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Thread: My Street Version Port Injection for the '55

  1. #401
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Cool!!

    On a separate project, I got the crankcase evacuation system installed today. I have the bungs and check valves installed down by the frame rails. I used the stock breathers and the fill cap holes, but removed the stock breathers, that way I'm not cutting any new holes in the valve covers. The breathers used a pair of ordinary grommets, which I cut down, and added additional grommets to. In short, I can still use the fill caps and breathers, but I modified the grommets so I can still use them as I did in an ordinary application:







    How's it work? Well, it isn't blowing any more or less oil out of the tailpipe. It sounds just as healthy as it did before, except the crankcase fumes are being routed through the tailpipe, instead of through the engine bay with the open breathers or the PCV valve(of which is still installed in the intake tube. I don't have a traditional exhaust system on the car, it's an X pipe with a pair DIY 24 inch ratrod baffles installed into the tips, with some DIY valves and levers to function as cutouts, so I wouldn't say there was really any real restrictions to hamper the operation any. Here's a video of the vehicle in operation......

    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  2. #402
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    Dunno wuza matter with that specific movie-system, as soon as I click on it & it almost starts to show there's something else spam-style pop'n up...

    Anyway, I reckon it's get'n quite cramped ventilation-wise under your hood & you might get heating-problems such as warped exhaust manifolds & hatever if you don't start thinking 'bout air-escapes, going up in speed on the highway on a warm summer day might give you unpleasant surprises...
    Louvers or (as I did on my -62 Fury) just drilled holes does the trick.
    (Then comes the thing with rain-evacuation...)
    I drilled 5 1-inch holes in each of the relatively right & left upper/rear corners & that also(!) made the car ride better from 160 km/hour & up; less frontal lifts & straighter ride all together.
    (This I also have to do on my daily-driver-472Cad now since there's a Caddy-standard: warped exhaust manifolds)

  3. #403
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    That's odd, it should jump right to the photobucket site, and it should autoplay without any sort of spam. However, knowing how photobucket redesigned their whole site in the last few months, this sort of behavior doesn't surprise me in the least......

    As far as heat, I'll see how that plays out. Those engine compartments were not really roomy from the getgo, but I can assure you that this is the last few bits under there. There is no real room for anything big under there after this, unless I start cutting out firewalls, and removing inner fenders(which would also remove any protection from rain, snow, or salt). After this, anything I do will be involving dressing things up, hehehe . I'm well acquainted with an overheating 289. When I first got my Lark with the R2, I did everything possible to alleviate the overheating on that vehicle, and it was a driver. It could have been described as an ongoing battle with that vehicle. It started with the water pump, moved up to a viscous fan, then the biggest fan Studebaker had, and finally fan shroud and recored radiator. On more than a few occasions, it spent it's time at the 3/4 mark on the temperature gauge, and on a couple of rare occasions, all the way over on the temperature gauge, because the thermostat stuck shut. That's a separate story in of itself when that happened. I've never had any warped exhaust manifolds, for the most part because they're cast iron, but it did bake the engine, which resulted in me losing my original thin headgaskets on the engine, and when I had the thermostat stick shut, it did cause two of my cylinders to get a couple of nice score marks in the piston bores. Amazingly enough, these events happened around 2004-2005, and I drove it as my primary means of transportation up until 2012. The engines run, as though nothing happened, except it may lose a little oil every now and then. Them engines may get hot, and I would recommend keeping them cool without a doubt, but they're rather tough little buggers under those conditions.

    I also have some extra help under there. The turbos are both water cooled, so they have water circulating through them all the time. Coupled to the heater core in the firewall and under the seat, and depending on the condition of the radiator(hopefully I got it completely flushed out when I put it in), there's quite a bit more water being circulated under there, so I'm not as concerned about heat yet. But, as I said, we'll see what shakes out whenever I get it onto the street.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  4. #404
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    While I was under there, I pulled the valve covers loose to repaint. What used to be a bright red, now looked more like a bad Jackson Pollock painting, as they've been removed a few times, and getting pretty scuffed in the process. So I pulled them off, replaced the gaskets, also replaced the valve cover that was smashed, and they came out looking a little better.....







