cab-over configurations, from about 1930 to 1941.

    Studebaker never offered tandem axle trucks as standard or optional equipment from the factory on domestic trucks. Although some Studebaker trucks are around with dead and live tandem axles, they were after-market supplied. George Orphanidys, in Newport News, VA owns a 1958 3E38 tandem grain-bodied truck. I am not including military trucks in this part of the reponse

    Yes, Studebaker built (assembled military 2 1/2 ton trucks- nominally a 5 ton) during and after WWII. The US6 trucks were built 1941-1945 on standard military designed chassis with Studebaker sourced cabs and Hercules gas engines. Studebaker also built similiar trucks in the post-Korean Action into the mid-1960s. Again, these trucks were basically REO designed trucks built or assembled by the Studebaker factory. There were diesels and multi-fueled engines supplied by other manufacturers. No, military trucks would not be considered 'commercial' or 'trucks for domestic sale'.

    No, Studebaker never offered automatic transmissions on any of its larger trucks over the 1 ton rating either as standard or optional equipment.

    Will be glad to expound on any of this as I'm responding to John's inquiry off the top of my head. Right now I do not have ready access to all my books and truck brochures.

    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    60S-W6
    1948 M16-52 Boyer-bodied fire truck

  9. #9
    President Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Mokena, Illinois
    Posts
    2,915
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  10. #10
    President Member garyash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Dartmouth, MA, USA.
    Posts
    1,283
    Here's the M16 grain/vegetable hauler truck that originally belonged to Asa Hall's father. It had a tag axle installed.

    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

  11. #11
    President Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dalton, New York , USA.
    Posts
    952
    Hi

    What is the largest GVW rated truck equipped with the Champion Six as the base standard engine?

    Seems as if the Champion engine would be a might underpowered and overworked in that application.

    Steve

  12. #12
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Locust Grove, VA, USA.
    Posts
    555
    Thanks for that one, Richard. What a fantastic Studebaker!! Does anyone have any background information or knowledge of the original owner and use of this magnificant vehicle?

    Without looking for the information, I believe this is an 8E45-195 BBC as it came from the factory.

    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    not enough Studebakers, not enough room!

  13. #13
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Locust Grove, VA, USA.
    Posts
    555
    Thanks for the question, 56H-Y6. This should spark a little discussion.

    My take on this question is the 1941-42 M15-52 models. The M15 sat on a one ton nominally rated chassis with the standard 170 cu.in. six cylinder. The truck was equipped with a standard spur gear 4 speed manual transmission. There were no options offered at the factory for the engine or transmission. The 152 inch wheelbase was a wheelbase used for box vans, stakes, wreckers, flat beds, and sundry medium duty uses. This model was never offered after 1942 and I can understand why. That size truck, with a relatively heavy body and dual rear wheels, would present a major task for that little Champion engine to get underway and up to speed. (Speed?- we're talking 35mph tops, maybe!) What happened after putting a load on that truck is left to the imagination!

    The 1941-42 M15-52 is my nominee to answer your question. I have never figured why this model was ever offered. Perhaps to meet some competitive challenge presented by other manufacturers who had similiar underpowered models. This model perhaps would have survived in a urban area for a while, but not in rural America or on the open roads as a hauler. One man's opinion.

    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    60S-W6
    1948 M16-52 Boyer-bodied fire truck
    about a dozen 'relaxed' Studebakers on the hilltop

  14. #14
    President Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Garner, NC, USA.
    Posts
    1,096
    Quote Originally Posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
    Hi

    What is the largest GVW rated truck equipped with the Champion Six as the base standard engine?

    Seems as if the Champion engine would be a might underpowered and overworked in that application.

    Steve
    The Champion engine is a great little engine but I think it would underpowered and overworked in ANY truck.
    Jeff DeWitt
    http://carolinastudes.net

  15. #15
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wappingers Falls, New York, USA.
    Posts
    14,383
    Quote Originally Posted by garyash View Post
    Here's the M16 grain/vegetable hauler truck that originally belonged to Asa Hall's father. It had a tag axle installed.

