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Thread: Don't let the old man in, courtesy of Clint

  1. #1
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    Don't let the old man in, courtesy of Clint

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yc5AWImplfE

    The song was written by Toby Keith after spending some time with 88-year-old actor-director-filmmaker, Clint Eastwood. Keith asked Eastwood, “what keeps you going?” and he said, “I get up every day and don't let the old man in.” The rest is history. Keith wrote a song for him called 'Don't Let the Old Man In.’ The song, released today and will be in the new Eastwood movie ‘The Mule,’ which will be released this year on December 14.



    The song was written by Toby Keith after spending some time with 88-year-old actor-director-filmmaker, Clint Eastwood. Keith asked Eastwood, “what keeps you going?” and he said, “I get up every day and don't let the old man in.” The rest is history. Keith wrote a song for him called 'Don't Let the Old Man In.’ The song, released today and will be in the new Eastwood movie ‘The Mule,’ which will be released this year on December 14.

  2. #2
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    Great lyric's in that song...
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


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    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for this, Bill.

    You have no idea how every visual of Clint Eastwood in that video looks just like my late Uncle Milton Palma, my Dad's younger brother from whom I learned so much about cars....and life! I really miss Uncle Milt; although he died 25 years ago this coming December, it seems like only yesterday I could drive 80-odd miles to the old folks' home where he was living, take him to lunch, and enjoy his seasoned wit and wisdom. (And Milt would be driving a Ford product, too, just as was Clint in the video!)

    Thanks again many times over. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Thanks for the post, Bill! It's a great reminder of how thankful we should be for each day. It has now been four weeks since we buried my mom (98). She had a wonderful life, and there were so many offspring and family, that we had to move the funeral service to the largest church in town just to have enough space for the family and relatives. I was the youngest son, (middle born), but at age 74, I am the oldest living male in the family. None of the others made it to 70(67).



    Living with agent orange diabetes, sleep apnea, and the secondary related issues pose a daily challenge of keeping the old man at bay. But we soldier on. Even though we refuse to merely open the door for the "old man," we know that life circumstances are always lurking to kick in the door! While I have a TV remote and a recliner, so far, I refuse to turn myself over to the comfort of the couch. I believe many of us relate to the struggle.



    This video/song is a timely inspirational reminder of how fortunate we are and how grateful we should be for not just our shelter and food...but a good mate, medicine, and our next breath...even if it is enhanced by a CPAP machine as we sleep.



    Something kind about nature is that in our youth, we may have a passing thought about our future, but it is our elders that provide the path.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    We should repay them by paying attention, showing respect, and offering gratitude. Someday, if you live long enough, you won't have to "let the old man in"...he will just appear in your mirror.

    The picture below was taken half a century after the picture above...
    [IMG][/IMG] That's me at age 73...

    It was taken by my riding buddy...age 84!
    [IMG][/IMG]
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

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    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
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    A few days ago I had a ride with my new ship neighbour (he also has a tug, a wee bitt bigger than mine but the same style) from Groningen to A'dam (Holland) & he's old enough to be shaky, you know; his hands & neck shakes a bit, but when he bords my or his own ship he jumps! & no, he aint fat but anyway! & both our ships has the wheelhouse on top of the deckhouse & steep ladders & he climbs them without effort.
    But his car, a high ugly swollen & black-ofcourse BaaderMeinhofWagen without any suspension what so ever - he drives the way I would expect, QUICK(!) movements between lines & he can't hold the gas steady...
    But luckely the car has cruise control & it was a lot of highway driving.
    & that old man JUMPS the railings on tugboats!
    A man of action I'd say...


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    John,
    Thank You for posting such poignant pics from both your past and your present day adventures. You too are an inspiration to us all. Ride on.
    Bill

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    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    Great pictures, John, and thank you for your service. And, thank you for being a great Studebaker friend!