    I picked up my wheel cylinder this morning(and some POR-15 for the Daytona!) from NAPA, so I put it on this afternoon, bled it a few times, moved the master cylinder adjustment nut out a few notches as it wouldn't release, and I do believe I have brakes again, so all that's left is putting the wheel back on, on that side!!
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  5. #405
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Abominable(or not) side project of the day :





    I was always enthralled by the look the Audi's put out with those molded headlamps, and that ring of lights around them, as they make the car look a little more aggressive. I bought a kit from Walmart with a couple strips of these little squirts around Christmas, and I got them installed today. They are pretty neat. They are a set of SMD mounted LED's on a strip with wire, a switch, and a battery. I ditched the wire and switch, and mounted them just behind the parking lamp lenses on the '55. They're small enough that they slip in front of the reflector, but behind the lens. I measured what I needed, and I cut off the rest of the strip, which is a circuit encased in molded plastic. I wired them into a separate switch in my console, and the rest is history. The interesting thing is due to their size, they disappear behind the lens when they're off, so most people wouldn't know they were there. Of course, due to the color, and to include the disclaimer in this instance, exhibition display only.....
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  6. #406
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I had a minor upgrade to fix a minor problem today, although it may just relieve it, hehe....
    Anyway I think I got a little lazy in putting my trunk mounted battery in a few years ago, because I just ran a regular sized 12 volt grounding cable to the frame. I used 2 gauge cable and copper connectors to put the positive side, to the starter together, but I used regular sized, Avanti cable from our parts stash, when I grounded the batter to the frame. I had also used some fairly long stuff too, as it was terminated through a long bolt in the frame, right behind the driver's door. Well, to alleviate some of the starting problems with the 6 volt starter, I pulled the old cable out, and using what I had left over from that project, I made up a shorter, fatter cable, that terminated just above the axle hump under the trunk. I used a pair of Channel Locks to crimp it, and a torch to tin the copper on the wire, and the connector. I ran it up into the same spot in the battery box, and so far, so good. How does it work? Well, everything is now matching, and it still starts as it did before.





    The cable on the left is what came out. It has smaller strands, and is alot more flexible. The cable on the right is the tractor cable from Farm and Fleet. It is 2 gauge, and is very stiff. Once it was soldiered, it didn't flex at all on the copper connection side.



    Oh, and if anyone forgot, the whole car was converted to 12 volts by yours truly. The big ol' Delco starter does quite well on 12 volts, with only needing brushes so far. And yes, even 12 volt systems can benefit from larger cables like the 6 volt systems, especially since I'm running a high powered Optima Red Top. The smaller cable doesn't help it any, as it behaves like a giant resistor when the vehicle is cranked, so it doesn't deliver the full amperage from the Optima. This situation also stands true to the old adage for electrical wires, "For the least amount of resistance, bigger and shorter is better".
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  7. #407
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    With all the work you've done, and how close it appears to be. Aren't you getting anxious to hit the streets? How long do you think till you'll scaring the town folk with that beast?
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  8. #408
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Not really no. It still needs some major items, like tires, headliner, and most importantly of all, registration, licensing, and insurance. The rims and tires on it now, were on my Lark when I bought them in 1999, which are American Racing Torq Thrust rims, and now some very old BF Goodrich Radial TA's. The headliner isn't as big of an issue, but the really big elephant in the room is the legal stuff. Illinois is a real stickler for registration, and I'm not in a neighborhood where I can just "drive it around the block" either. I think really busy, main thoroughfare of a rural road, describes it best, hehe. I don't have a whole lot of money or employment yet to really get those things finished yet, so I'm biding my time, and picking at the car at this point. I'm also redoing some things to make them a little better than they were before, which is where the things like the bumpers, cables, and airbox fall into that category.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  9. #409
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    On the discussion of suspended pedals in the last few days, I decided to "go for the gold", and put one in the '55. The throttle body on the intake manifold is cable actuated, and up until this point, was operated by a hybrid mechanical linkage/cable driven setup. It worked, but it was snappy. It was either all off, or all on, so I decided to see if I can feather the pedal with only a light touch. So we'll see how it works out. The pedal came out of one of our old K body Blazers, and I took the cable with it intact. It looks like there's enough to poke through the firewall, but we'll see .....



