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Thread: 1951 Studebaker 2 R16 Truck

  1. #1
    route66
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    1951 Studebaker 2 R16 Truck

    I have a client that is trying to establish a reserve price for his 1951 Studebaker 2 R16 Truck. The vehicle is in excellent condition and matching numbers. I have looked around at several sites and all the trucks that I have seen are in rough condition or wrong year.

    I figured I would go to the experts.

    Thanks for your help

    Shane

  2. #2
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    quote:Originally posted by route66

    I have a client that is trying to establish a reserve price for his 1951 Studebaker 2 R16 Truck. The vehicle is in excellent condition and matching numbers. I have looked around at several sites and all the trucks that I have seen are in rough condition or wrong year.

    I figured I would go to the experts.

    Thanks for your help

    Shane
    Unfortunately, the big trucks don't bring the big bucks. You really can't "drive" them due to low speed, marginal brakes, and rough ride, not to mention hard to handle in an urban area (length, slow steering). They are tough to store. You need a barn or a special built garage (RV style). They are tougher than a car to work on unless you have the right (big and special) tools. Some parts are hard to find for the big trucks, and some parts (tires) are expensive. Although a lot of us love the old trucks, not many of us would pony up for one. This really limits the market and the price. Matching numbers will do nothing for the value of an old truck (unlike a Corvette ).

    Here's a friend's similar truck (1953)...



    He couldn't get $5k for this truck when he wanted to sell it, and it has the rare, short 131" wheelbase and 10,000 original miles. (He has since decided to keep it.)

    If the "reserve price" is for the purposes of an eBay auction, the reserve would have much more to do with the seller's willingness to sell the truck than a guess at market value. A "no reserve" eBay listing will decide the market value of the truck if the ad is well written and there are plenty of pictures. The seller needs to determine the value to HIM...the number where he'd rather keep the truck than get what the market would pay for it. That number should probably be well under $5k if he doesn't just want to pay eBay's listing fees.

    Just my 2 cents worth. Others may have very different opinions. A picture or two might help, and might spark some interest here.

    -Dick-


  3. #3
    Golden Hawk Member Roscomacaw's Avatar
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    I think Dick's outlined the case for these old workhorses very well. IF you can personally make use of one, then that might justify owning one. But just as a hobby thing - not very practical - and "hobby things" aren't usually "practical" to start with!
    Top speed's gonna be in the 50+MPH range, ride is tough on your backside (and your head - if you're very tall!) although, since they were designed to carry a load, they're better riding when well loaded.
    Then, as Dick mentioned, tires are about $200 apiece last I checked[xx(] - not that you'll go thru many over time. and storage is another thing. They're tall - and that limits them from many standard garages even if said garage is deep enough to swallow the trucks length.
    A fair number of these old beasts end up doing promotional work for some company. A taste of days gone by with the company logo painted on the doors. There's a lumber company, here in town, that has a 1932 International 1&1/2ton that does nothing but promote the lumber company.

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

  4. #4
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    Mr. B, since you already own a Transtar, you have a real appreciation for the value of such a vehicle. I can't help but wonder though if perceptions are different when the truck mentioned at the top would be known to the antique truck clubs. Perhaps these folks would place a different or even higher value on this truck. Just wondering.
    Rog

  5. #5
    Golden Hawk Member Roscomacaw's Avatar
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    You know - it's like anything else. The KEY to establishing value is having previous sales to refer to.
    The key to having those sales to refer to (at optimal value) is for the seller to find the niche where his offering elicts the most intense interest. This would be at the oppisite end of the spectrum from a refridgerator salesman going door-to-door in a neighborhood of igloos.[)]
    Supply & Demand. Each drives the other. It's just the magic of making the two discover one another.
    BTW, I sold my unrestored (but driveable) 2R17 for $1400 a few years ago. Had I known how badly the guy wanted one, I could have asked for more. As it was, the price I quoted him over the phone had a couple hundred factored in for an anticipated price cut.[8)] And yet, he showed up - walked around it once and said, "I'll take it!"

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

  6. #6
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    Try the Studebaker Truck Talk site as well.

    http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885/

  7. #7
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    quote:Originally posted by studeroger

    Mr. B, since you already own a Transtar, you have a real appreciation for the value of such a vehicle. I can't help but wonder though if perceptions are different when the truck mentioned at the top would be known to the antique truck clubs. Perhaps these folks would place a different or even higher value on this truck. Just wondering.
    Rog
    Stude trucks don't bring big bucks in the American Truck Historical Society either. Most of their members seem to focus on class 8 vehicles: Kenworth, Peterbilt, International, Mack, Brockway, Diamond T, etc. And even then, asking prices tend to be very low except for fully restored vehicles -- a reflection of how expensive they are to restore (even though authenticity is usually not much of an issue).

    Skip Lackie
    54 3R6 pickup
    59 4E40 flatbed
    64 Daytona hardtop
    74 Avanti II

  8. #8
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    With so little to go on, I would value the truck in the $2000 to $5000 range (if excellent is the same to you as it is to me). If you are talking about a reserve for an auction, just set that at the lowest amount that you would be willing to part with the truck for (not trying to be wise). Let the auction method establish the true market value.

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