    On the subject, I cannot understand so many people today. I am 57 years old and most all of my friends are either looking for or have already taken the exit ramp to retirement. My brother is three years younger than me and when he isn’t working he wants to sit in his camper trailer at the local RV park and look at the lake. Not for me! I just bought the property where I will be building not only my new shop, but I have plans for several other businesses on that 32 acres.

    Linda asked me, why would you want to take on a whole new undertaking at this stage of your life? I told her, I see my life differently than most people my age. God willing I want to work at least another 20 years!

    Let the old man in? He can go screw. I’m too busy.

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    I just bought the property where I will be building not only my new shop, but I have plans for several other businesses on that 32 acres.
    Another 'new shop'!!?! Didn't you just build one four or five years ago?

    Business must be good.

    Craig

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    Retired ain't dead. I've been retired for 20 years and in that time I've taken care of a aging father that didn't want to go to a nursing home, been involved with the growth of four grandchildren that I interacted with on a routine basis and built three Studebakers in my polebarn. I buried two great bil's recently but had the time to interact with them over those years and enjoyed much more than we would have if we were still working.

    I've gotten much better at golf, had time to spend in Florida with Judy (wife) and also help my son when he had a couple of back surgeries.

    I could go on but just for the record, I didn't retire I just changed activities. Now at 76 I've had a great career in industry, helped my grand kids grow up and been able to do many things I would never had time for otherwise.

    Bob
    , ,

  10. #10
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzard View Post
    John,
    Thank You for posting such poignant pics from both your past and your present day adventures. You too are an inspiration to us all. Ride on.
    Bill
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    ...And, thank you for being a great Studebaker friend!...
    A slight correction...admission...confession regarding “the old man.” I have this small outbuilding that I cobbled together about twenty years ago. Back then, I had sold a painting robot to one of my injection molding customers that was making components for our growing southern auto/truck mfg industry. Instead of tossing the shipping crates into a dumpster, I gathered it up and brought it home. (I call it opportunistic predatory dumpster-diving.)



    I had horses and needed a “feed-room.” So I re-purposed the material into a 8X8 foot building. Plywood sides, floor, and OSB roof sheeting. In addition, I used salvaged windows from an old pickup camper top. I topped it off with some weird red corrugated asphalt roofing panels I bought from Lowe’s. (‘cause they were cheap!) It seems like it only took me a couple of days to throw this thing together.


    So...fast forward a couple of decades... Two months ago, I waddled out to the little shed to get some cat food to feed my barn cats. (horses are long gone) That’s when I noticed the roof leak. A harbor freight tarp became the temporary fix. Now...the reason for this post...”Trying to fight off the Old Man!”



    I started the real repair on Monday. Repairing the roof. Two decades after building it. Removing that old roofing material. Cutting some leftover metal roofing (from another project) to length. Repairing the old water damaged underlayment, etc., etc. Climbing ladders, scaffolding, wielding crowbars, hammers, saws, and other assorted tools don’t come as easy as it did a couple of decades ago. I’ve spent three days on it and I might be halfway done. I’m sore all over! Sometimes...having fun with tools hurts. The sun is shining, I need to get to it...so...as I hobble away, excuse my absence from this forum ‘cause I have work to do ...
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclary View Post
    Thanks for the post, Bill! It's a great reminder of how thankful we should be for each day. It has now been four weeks since we buried my mom (98).
    John,

    Sorry to hear about the passing of your mom. I apologize for not offering my condolences earlier, but this post is the first time I read that she passed.



    Something kind about nature is that in our youth, we may have a passing thought about our future, but it is our elders that provide the path.
    When I was (much) younger, I liked it when 'the old man let ME in', as you learned so much from them!

    We should repay them by paying attention, showing respect, and offering gratitude. Someday, if you live long enough, you won't have to "let the old man in"...he will just appear in your mirror.
    As has been said before, when an 'old man' dies, you lose a set of encyclopedia's worth of knowledge!!! Just be thankful some of our ex-Studebaker executives put their memoirs to print in Turning Wheels and other publications for our benefit!