    For those that don't know, that box above the cab was the sleeping quarters. Asa's father had the extra axle added to the truck.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  16. #16
    Silver Hawk Member Milaca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Milaca, Minnesota, USA.
    Posts
    5,264
    Quote Originally Posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
    This truck would look great with a 15 foot long gravel box and one pusher axel (air-lift tag). Any chance a 6-92 GM diesel could be shoehorned into this truck?
    It appears to have a heavy duty front axel judging by the 10 lug nuts holding the wheel on (as compared to 5 on other Stude trucks). Oh, here's a challenge for Mr. Quinn....can you find a photo of a tandem axel Studebaker truck with a Champ cab?? Anything is possible, right?
    Last edited by Milaca; 06-27-2010 at 09:50 PM.

    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

  17. #17
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Duncan, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,368

    Lightbulb 3e48

    Other than military production, I think the 1957/58 - 3E48 series would have had the highest GVW of a production Studebaker truck. IIRC, they came with a set of dual tandem axles at the rear and were considered a "3 ton" classification. There's a small write up about them in the Jan. 96 TW, but no photos.
    Mark Hayden
    '57 Transtar Deluxe
    '66 Commander

    Regional Manager
    British Columbia


    http://studebaker.ca/ - BC Coastal Chapter
    www.bcsouthintsdc.ca - BC Southern Interior Chapter
    http://visdc.shawwebspace.ca/ - Vancouver Island Chapter

  18. #18
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Locust Grove, VA, USA.
    Posts
    555
    Hey Milaca; I don't believe a 6-92 GM could be shoehorned into this one. The old 4-63 GM was a tight squeeze! Yes, the front axle was replaced by Mr. Hall when he converted the truck to a tandem.

    The truck started out as a 1946 M16-52 with the standard 225 cu. in. Commander Six. This truck was nominally rated as a 1 1/2 ton truck from the factory. It had the HD package which included factory fish plates, 2 speed axle, HD springs and shocks, brake booster behind the Hydrovac. Mr. Hall bought this truck after the close of WWII to haul produce from NJ to CT. By the early '50s, he needed more truck as business was growing and there was more demand for his services. As he was quite accomplished with his hands and knew quite a bit about metal working and mechanics, he decided to upgrade the 'Bumble Bee' (it's nickname in the family) rather than buy a new 2R series two ton truck. Therefore, this truck is not 'factory original' in many ways. It was modified to do more work. Modifications included the trailing tandem axle, the heavy duty front axle, shocks and brakes from another manufacturer, larger and more powerful rear braking system, a later M series front bumper, and the newer 245 cu. in. Commander engine (I believe the engine number is for a 1950 2R). It is as no other '46 M series! The truck is owned now by a truck collector/museum in the New England area.

    Asa Hall, the son, has recounted many tales riding and, later, driving for his dad on many trips to NJ and MD during his teenage years. Most trips including running through NYC. The truck was used as a produce hauler into the 1960's. Yes, both men could sleep in the overhead compartment. Asa stated that during the summer they burned up and in the winter, they froze. Spring and fall were nice. This truck is a sight to see in the flesh.

  19. #19
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ferndale, WA, USA.
    Posts
    17,271
    Quote Originally Posted by Milaca View Post
    /Cut/Oh, here's a challenge for Mr. Quinn....can you find a photo of a tandem axel Studebaker truck with a Champ cab??/Cut/
    NOW you're pushing it Milaca, since they only built ONE med. Duty 1 ton Champ Truck with even Dual wheels!
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner



  20. #20
    President Member studeclunker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Lewiston, California, USA.
    Posts
    4,733
    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    For those that don't know, that box above the cab was the sleeping quarters. Asa's father had the extra axle added to the truck.
    In the trade, that's called a 'Coffin Sleeper.' I don't know how anyone could use one of those.

  21. #21
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Collegedale, TN
    Posts
    3
    I recently purchased a 7E45E in the Ft. Wayne, IN area. It was part of a fleet of 16 diesel Studebakers. There were
    6 semi's and 10 tandem dump trucks. All were used to haul road material. The firm was Radabaugh Trucking.
    I believe that an article was written about this firm, with pictures in the fall of '62 or early '63. It was a trade
    publication of the Associates, a financing unit now part of Citi Group. I very much want to find this article.
    Any information on this fleet is greatly desired. Pictures also.

