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Thread: Has anyone out there installed an electric fuel pump to correct long cranking times.

  1. #1
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    Has anyone out there installed an electric fuel pump to correct long cranking times.

    I am thinking about installing an electric fuel pump to help correct my long cranking time after the car has set for a few days. I am aware that this is a typical problem on older cars due to the evaporation of todays fuel and the fact that they have open vented fuel systems. I have a 63 Lark Daytona, 289 4 barrel. If you have done this I would like to know what electric fuel pump you used and how did it work out. Thank you and have a nice day. Bob.

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    Sorry guys, I am new at this. I see that someone else has a post regarding electric fuel pumps. I will do a better job regarding posting an item the next time. Bob

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    keep in mind that most (almost the most) engine wear is at start ups. by cranking with a good starter, you do pump oil up into those dry areas that prolonged sitting has created.....

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    Starting fluid is your friend. All it takes is just a couple of squirts into the carb, crank it and, you're G2G. It saves my starter and my 289 fires right up. Keep your hood open, make sure you have a fire extinguisher nearby, but if you don't overdo it, you're all set.
    "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
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    Yes; I've had one for years on my Lark and Jeep and would never go back to a mechanical one. Getting a good one is the problem. I've had several name brands on the Lark and failed me. When I bought my M38A1 back in the mid nineties it had a cheapo foreign one and has never let me down.

    Gene

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    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    I've got a Toyota electric pump as an auxillery just for priming on three of my cars. It's just in line with the stock mechanical pump, and works great. The Toyota pumps were $8 on Ebay.
    IMG_0728.jpgIMG_0729.jpgThis is my Hawk, the pump is mounted to the outside of the frame rail just ahead of the rear spring.

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    I got mine at Pep Boys. About $50 bucks. Been working for 9 years now no problem.

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    I don't use an electric pump on my cars, but I have installed them on several cars that had long crank times after sitting for a while. I do recommend installing a Ford rollover or collision switch in the hot wire to the pump in case there is a collision. The shock from the collision will turn off the pump reducing the chance of fire after the accident due to the fuel pump continuing to run after the accident. Bud

  9. #9
    Commander Member LarkingAround's Avatar
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    I installed a Hardy fuel pump on my 63 Daytona. Works a treat
    I refuse to eat anything labelled reformed ham. I can't stand the thought of a pig being slaughtered just as it got its life back on track.

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    thanks everyone

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    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dleroux View Post
    Starting fluid is your friend. All it takes is just a couple of squirts into the carb, crank it and, you're G2G. It saves my starter and my 289 fires right up. Keep your hood open, make sure you have a fire extinguisher nearby, but if you don't overdo it, you're all set.
    I have heard that startling fluid is a good source of blown head gaskets because it is so explosive. If I have to resort to something like that, I use WD-40. There is always a can of that around.

    BTW, I put electric fuel pumps on all my 12 volt cars. They help relieve vapor lock in the hot California climate, particularly at altitude. They are mounted like Bensherb's pictures.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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  12. #12
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    I put electric pumps on every car I buy. I can't stand the new fuel which evaporates in 3 minutes. Nor do I like the heat we get here sometimes in the Summer. 105+ temps REALLY don't like mechanical pumps.
    sals54

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    Two different solutions to empty carb problem:

    My newly purchased 6 cyl '63 Champ has many "improvements" installed by previous owner. The original mechanical fuel pump was removed and an electrical one installed. It was mounted on right inner fender near carb. Truck starts instantly but constant click, click, click noise is very annoying. When I get around to it I'm going to remove it and install the proper stock pump.

    My other Champ is a 289 with AFB carb. I used to remove air cleaner and pour some gas into carb. Effective but messy and crude. Then I realized since problem is empty fuel bowl why not just fill fuel bowl. I got a small squeeze bottle and fill fuel bowl through the vent tubes. Problem solved but I still need to remove and replace air cleaner. Next time I need gas I'm going to try non-ethanol marine fuel. Hopefully octane is sufficient and there will be no pre ignition.

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    President Member Rerun's Avatar
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    I would strongly suggest that anyone installing an electric pump would abandon the mechanical pump entirely and run the fuel line directly to the carburetor. The mechanical pump is firmly bolted to the block, and gets quite hot. This can cause vapor lock problems in the pump itself at idle, or in the carb, since the pump serves to "pre-heat" the fuel. The electric pump delivers much cooler fuel, and reduces the chance of vapor lock. I would also recommend installing the electric pump with an oil pressure switch to shut it down in the case of a crash or engine failure. A momentary (push button) switch can be used to run the pump to prime for start, Or, a time-delay relay can be used in lieu of the button.

    I have seen electric pumps installed in series with the mechanical pump. In addition to the heat issues, this arrangement can fill the crankcase with fuel in the event of a diaphragm failure. Bad idea.
    Jim Bradley
    Palmyra, VA
    '78 Avanti II

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rerun View Post
    I would strongly suggest that anyone installing an electric pump would abandon the mechanical pump entirely and run the fuel line directly to the carburetor. The mechanical pump is firmly bolted to the block, and gets quite hot. This can cause vapor lock problems in the pump itself at idle, or in the carb, since the pump serves to "pre-heat" the fuel. The electric pump delivers much cooler fuel, and reduces the chance of vapor lock. I would also recommend installing the electric pump with an oil pressure switch to shut it down in the case of a crash or engine failure. A momentary (push button) switch can be used to run the pump to prime for start, Or, a time-delay relay can be used in lieu of the button.

    I have seen electric pumps installed in series with the mechanical pump. In addition to the heat issues, this arrangement can fill the crankcase with fuel in the event of a diaphragm failure. Bad idea.
    Ditto Ditto and Ditto
    sals54

  16. #16
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbisacca View Post

    My other Champ is a 289 with AFB carb. I used to remove air cleaner and pour some gas into carb.
    No need to remove the air cleaner. Just loosen the wing nut on the top and pour some fuel into the depression on the top of the air cleaner. The fuel will run down the bolt and into the carb throat. Tighten the nut and start the engine.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
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    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    All good advice above, and I installed a 12 volt Holley electric pump on my 1950 Champion after the modern crap gas destroyed the fuel pump diaphram. On my 1950 Land Cruiser I rebuilt the fuel pump with the kit that stands up to crap gas, and so far it works great as long as the car doesn't set more than 2 or 3 weeks. For longer periods I would prime the intake, and what Roy just suggested is excellent. I was thinking of filling a pump style oil can with gas, then remove the rubber vacuum hose for the wipers, and squirt a shot of gas directly into the intake manifold.

  18. #18
    Speedster Member GTHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beachamp1 View Post
    I am thinking about installing an electric fuel pump to help correct my long cranking time after the car has set for a few days. I am aware that this is a typical problem on older cars due to the evaporation of todays fuel and the fact that they have open vented fuel systems. I have a 63 Lark Daytona, 289 4 barrel. If you have done this I would like to know what electric fuel pump you used and how did it work out. Thank you and have a nice day. Bob.
    Absolutely remove the mechanical pump!!! The plates to cover hole after removing are pretty much universal and inexpensive plus available at part stores. Good Luck.
    don

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioRoy View Post
    I have heard that startling fluid is a good source of blown head gaskets because it is so explosive. If I have to resort to something like that, I use WD-40. There is always a can of that around.

    BTW, I put electric fuel pumps on all my 12 volt cars. They help relieve vapor lock in the hot California climate, particularly at altitude. They are mounted like Bensherb's pictures.

    +1 on this, I blew a head gasket on an old champion engine.

  20. #20
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    Good points all. Another feature I always use is a hidden mini toggle switch (In the console ashtray in my GT Hawk) which also works as a theft deterrent as the whole fuel system is deactivated. Additionally, it makes running the carbs (2- 4 bbls in my case) bone dry prior to extended storage without doing any draining or other preparation whatever. Mine has been in place since 1968 and is wonderful: Conelec - theCoralsnake.com

    www.thecoralsnake.com/Conelec


    Luck to all.

    Bill

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    lot of low wing aircraft have an electric fuel pump in addition to the mechanical pump on the engine. When you reach an altitude where you could glide back to the airport you switch it off. I have done the same thing with several cars. I like the Bosch mechanical pump. You don't want a cheap vane type as they will not self prime. I wire to acc. with a fuse and a toggle switch. Turn it on , wait a few seconds and start the car. They are a real starter-saver! When started I switch it off. When your mechanical pump fails just flip the switch and continue on your way. Back-ups are nice - at 7000ft a back up fuel pump could be life saving. In a car it is $ and time saving.

  22. #22
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    When installing an electric pump, be sure to install a fuel filter so that only filtered gas can enter the pump. Foreign debris accounts for many fuel pump failures including the mechanical variety...

  23. #23
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    I agree to avoid ether. The electric pump to prime is an excellent idea. I have done a handful of them.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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