    Craig

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    It's worth noting that Clint Eastwood is still working, despite his age -- presumably because he wants to. I worked until I was 77, though I converted to part time when I was 70. Can't say I enjoyed every minute, but I felt I was doing something useful (national defense) and in that sense, it was rewarding. They would have kept me on, but my wife retired as soon as she was eligible and wanted to do more fun things. Aside from some vacations-not-taken, the principal losers have been my cars, which I have repeatedly put off restoring. Am finally finishing the restoration of my 54 Stude pickup, which I've owned for 45 years.

    The one thing that brings out the "old man" in me is ladders. My father fell off one when he was around 67 and never really regained his vitality. I fell off one about 10 years ago with a running chainsaw in my hand (more accurately, the ladder fell down with me on it), but suffered nothing more than some bruises. Yesterday I slipped on an icy patch while both my hands were carrying something heavy (my own fault -- I hadn't done a very good job shoveling the snow) but suffered no ill effects. The thing that none of us can control is the random illness or natural disaster. All we can do is keep on truckin'.

  13. #13
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    It's worth noting that Clint Eastwood is still working, despite his age -- presumably because he wants to. I worked until I was 77, though I converted to part time when I was 70. Can't say I enjoyed every minute, but I felt I was doing something useful (national defense) and in that sense, it was rewarding. They would have kept me on, but my wife retired as soon as she was eligible and wanted to do more fun things. Aside from some vacations-not-taken, the principal losers have been my cars, which I have repeatedly put off restoring. Am finally finishing the restoration of my 54 Stude pickup, which I've owned for 45 years.

    The one thing that brings out the "old man" in me is ladders. My father fell off one when he was around 67 and never really regained his vitality. I fell off one about 10 years ago with a running chainsaw in my hand (more accurately, the ladder fell down with me on it), but suffered nothing more than some bruises. Yesterday I slipped on an icy patch while both my hands were carrying something heavy (my own fault -- I hadn't done a very good job shoveling the snow) but suffered no ill effects. The thing that none of us can control is the random illness or natural disaster. All we can do is keep on truckin'.
    Hey Skip...I'm with you about ladders. If you recall, not long ago, our fellow member rbruner (Charleston, SC) had a terrible accident from a ladder fall.

    As a follow up from my post #10, yesterday I managed to complete most of the roof on my little outdoor shed. I say most because I still have some minor facia trim work remaining, but have the panels in place and a ridge cap (crudely fashioned from a salvaged length of an inverted gutter). For this little project, I employed three ladders and two sections of scaffolding. While all, (properly used), are tools that contribute to safety, the older we get the more deliberate and cautious we need to be. During my project, I had to break down my stacked 16-foot high scaffold by myself. There were a couple of critical awkward moments during that process that could have been catastrophic but I managed to complete the task and reconstruct them into two separate 8-foot tall scaffolds. Truth be told...I probably spent more time gathering tools, positioning scaffolding and ladders, cleaning up and putting tools away at the end of each day... than actually doing the work. It is also a patient cautious pace that we (sometimes) acquire with age.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

  14. #14
    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie View Post

    The one thing that brings out the "old man" in me is ladders. My father fell off one when he was around 67 and never really regained his vitality. I fell off one about 10 years ago with a running chainsaw in my hand (more accurately, the ladder fell down with me on it), but suffered nothing more than some bruises. Yesterday I slipped on an icy patch while both my hands were carrying something heavy (my own fault -- I hadn't done a very good job shoveling the snow) but suffered no ill effects. The thing that none of us can control is the random illness or natural disaster. All we can do is keep on truckin'.
    I hear that, Skip. 'Wife has been bugging me to quit climbing up and cleaning the gutters every spring and fall.

    My roommate at Purdue, with whom I'm still good friends 50 years later, fell off his ladder cleaning his gutters a couple years ago and broke his hip. Nobody was home, so he laid immobilized to reduce the pain for an hour or so until his wife returned.

    I hated to spend the money, but last year's major home improvement was just shy of $5,000 for the LeafGuard gutter system. 'Gotta admit, it was worth it. Like you, I was feeling increasingly uneasy about climbing up there every year.