  22. #22
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Duncan, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,368

    Exclamation Pics

    Quote Originally Posted by 8E15 View Post
    I recently purchased a 7E45E in the Ft. Wayne, IN area. It was part of a fleet of 16 diesel Studebakers. There were 6 semi's and 10 tandem dump trucks.
    Well "8E15", it would be nice to see some pics of your new acquisition! From your signature line maybe some pics of a 1 ton as well....
    Mark Hayden
    '57 Transtar Deluxe
    '66 Commander

    Regional Manager
    British Columbia


    http://studebaker.ca/ - BC Coastal Chapter
    www.bcsouthintsdc.ca - BC Southern Interior Chapter
    http://visdc.shawwebspace.ca/ - Vancouver Island Chapter

  23. #23
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    North Las Vegas, NV, USA.
    Posts
    152
    8E15, was the one you bought the only one surviving? I could love a Studebaker dumper.

  24. #24
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Locust Grove, VA, USA.
    Posts
    555
    Hi Mark; I will stay with my original post that the 8E40 and 8E45 models were the largest Studebaker, factory built, catalogued models for domestic sale. The 3E48 was not a Studebaker catalogued model produced for domestic sale. The 3E48 was built to foreign specifications and, if any were built beyond the prototype, they were assembled elsewhere, not on Studebaker's factory assembly line. I can not get to my stash of old TW (of which I have a complete set) to check the Jan. 96 issue. Just operating on a faulty memory.



    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    60S-W6
    1948 M16-52 Boyer-bodied fire truck

  25. #25
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Duncan, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,368

    Lightbulb Here is the Article

    Quote Originally Posted by studelark View Post
    Hi Mark; I will stay with my original post that the 8E40 and 8E45 models were the largest Studebaker, factory built, catalogued models for domestic sale. The 3E48 was not a Studebaker catalogued model produced for domestic sale. The 3E48 was built to foreign specifications and, if any were built beyond the prototype, they were assembled elsewhere, not on Studebaker's factory assembly line. I can not get to my stash of old TW (of which I have a complete set) to check the Jan. 96 issue. Just operating on a faulty memory.

    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    Hi back Frank; I am certainly no expert on 3E48's, but I have attached a copy of the article for one and all to see. I would say they were a true Studebaker truck, although they were built for export. Just to throw a monkey wrench into the works, wouldn't a 4E40 truck be technically bigger than an 8E40 since they could be had with a 212" wb whereas the 8E40's maxed out at a 195" wb??
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Mark Hayden
    '57 Transtar Deluxe
    '66 Commander

    Regional Manager
    British Columbia


    http://studebaker.ca/ - BC Coastal Chapter
    www.bcsouthintsdc.ca - BC Southern Interior Chapter
    http://visdc.shawwebspace.ca/ - Vancouver Island Chapter

  26. #26
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Collegedale, TN
    Posts
    3
    Mark and others,

    Here is a little more info on the 2 trucks I have. The one ton 8E15 was sold in Nashville, Tn and used as a utilty
    truck for a construction firm. Sold to a farmer and 24" added to the frame. 131 to 154. He never got a farm bed
    built so I plan to add a flat bed and keep the added length.

    The 7E45E was a 143" BBC unit. Was also sold to a farmer and lengthed with tandems added. Plan to return to
    original and add a fifth wheel.

    Both look like they spent several years in a barn yard. TRUE. But hope to have both in South Bend in '12.

    Bert

  27. #27
    Silver Hawk Member JRoberts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC, .
    Posts
    5,846
    Speaking of trucks in a recent, non-Ingerstate trip I saw what I believe was an 8E of some sort on U.S. 52 somewhere between Poplar Camp and Wytheville, Virginia. It did not look like it had been moved for quite some time. I did not have the opportunity to stop to take a picture.
    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

  28. #28
    President Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Mokena, Illinois
    Posts
    2,915


    How about this one?
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  29. #29
    President Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Mokena, Illinois
    Posts
    2,915
    Quote Originally Posted by studelark View Post
    Thanks for that one, Richard. What a fantastic Studebaker!! Does anyone have any background information or knowledge of the original owner and use of this magnificant vehicle?

    Without looking for the information, I believe this is an 8E45-195 BBC as it came from the factory.