    My old floor mounted pedal and cable.....


    My suspended pedal setup. The cable is in the car.


    The void where the old pedal used to reside.......
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  10. #410
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I fabricated a couple of brackets and installed the cable today. The other half will poke through the firewall using the plastic clip on the cable. There's nothing to it, just a simple yank on the cable, and I have a little more control over the throttle body, so we'll see how it goes. So far, so good .........

    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  11. #411
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I have most of the suspended pedal completed. If you've ever wanted to know what a suspended gas pedal looks like in a C/K, well here ya go!!



    The cable that goes to the throttle body....


    It still needs some adjustment, or some spacing from the firewall, because the rod on the pedal hits the floor all too soon. Max speed is probably 30 mph, since the throttle body is only a 1/4 or 1/2 open when the pedal is fully floored! That's no good!!
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  12. #412
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    I know someone scrapping out a similar year suburban cause he wants it's heart. Hmmmm makes me wonder.....
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  13. #413
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Just to make sure everyone's on the same page, this is a customized solution to a very weird problem. The throttle body has a cable fitting, but the linkage on the block was still stock, even the floor mounted pedal. Originally, to circumvent the issue, I devised an extension to the old linkage, that extended off of the top of the linkage attached to the block, and operated a pull cable. It worked, but it was a bit of a Rube Goldberg apparatus. The pedal pushed down to the floor, which pushed on the rod, which twisted the rod attached to the block, pulling back on the linkage at the top of the block, and thereby pulling back on the cable. It worked, but it had a catch. It wasn't touch the pedal and go, more like, give the pedal a little gas and go. I wanted to feather the pedal, so I grabbed the cable setup off of our '77 Blazer, and affixed it to the '55. It still needs some adjusted, one of which being that the rod to the pedal, bottoms out before the throttle body is fully open, so I'm going to need to space the mounting plate on the firewall, away from the firewall with some extra spacers to give the pedal rod some clearance.

    To that end, I say, if you wanna do the same, your results may vary.....
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  14. #414
    President Member Corley's Avatar
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    I used the suspended throttle pedal from my S-15 on the '53, and found I could just bend the throttle rod a little to get all the throw needed. Works great, and was super easy to install. I think it is identical to what you installed, but I mounted it a tad higher and didn't cut the bottom of the pedal off. I also used the S-15 suspended brake pedal setup, but had to swap out the booster for a 7", and the original 11" booster was too big for an easy mount.
    Corley

  15. #415
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Yeah, that pedal is from a stock '77 Blazer. Nothing was altered to the pedal itself, so that's the original length on that pedal. Anyway, today I managed to get the cable straightened out. I have it now where it will go full throttle when the pedal goes to the floor. I solved that by taking two 3/16 plates, drilling the holes through the plates, stacking them on top of each other on the floorboard, and running some machine screws and nuts through them. The plates offset the pedal from the firewall, so the rod won't hit the floor at full throttle. After that, I disassembled some of the bracketry up front, for paint, which I'll get to later on. Here's the highlights from today....


    The plates are behind the pedal on the firewall......



    The throttle body also has an additional return spring(s) so it fully retracts. The return springs came from our '85 Oldsmobile....



    How did it work out so far? I'd say, so far, so good!!


    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  16. #416
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I started reassembling things back together again today. I have to still plug the hole where the rubber boot and floor pedal linkage poked through. The results are better than how it used to operate. I can feather the throttle out, and hold it at a particular RPM, as well as wind the car out, compared to the other pedal. With the other pedal, I had to give it a slight push to twist the mechanical linkage back and "pull on the string", and then it would open up as it should. This presented some problems, especially as the vehicle is a manual. Anyway, here's some photos and a video from today's highlights....






    The video from today's highlights....
    Last edited by PlainBrownR2; 08-11-2013 at 11:33 PM.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  17. #417
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Today, just to have a little fun, I took a drive around the yard. The suspended pedal worked flawlessly, even 10X better than the pedal I had! I need to do something with the X pipe underneath, because it wants to cut furrows on anything that's elevated! Other than that, the car has some real fine road manners! Here's a video of today's highlights....

    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  18. #418
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    Now you just need to get the title figured out. Hey I was talking to a friend that is building a V8 blazer. He bought a a late eighties suburban for it's motor and I was wondering if you thought that this same pedal setup could be adapted onto stude V8 with a carb as well. The truck has TBI
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  19. #419
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Yeah, no kidding. That and tires, it needs better wheels and tires. I have some 16X7 Ford Mustang rims for it, just need to get tires for them. Anyway, the cable setup....with the setup that I pulled from our Blazer, there really wasn't a whole lot to it. The bracket attaches to the firewall, and the pedal is a bent rod with which the pedal is attached to. If he wants to use the TBI, and it requires a provision for a cable assembly, he'll have to do some experimenting with aligning the cable. I had to play around a little bit with aligning the cable and the pedal. I mounted the pedal to the firewall, and then where the cable affixes to the pedal. Make sure where he mounts it, has sufficient swing to the firewall, and that it can swing from open to close. There's a tiny hole with a rod that pokes through where the rod pivots at on the bracket, which aligns the height of the pedal, and mounts the pedal to the bracket and the firewall. It's kinda sandwiched in there, so they didn't go to alot of expense putting it on the firewall. He will also want to assure that to have full swing, that it may need to be offset from the firewall. I used two 3/16 inch pieces of plate stacked on top of each other, with bolts and nuts running through the bracket, plates, and firewall, but the pedal does now have sufficient swing for the throttle body, and does not bottom out on the firewall or floor beforehand.
    Anyway, on to cable assembly. I made a mark directly in front of the attachment point for the cable on the firewall. A marker, crayon. drill bit, anything to make a hole will suffice. After that, I sized up the drill bit with the plastic attachment on the cable(where it goes through the firewall, drilled the hole, and attached the cable to the firewall. The through the firewall attachment has two plastic clips on it which let it anchor to the firewall. If you get it right, is should snap in and stay there. If you get it wrong, like I did, you'll need to make up a plate that fits over the oversized hole you just drilled, and either screw or weld it in. I had to make up an aluminum block off plate and ream out a proper sized hole for the attachment and attach it with some sheetmetal screws, because I went too big with the Unibit. Anyway, from here, I fashioned some bracketry that hung off the back of the throttle body, to attach the bracket with the cable that came from the Blazer, mounted the bracket, and then attached the other end of the cable to the throttle body.
    The brackets that hang from the back of the throttle body are adjustable, meaning there are some All Thread rods and nuts back there, that let me move the brackets up and down, as well as move the cable bracket up and down. This is important, because if the alignment is correct, it will fail to completely open, or bind up and fail to completely close(you thought Toyota's Prius problems were bad!), so some finagling is in order. Once everything was lined up properly, the '55's manners on throttle sensitivity improved immensely!

    I also went ahead with a suspended pedal, because the throttle body came from a cable actuated car. I used a hybrid, floor mounted pedal/cable assembly beforehand. It did the job, but as the mechanics had it pushing down, twisting the rod, and yanking back on the cable to go, it was an "always on always off" sort of affair and made my foot nervous when I wanted to give it gas to push in the clutch. I wanted more control, so I switched to this type of arrangement instead.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  20. #420
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    My 53 lacks any pedal at the moment and I don't think my original pedal is salvageable or even complete. He is pulling the motor and trans out of this car for his blazer but wants almost nothing else off of the truck. So I could pretty have the suspended pedal setup. Just so were clear this would be going into my studebaker with a stude V8 and a carburetor with your info the install looks like it cold be pretty slick, but the key difference between our cars would be that mine has a Carb and yours FI. I was wondering if it would be more trouble than it's worth to attach this cable to a normal stude carb?
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  21. #421
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I'd say take whatever is left over with the pedal even if you don't use it. I'm the kind of guy who will take that stuff, in the event that I'll need it in the future. You'll need to remove it from the firewall, and you'll need to be super careful with the clips on the firewall(it's one of those deals where you squeeze both sides in, and push it through the hole).

    My suspended pedal was almost application specific, in that I wanted something with a little more control than the stock pedal that I was using. If you're using a stock Studebaker carb, I'd almost be tempted to use the stock mechanical linkage that hung from the back of the engine, unless you can find a way to make it work with the Studebaker carb. I had one in the Lark and 2r5 without issue, as they were still factory carbureted engines. If there's some semblance of a hole where the throttle boot used to be, and a place to drill two holes in the floor, and unlike my other Daytona project, is not rusted through in the toeboards, for simplicity's sake I'd use the stock mechanical linkage in this regard. If you really wanna a challenge though, want to remove the linkage on the back of the engine, and in general, clean up the area around the firewall, you can use a cable linkage. However, like I said, you will need to find a way to hook it up to the Studebaker carburetor, and align the cable linkage so it doesn't bind. But, you will have a modern pedal in the car.

    I also forgot....return springs. I used stiffer dual coil return springs from an '85 Oldsmobile. I hooked those up to the throttle body, which solved the closing issues, as the geometry allows them the throttle to properly close.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  22. #422
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    What actually sparked the idea was talking about using the brake pedal/booster out of this truck. Thanks for the advice. We'll see how custom I go in these departments.
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  23. #423
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    When I pulled everything out of the Plymouth I also saved the cable between the pedal & carb but it was so long that I went for the old linkage instead, easy enough to weld the rods together on the top & it worx.

    My original pedal was screwed on a door-hinge in a strange angle & really rusted -beginning to bend- so I made a pedal out of aluminum & got a more racing-looking one, but it's not totally finished yet, gotta do a ring/holder on the back for the push-rod first since the drilled hole is to shallow.

  24. #424
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    ...So I guess the best is to check how long cable you need, it's quite irritating when it's just that little to long & bends in bad ways.

  25. #425
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    Obviously your not afraid to do anything with welder. So just curious, have you considered making some tube style headers for this baby?
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  26. #426
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I've had it in the back of my head to do some turbo headers. I really should do up a pipe bender beforehand, of which I have some drawings for. I have a 300 dollar 110V 125 amp Clarke MIG welder, that I've had since 2007. It's not a fancy welder, but for thin metal application(well up to 3/16) it gets the job done, and the parts on it are practically universal. I should also add that I'm learning as I'm going, so the welds are functional, but they won't be pretty. I'd also chalk that up to the welder too. Anyway, like I said, I have ideas for turbo headers, which are like tube headers, except they possess a flange on the collector for the turbocharger. I'd need to get some more bulk exhaust pipe from the automotive supply company down here for that, which isn't a real big deal, and I'd have to cut down some wide bar stock that I can get at Menards on the opposite end of town. For now it's on the backburner though, because I'm working on a separate project involving the hood. I have a pair of cone filters that I bought about a year ago, but no place to put them, so I'm going to, ahem, make a slight adjustment to the height of the hood. I'll get more into that later when I get into that little project.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  27. #427
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    Thinking of adjusting the hood's hight... where I grew up a guy had that problem on his street-racing -62 Valiant & he cut the hood almost the whole length on both sides about2 inches from the outer edges (as I remember) & welded in curved strips that were higher/wider at the middle.
    At first it just looked odd but then when you reallyreally looked at it it actually looked cool & loads of people (including me) said "I'm gonna do that too!" but still to this day I can't remember anyone doing it.
    It's just that now when I'm thinking of it I might just do that... if needed.

  28. #428
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    I wonder if you could go to the parts yards and scavage some turbo headers off of two four cylinder car. Take them and chop and weld till they line up with the studebaker flange.
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  29. #429
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I'll try and keep yall posted on the hood. I will say that when I solve a problem like this on the car, I really go big with making it lot better than it was before, just look at the bumpers!

    With the turbo flanges, the ports on these heads are siamesed in the center. Many modern headers have separated ports, and I wouldn't be sure if the pipes would line up with the ports. I really like starting off from scratch on assembling the pipes, than try to make something fit, so it's easier just to cut a pair of flanges, and make up some pipes, than to try and force something incompatible together. It sounds out of sorts with what I've been doing with the rest of the engine, but much like the intake manifold, we're dealing with something that is a pretty Studebaker specific component, so it may call for something fairly custom.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  30. #430
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    I used to make headers in the late 70's & there's a lot to it, you ought to have the firing-order in mind to make the pipes come together so the explosions help pushing each other out... otherwise you might end up with pulses that choke each other.
    So there's some drawing & such to do... but it sure is worth it!
    First time I put my own on my -62 Valiant 225 slant six it was "WOW, I FEEL IT!!!" not like "yeah, I sure think I feel it..." & there wasn't anything else done to that engine.
    Well, to say I used to make them is a over-statement since I couldn't weld at the time but I had this guy doing the actual welding for me & I sat by his side & held the pipes where I wanted them to fit.

  31. #431
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Yep, depending on what you're looking for, there's also formulas to help you determine how big and how long the pipes need to be. Whenever I get to them, this will probably just be used for eye candy, as I don't have intentions of making all sorts of different sets of headers to run on the dragstrip. I have some calculations in my notebook here from way back on how long the pipes should be. The turbo headers also have a similar set of guidelines as the regular headers do, except the end result is where, when, and how efficiently do you want the turbo to start to spool. I will say that what I have on their now does do the job, but it's more like an exhaust pipe adapter. The flange comes off of the stock exhaust manifold, makes a U shape, comes up into the engine compartment, and joins with the turbo. It works, but it's not exactly pretty. What it really needs is something that goes directly to the exhaust pipe, and all four ports need to join at the turbo flange instead.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  32. #432
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    Why not copy some headers, Hooker's for example, they must've made some for Studebaker engines... then you just ad what you want to it!

  33. #433
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Why not copy some headers, Hooker's for example, they must've made some for Studebaker engines... then you just ad what you want to it!


    Yeah, I could do that, but that'd suck some of the fun out of this sorta thing!
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  34. #434
    President Member Nox's Avatar
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    Well then you just kinda look in to it... in a way... & then when you've got the idea you make your own version & it'll be your style anyway!
    After all, the real FUN is when it worx GOOD!!!

    & maby ther's some folx on Sonny's racing site who...?
    Last edited by Nox; 09-20-2013 at 05:11 PM.

  35. #435
    President Member GThawkwind's Avatar
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    Yeah does anybody make headers for a stude??
    1953 Starlight Coupe ( project)

    I don't know I haven't thought of anything catchy yet , hey look a twinkie

  36. #436
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Yes, R3 headers have been around for a long, long time. Dave Thibeault, Jon Myers, Phil Harris, etc, would sell those. If you want to make up some of your own, they also sell the header flange blanks, which are just the flanges with the square ports. The blanks are what I would be using, as there are no turbo headers available for a Stude V8.
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  37. #437
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Well, I said I'd make mention of a hood project for later, I guess this would be later!
    For the past few weeks, I've been building up a supply of fiberglass cloth(we're up to about 3 layers for the edges, 5-6 for the nose) to try my hand at building a mold of the hood. The objective revolves around dissipating heat, and providing fresh air to a pair of my Spectre cone filters that would be attached to the inlets of the turbos. Well, this is what I had in mind:



    The objective is not so much to save on weight, but like the fuel injection and the turbos, to create a custom piece for the car. It'd also bring in fresh air through the NACA ducts in the front of the hood, and vent the heat from the cowl induction. That part of the project would also finish the air pickup, since I'm running around without the filters at the moment. In this application though, the cowl induction would have a secondary role, since there isn't a large round paper filter under that cowl, and the vehicle is not carbureted. The scoop back there would be a way to vent the heat out when it got hot, and the air was still(say like if I was stuck in traffic). This situation is one that I know all too well with the Lark, stuck in traffic in 90 degree weather with all that heat, and no place to go! The Lark wasn't all that bad once I put in the big fan, shroud, and recored the radiator, but good Lord did it still like to get warm! I know a few of you have hoods like this for sale, but I'd like to try my hand at working with fiberglass. This was a bucket list item of mine, right under carbon fiber. I may also need these skills for whatever the day comes when I need to redo the finish on my fiberglass fenders for the Lark, so it could be defined as a win-win.

    So far, I've amassed a stockpile of cloth, a little leftover resin, some hardener, and some Great Stuff expanding foam for the structural ribs underneath. I'm still short on resin, brushes, tinfoil, and maybe a jar of Vaseline to spread over the "plug". As far as progress after that, I'll keep y'all posted ........
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  38. #438
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    I pulled my Ebay ANL fuse and its holder out of the car today. For the past couple days, I was having trouble getting the car to roll over, even with a rebrushed and replaced starter. The car was having starter issues, and kept blowing its 300 amp fuse, so on a whim, I took the battery cable and wired it directly to the battery as it was wired in the Studebaker shop manuals. I started the car, and not more than a 1/4 of a turn, and away it would go where before it would just crank and crank and crank, and eventually would blow the fuse. I figured the holder is behaving like a resistor, and its not providing the required amperage to the starter. The subsequent cranking would heat up every one of my connections, and since these systems are only as strong as the weakest link, the fuse would sense something was amiss when it was not, and it'd blow. While taking it out, one of the thin aluminum terminals that connects to the battery cable literally broke off of the housing on the fuse holder, so that further substantiated that this might have been a problem area ever since it went in the car.

    In short, it more than likely takes more than 300 amps to turn these 6V starters over, and if you buy one of these to use in the starting system(this was made for a high end stereo), it needs to be stoutly constructed!
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  39. #439
    President Member PlainBrownR2's Avatar
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    Chuffing along before it became too cold, I installed my cone filters on the '55. I had bought these things two Christmases ago, so it was about time that they ended up on the car. There were two of them that were needed, because there are two turbos, which meant two inlets to put something in front of them(makes sense right?) . Anyway, after finding some places on the engine, I first fashioned a sort of shelf or box to hold the air filter. The bracket was also an adapter to a smaller hose behind it, which fed into the inlet on the turbo. The first one looked good, but needed to be cut down a bit, so I can get to the spark plugs with a wrench.....







    After I got rightie in, it was now leftie's turn. I built its bracket in the same fashion, and installed it to the rail that attaches my coil packs. Space was tight for the hoses for both, but I managed to get them on......





    You'll notice that the symmetry is off on the air filters. There was some compromise needed here, because a very important alternator is occupying the same space that the air filter should be in, so this was the next best solution....



    How does it run? Well, quite well. I thought the heat from the pipes would have problems with the inlet hose, but after a spin in the yard, it doesn't bother it, so it's probably pretty good.

    After repairing my driver's side horn, on to bigger and better things!!
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  40. #440
    President Member Corley's Avatar
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    Are you having fun yet? Seems to me you are having more fun than a barrel of monkeys with that Studie!! Good on you!!
    Corley

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