    Thanks for the affirmation. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Another 'new shop'!!?! Didn't you just build one four or five years ago?

    Business must be good.

    Craig
    Glad to see you’re excited for me! Hopefully you will find some use for what’s left of your life too. It would help you feel better about yourself- and thereby, others.

  16. #16
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    I try to stay away from ladders now. The most that I do is go up to a ceiling light fixture. I replace the burnt out bulbs with LEDs. They should last longer than I.
    Two friends, younger than I was at the time, died about the same time as a result of injuries of falling from a ladder. Both of these were in their homes when they fell. One was an ex-SDC President.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    Great pictures, John, and thank you for your service. And, thank you for being a great Studebaker friend!

    On the subject, I cannot understand so many people today. I am 57 years old and most all of my friends are either looking for or have already taken the exit ramp to retirement. My brother is three years younger than me and when he isn’t working he wants to sit in his camper trailer at the local RV park and look at the lake. Not for me! I just bought the property where I will be building not only my new shop, but I have plans for several other businesses on that 32 acres.

    Linda asked me, why would you want to take on a whole new undertaking at this stage of your life? I told her, I see my life differently than most people my age. God willing I want to work at least another 20 years!

    Let the old man in? He can go screw. I’m too busy.
    It would be nice if you resided a couple of hundred miles closer to me. When I was your age, I was working a 50 hour week at my regular job plus doing other things. About the time that you were born, I was running a service station seven days a week. My father used to say that those that just sit around in retirement usually die within a few years. He kept very active and lived to be 103. EDIT: My father's two brothers and two sisters all died in their 50s-60s.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  18. #18
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    These are my riding buddies, Neil and Buddy. Neil is the president of the CJMC and Buddy is 76 years old and we rode Titus Canyon. Me on my 1983 Suzuki Tempter, Neil on a CL350 and Buddy on a 2005 Concours! We had macho off road riders come down the same trails and ask where we came from. Neil pointed and said, "The same way you guys did, it's one way!" The guy then says, "On those street bikes?" and rode off shaking they're heads.








    Buddy doesn't let the old man in, constantly active and always working on something or riding somewhere.
    Last edited by Topper2011; 03-10-2019 at 12:49 PM.

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    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Apparently, this topic has touched many of us here on the forum. And well it should, because it speaks to where we've been in this life's journey, where we are, and where we are going. I wanted to post some pictures of my latest challenge I have been discussing in my previous posts but had to search hard for a pic of the little shed. (It was never anything to be proud of enough to take a purposeful picture.) Finally, I found one where it is in the background. I took it this past summer when the subject of the picture was my Studebaker truck after I had returned from the feed store. So the first picture below will have the little shed in the background.

    Next, is the old weathered deteriorated fiber/asphalt impregnated roofing I had to remove. The last pic shows the new metal roof along with the scaffolding and a bunch of other clutter. One is my outdoor incinerator built from an old water heater tank, a salvage lawn tractor, and various other (ahem) treasures. It is very obvious that I could never live in a place where I had to adhere to the rules of any homeowner's association.

    Hopefully, this coming week I will recover enough from my shoulder & back pain to clean up this mess and move on to another project. Future plans will involve some long overdue painting.

    [IMG][/IMG] [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    John Clary
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  20. #20
    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    It would be nice if you resided a couple of hundred miles closer to me. When I was your age, I was working a 50 hour week at my regular job plus doing other things. About the time that you were born, I was running a service station seven days a week. My father used to say that those that just sit around in retirement usually die within a few years. He kept very active and lived to be 103. EDIT: My father's two brothers and two sisters all died in their 50s-60s.
    Gary, I have often thought the same thing. There is always a need for forward thinking, intelligent people, no matter their age. I would love to have somebody around like you to guide me.

    Currently I am still working at the post office delivering mail, just hit 30 years in January. In 2 years I will max out my pension and retire then. That whole time, I have stayed in business. We have been in business since my father started fresh out of the Marine Corps in 1952, always auto repair and sales. We have a good operation and I have a great team, lots of younger guys much more educated than I. Our shops have been doing well, but I just bought the land to build a top-of-the-line, state-of-the-art facility where we can do more collector car stuff. Currently there is a big market for tuning and accessorizing modern muscle cars.

    Another area where we have been steadily growing is modernizing older cars – electronica ignition‘s, disc brakes, steering and suspension upgrades, and fuel injection. We also do a lot of air-conditioning add-ons. People still love their older cars as artwork, but they want them to be nicer to drive.

    We are currently starting to look at training and equipment for hybrids, and full electrics. No question that those are the way of the future, and we want to be a go to place for that type of thing.

    I think that ultimately the future is modernizing and cutting edge technology. Most of the general population has a growing hatred for automobiles, particularly older ones. Most people want them off the roads and relegated to museums are crushed. I think there will be an ongoing future for making the cars more livable in today’s world. Regardless, I have a lot of years left to work that I am looking forward to, and I look forward to adjusting to what the future brings within my God-given calling, which is the automotive world.

    Maybe once the new shop is up and running, we should try to organize a Studebaker meet there :-)

  21. #21
    Golden Hawk Member
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    "Maybe once the new shop is up and running, we should try to organize a Studebaker meet there :-) "

    Bob A.- The SDC Northeast Zone Meet is in Syracuse this year (August 15-17). That is reasonably close to you.


    Thank you for the kind words. Believe me, I was not soliciting them.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  22. #22
    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    I know you weren’t, but I always had respect for you.

    As for the zone meet, it will depend on what’s happening with the project. The goal is to have the new shop done before winter, depending on how quick I can make the financing package happen. I have already crossed off Spring Carlisle, first time in many years. But it’s going to take all I e got to make it work. Pete Bishop and Steve Miller have already pitched me on the Meet though, it would be great to go.

  23. #23
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    Most of the general population has a growing hatred for automobiles, particularly older ones. Most people want them off the roads and relegated to museums are crushed.
    If true, it doesn't bode well for those in the auto biz...especially the older auto biz.

    Fortunately, I find the opposite to be the case.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    I think there will be an ongoing future for making the cars more livable in today’s world.
    So true. There always has been a good business in upgrading and modernizing cars...ever since there were cars. A great choice.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    Gary, I have often thought the same thing. There is always a need for forward thinking, intelligent people, no matter their age. I would love to have somebody around like you to guide me.

    Currently I am still working at the post office delivering mail, just hit 30 years in January. In 2 years I will max out my pension and retire then. That whole time, I have stayed in business. We have been in business since my father started fresh out of the Marine Corps in 1952, always auto repair and sales. We have a good operation and I have a great team, lots of younger guys much more educated than I. Our shops have been doing well, but I just bought the land to build a top-of-the-line, state-of-the-art facility where we can do more collector car stuff. Currently there is a big market for tuning and accessorizing modern muscle cars.

    Another area where we have been steadily growing is modernizing older cars – electronica ignition‘s, disc brakes, steering and suspension upgrades, and fuel injection. We also do a lot of air-conditioning add-ons. People still love their older cars as artwork, but they want them to be nicer to drive.

    We are currently starting to look at training and equipment for hybrids, and full electrics. No question that those are the way of the future, and we want to be a go to place for that type of thing.

    I think that ultimately the future is modernizing and cutting edge technology. Most of the general population has a growing hatred for automobiles, particularly older ones. Most people want them off the roads and relegated to museums are crushed. I think there will be an ongoing future for making the cars more livable in today’s world. Regardless, I have a lot of years left to work that I am looking forward to, and I look forward to adjusting to what the future brings within my God-given calling, which is the automotive world.

    Maybe once the new shop is up and running, we should try to organize a Studebaker meet there :-)
    Bob Andrews: Things must have been going very good for you the last five years. I can remember in late 2014 when you purchased that little two car garage that was built back in the 1920's that you said you were going to restore. Maybe you can show us all the some before and after pictures of the restoration you did to that garage. Glad to hear that your doing so well with your current business ventures. How many shops do you own and how many persons do you employ.

    John S.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Packard53 View Post
    Bob Andrews: Things must have been going very good for you the last five years. I can remember in late 2014 when you purchased that little two car garage that was built back in the 1920's that you said you were going to restore. Maybe you can show us all the some before and after pictures of the restoration you did to that garage. Glad to hear that your doing so well with your current business ventures. How many shops do you own and how many persons do you employ.

    John S.
    I too am curious to see the pics and stats, please.
    Evan Davis
    Prince Albert, Sk

  26. #26
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Packard53 View Post
    I can remember in late 2014 when you purchased that little two car garage that was built back in the 1920's that you said you were going to restore. Maybe you can show us all the some before and after pictures of the restoration you did to that garage.
    That is the 'new shop' in my above post that I was referring to in Post #49 here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...-a-click/page2 , plus reference to an addition to it in Post #14 here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...or-restoration .

    Craig

  27. #27
    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    LOL, the trolls are out. Where's Biggsy and Torker? They haven't gotten in yet. Come on guys, glad to help you try to feel better about yourselves!

    Yes, I'll get right on posting details here, where you all are so welcoming and supportive XD

    Thanks, guys, you really do the club proud.
    Proud NON-CASO

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    If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truthlet me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

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  28. #28
    President Member
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    Bob Andrews: I hope that you can gett the money to build your new state of the garage on that 32 acres of land you bought. I am sure that is going to require a sizeable investment of a couple of hundred thousand dollars. With the purchase of the land, new modern building and the latest state of computer equipment. You will have the honor of waking every morning do I get enough business today to make a profit while meeting expenses and being able to make monthly payments to your lenders and pay your employees. The biggest worry is that since your are working a full time job with the USPS does the person running the business for you are they honest or are they going to cook the books and rob you blind. The other real fact that you have to face is that if you take on that kind of debt at you age you will be in debt up to your neck for the next 10 to 15 years. You will never be able to afford to retire if you wanted to down the road.. At your age do you really think that you can take that kind of daily stress for the next 10 to 15 years. Your past track record at staying in business isn't the most stellar. Just some food for thought.

    John S.
    Last edited by Packard53; 03-13-2019 at 08:39 PM.

  29. #29
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    I hope it works out in your favor, and some excellent advice was also offered here as well to make one seriously think it over before going into debt and setting up a small business operation: https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/...#post-11486981


    Craig

  30. #30
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    It all depends on OPM....

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    It all depends on OPM....
    We agree! As recently as three years ago I had the greatest indebtedness of my lifetime. I am 85+ and thankful for the life I've had and appreciate each day and am currently debt free. Debt has never bothered me as long as I could support it. Every January I would total debt and assets and the net result tells me how I am doing. Interest is the rent on OPM. I recall in 1965 I was broke and asked the Standard Oil dealer to charge me $5 on my credit card and give me the money. He responded, "I'm not a bank!" Rightfully so. In my opinion debt is a tool and if properly managed can be very useful. My financial adventures are over!

    The video and song with Clint Eastwood and Toby Keith is excellent.
    Last edited by Bob Bryant; 03-14-2019 at 11:13 AM. Reason: add

  32. #32
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Bryant View Post
    In my opinion debt is a tool and if properly managed can be very useful.
    It can have its advantages if its a taxable write-off, and/or its a high-maintenance, expensive product that's continually 'improved' or updated each year. An office photocopier comes to mind, as most are rented or leased.

    Craig

  33. #33
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    FWIW - The world runs on OPM. Major corporations borrow to build mega buck facilities, small business use it for inventory or expansion, individuals use it to buy homes, send kids to college or buy/lease a car. It's the axis the world turns on, we borrow from China.

    Nothing wrong with using OPM if it's done responsibly.

    Bob
    , ,

  34. #34
    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
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    China... Here in Europe just about everything is made in China, & if you have a kid & go in to a toystore EVERYTHING actually IS! & all they buy from us is scrap iron to make more shortlived crap for us to buy = cash goes one way...
    I remember in the late 70's a here in north Europe well known Finnish man (that I just don't remember the name of now!) said: "As long as we keep on buying japanese cars, the sooner we won't afford to buy any cars at all!".
    & that was then but it doesn't matter; people refuse to listen to reason...


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  35. #35
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noxnabaker View Post
    China... Here in Europe just about everything is made in China, & if you have a kid & go in to a toystore EVERYTHING actually IS!
    Toys being made in China is nothing new. Hot Wheels cars have been Made in Hong Kong since they were first issued in 1967.

    Craig

  36. #36
    Silver Hawk Member Studedude's Avatar
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    Tick-tock, tick-tock

    Dave Lester

  37. #37
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    Bob Andrews: After reading through some links and threads that Craig (8E4SE) posted and doing some other research there is only conclusion to come to. Your claim of purchasing 32 acers of land and wanting to build a state of the art automotive repair garage and other businesses on the 32 acers has little or mostly no merit. It saddens me deeply to say that. However I do wish you the best of luck.

    John S
    Last edited by Packard53; 03-14-2019 at 07:26 PM.

  38. #38
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclary View Post
    Apparently, this topic has touched many of us here on the forum. And well it should, because it speaks to where we've been in this life's journey, where we are, and where we are going. I wanted to post some pictures of my latest challenge I have been discussing in my previous posts but had to search hard for a pic of the little shed. (It was never anything to be proud of enough to take a purposeful picture.) Finally, I found one where it is in the background. I took it this past summer when the subject of the picture was my Studebaker truck after I had returned from the feed store. So the first picture below will have the little shed in the background.

    Next, is the old weathered deteriorated fiber/asphalt impregnated roofing I had to remove. The last pic shows the new metal roof along with the scaffolding and a bunch of other clutter. One is my outdoor incinerator built from an old water heater tank, a salvage lawn tractor, and various other (ahem) treasures. It is very obvious that I could never live in a place where I had to adhere to the rules of any homeowner's association.

    Hopefully, this coming week I will recover enough from my shoulder & back pain to clean up this mess and move on to another project. Future plans will involve some long overdue painting.

    [IMG][/IMG] [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    I like your pedal car! Did it come as a pickup or did you make it into one? I have one same brand (looks like) as a fire engine with two little wooden ladders.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  39. #39
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
    I like your pedal car! Did it come as a pickup or did you make it into one? I have one same brand (looks like) as a fire engine with two little wooden ladders.
    Here's the story on my "Pedal Truck"...

    I was at the landfill one day with some trash when a lady pulls in with a pick-up full of trash. In the heap, was a little red/rusty peddle car. The poor thing was full of bullet holes and what looked like hammer blows from a sledgehammer. She looked like she thought I was crazy when I asked her if I could have it but gladly gave it to me. I took it home and hung it in my barn for a few years. One day, I got inspired and began to hammer out the dents, sanding the rust, etc. It was a project that grew in scope and direction as I worked.

    Originally, I thought of merely restoring the peddle car, but began speculating if I could build it into a caricature of my truck? I cut off the front and the back. I made a heavy plywood template and used a ball pein hammer to form the sheet-metal grille. For the back, I fabricated a "dual-wall" pick-up bed, complete with working tailgate, as an almost exact copy of the Studebaker truck bed. Once I had the bed fabricated, I welded it in place and used a bit of body filler to smooth over my lousy welding.

    Amazingly, I found an old paint can from 1978 that held leftover paint from when I repainted the truck years ago. Pried open the old rusty lid to discover that the paint was still good. It is painted with the same paint on the real vehicle.
    Funny thing about the little peddle truck...folks keep coming up and telling me that they had one exactly like it when they were a kid! When that happens, I usually smile and tell them it's a shame theirs is not still around.

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG] OH...about the small license plate...Luke is my grandson's name. He got to play with the truck for the couple of weeks (seems like) he was small enough to fit in it. He has now graduated from high school and is contemplating his future.

    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

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