    Frank Drumheller
    Locust Grove, VA
    not enough Studebakers, not enough room!
    This and a 2nd identical truck was sent to Hub Studebaker in Riverbank, California. Serials E45-1050 and E45-1051. The conversion was performed by the Hendrickson Mfg. Company of Burr Ridge, Illinois. They extended the frames 29 1/2” and installed their Series RT320 (32,000# Cap.) tandem suspension. Eaton 30DTA axles with 6.14/8.55 gear ratio, drive lines, 10 stud Budd hubs and drums. The front axle was rated at 7,000 lbs. Completed August 1, 1963. Sorry I do not know who the actual purchaser was.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  30. #30
    Silver Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    , , Canada.
    Posts
    9,786
    Quote Originally Posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
    This and a 2nd identical truck was sent to Hub Studebaker in Riverbank, California. Serials E45-1050 and E45-1051. The conversion was performed by the Hendrickson Mfg. Company of Burr Ridge, Illinois. They extended the frames 29 1/2” and installed their Series RT320 (32,000# Cap.) tandem suspension. Eaton 30DTA axles with 6.14/8.55 gear ratio, drive lines, 10 stud Budd hubs and drums. The front axle was rated at 7,000 lbs. Completed August 1, 1963.
    ....And it will still fit inside my garage! That's the first I've heard of Hendrickson supplying any components and modifying a Studebaker truck to accomodate them. Hendrickson is still a major truck component supplier in the trucking industry.

    Craig

  31. #31
    President Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Mokena, Illinois
    Posts
    2,915
    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    ....And it will still fit inside my garage! That's the first I've heard of Hendrickson supplying any components and modifying a Studebaker truck to accomodate them. Hendrickson is still a major truck component supplier in the trucking industry.

    Craig


    Well there is obviously a gap in your big truck education! You were probably also unaware of this sales flier issued by Hedrickson?
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  32. #32
    Silver Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    , , Canada.
    Posts
    9,786
    Quote Originally Posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post

    Well there is obviously a gap in your big truck education! You were probably also unaware of this sales flier issued by Hedrickson?
    You're RIGHT!! I havn't seen that one before!

    However, I have seen the Detriot Diesel Service Letter to their authorized service agents announcing that Studebaker was starting to install 4-53's in their trucks.

    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 07-06-2010 at 02:00 PM.

  33. #33
    President Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Oregon, Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,633
    [creak of saddle leather]
    Now that right there
    [spits--ting!]

    is Truck Drivin'.

    Avanti R3672 "R-two-and-a-half"
    1953 M47 6X6 "two-and-a-half tons don't bend the first spring leaf"

  34. #34
    Silver Hawk Member Milaca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Milaca, Minnesota, USA.
    Posts
    5,264
    This is all very interesting to me as I've driven tandem axle gravel trucks since I was 17 years old, all of which had Hendrickson twin-screw walking beam rearends (begining with a 1969 Ford F-8000 with rubber puck suspension and a 5 plus a 4 speed transmissions). When I see these pictures of tandem axel Studebakers, they are begging for a 14 or 15 foot long gravel box. However with the choice of engines that Studebaker had, I wouldnt want to drive one with a full load of gravel. Simply not enough power. Did anybody offer engine upgrades for Studebaker trucks? An 855 cubic inch Cummins would have been a very nice upgrade!

    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

  35. #35
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Petaluma, CA, USA.
    Posts
    279
    Wow, ask a question and you get a "few" answers! This thread may continue but thanks to all for my education.

    Regards,
    John Brayton
    John Brayton

  36. #36
    President Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Mokena, Illinois
    Posts
    2,915
    Quote Originally Posted by John Brayton View Post
    Wow, ask a question and you get a "few" answers! This thread may continue but thanks to all for my education.

    Regards,
    John Brayton
    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1278485811
    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1278485976

    Wanna see more big trucks??
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  37. #37
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Aurora, Illinois, USA.
    Posts
    3,949
    Yall are not going to believe this, but with that Hendrickson ad, if I take off my glasses, tandem axle Studebaker beasts starts to resemble the 80's short haul Macks I used to see in my youth. .
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  38. #38
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Duncan, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,368

    Thumbs up Excellent!

    Thanks Richard!
    Mark Hayden
    '57 Transtar Deluxe
    '66 Commander

    Regional Manager
    British Columbia


    http://studebaker.ca/ - BC Coastal Chapter
    www.bcsouthintsdc.ca - BC Southern Interior Chapter
    http://visdc.shawwebspace.ca/ - Vancouver Island Chapter

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •