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Thread: Carbs for dual intake for a flat 6

  1. #1
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    Carbs for dual intake for a flat 6

    I have a Offenhauser intake and I have two choices on hand for carbs. I have a few of stromburg bxov 26's or a pair of the WE carter's.
    What would you use? Why?

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    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Use the Stromburgs. I never liked those Carters; personally I've always been partial to the Holley 1900/1904 series carbs, and have usually put three of them on my inline sixes. I did have six on a V8 once though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bensherb View Post
    Use the Stromburgs. I never liked those Carters; personally I've always been partial to the Holley 1900/1904 series carbs, and have usually put three of them on my inline sixes. I did have six on a V8 once though.
    Cool did you make the intake for those or did you find a set up to buy?
    I have a 1950 4 door Commander And a 52 Champion

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    New Shop Name Same tattoo shop
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    27 years in the tattooing biz

  4. #4
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    I've made manifolds, found old ones and modified others to fit what I wanted to try.

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    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    Rick Phillips from the Ozark Trails chapter made his own intake and exhaust.
    Attached Images Attached Images


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    Those are Volkswagen carbs. Solex 32PICT, or something like that. You can buy them brand new.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    I attached a photo of a clean install of the Carters here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...PLIT-MANIFOLDS

    Craig

  8. #8
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    What is the reason for the hot water heating the intake manifold? Does it improve atomization somehow?
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioRoy View Post
    What is the reason for the hot water heating the intake manifold? Does it improve atomization somehow?
    Yes, and east of the Rockies, it prevents carburetor icing.

    jack vines

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    I was thinking opposite of heating the intake. It seems it would be a good way to regulate the temperature in the manifold to prevent heat sink into the carbs from the exhaust. No? Maybe?
    sals54

  11. #11
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Yes, and east of the Rockies, it prevents carburetor icing.

    jack vines
    Since the manifold is below the carburetors, how can heating it prevent icing? Isn't carburetor icing microscopic and a function of air temperature, air flow rate and humidity?
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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    If the carbs are bolted to a warm manifold, they will get heated enough to prevent icing. Usually. Another anti-icing measure was the warm air intake hose and flapper valve, often seen on '70's-era cars. I had a VW dune buggy in Vancouver, B.C. and it very definitely suffered from carb icing. I would be driving along, and it would gradually lose power, and the accelerator pedal would not return to idle. I would get out, and see the carb body covered with white frost. Take off the air cleaner, and there would be a ball of ice in the venturi. It would all melt in a minute or two as warmth from the engine drifted up to the carb, and I could proceed again. Happened mostly on cool, foggy days. Vancouver gets a lot of cool, foggy days in Winter.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    Same with my old (no intake heat) 36 horse Beetle.
    40's degrees and humidity was all it took to ice up that carb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioRoy View Post
    What is the reason for the hot water heating the intake manifold? Does it improve atomization somehow?
    Quote Originally Posted by skyway View Post
    Same with my old (no intake heat) 36 horse Beetle.
    40's degrees and humidity was all it took to ice up that carb.
    Germany is the coldest, foggiest place I ever lived. That Herr Dr. Porsche would design an engine in that climate with no carb heat just boggles the mind.

    jack vines

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    Well, the VW engines did have carb heat. The intake manifold had a parallel tube, of smaller size, that ran from #4 exhaust port to #2 exhaust port. An exhaust crossover. Problem is, it was a long, slender tube, and prone to getting clogged by carbon. And the engines of VW sedans were in an engine compartment, which retained some heat. In a dune buggy, the engine hangs out in the open.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
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    I had a VW
    when stationed in Germany. Never had the carb ice up but now the windshield that was a different matter. Drive with one hand scrape ice with the other.

  17. #17
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    With dual carbs on 4" manifolds, carb icing has never been an issue on my VW's , heck I don't even have chokes. Fuel perculation after shutting the engine off is though.

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    FI from motorcycles

    OK, just thinking out loud here.....I've seen new motorcycles with fuel injection units that look like carbs.......and....Triumph has a three cylinder bike......three little carb looking fuel injectors on a little six with a split exhaust......Hmmmmmm

    for reference, a new Triumph Rocket III is a 140 cubic inch engine......and currently the largest displacement motorcycle engine
    Last edited by nwi-region-rat; 12-29-2018 at 04:06 PM. Reason: forgot something

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    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwi-region-rat View Post
    OK, just thinking out loud here.....I've seen new motorcycles with fuel injection units that look like carbs.......and....Triumph has a three cylinder bike......three little carb looking fuel injectors on a little six with a split exhaust......Hmmmmmm
    No problem. You just need time and money.


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  20. #20
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwi-region-rat View Post
    OK, just thinking out loud here.....I've seen new motorcycles with fuel injection units that look like carbs.......and....Triumph has a three cylinder bike......three little carb looking fuel injectors on a little six with a split exhaust......Hmmmmmm

    for reference, a new Triumph Rocket III is a 140 cubic inch engine......and currently the largest displacement motorcycle engine
    Makes sense to me. I've put car carbs on motorcycles many times.

  21. #21
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordr View Post
    If the carbs are bolted to a warm manifold, they will get heated enough to prevent icing. Usually. Another anti-icing measure was the warm air intake hose and flapper valve, often seen on '70's-era cars. I had a VW dune buggy in Vancouver, B.C. and it very definitely suffered from carb icing. I would be driving along, and it would gradually lose power, and the accelerator pedal would not return to idle. I would get out, and see the carb body covered with white frost. Take off the air cleaner, and there would be a ball of ice in the venturi. It would all melt in a minute or two as warmth from the engine drifted up to the carb, and I could proceed again. Happened mostly on cool, foggy days. Vancouver gets a lot of cool, foggy days in Winter.
    That is interesting. Having never seen carburetor icing, I envisioned it to be microscopic in size and buried deep inside the carburetor.
    Last edited by RadioRoy; 01-03-2019 at 09:54 PM.
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    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioRoy View Post
    That is interesting. Having never seen carburetor icing, I envisioned it to be microscopic in size.
    I am trying to remember if I ever heard anyone talk about a carburetor on a car icing. I have always associated it with airplanes.


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  23. #23
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    The exterior of the carb on my '60 Beetle would literally be coated with a very fragile frost that would melt to the touch; kinda like a lightly frosted windshield in the morning.

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    1975 Pontiac T/A, 455 with Carter Thermoquad (sp?) and an non stock open to outside air hood scoop, Green Bay WI in the early spring = often iced up carb. It didn't help that I put the non stock Carter T-Quad on which didn't have exhaust heat ability with the GM engine. It was a 4 speed car and with the open air hood scoop that T-Quad would just howl.....sometimes the old days were good! Sherm / Green Bay

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    Several condition factors have to all come together at the same time for carb ice to occur, mainly humidity and temperature. I drove a carb equipped car to work for 20 plus years and only on high humidity days 80 - 100 percent with an air temperature of about 40 degrees the carb ice would be deadly. There were several ways of managing the issue I frequently used a block heater so that I was operating with a warm engine at start-up, others would pre-warm their engine. Most carburetors had a high speed idle setting and the engine would warm up and overcome the icing conditions. If your driving habits were such that you did not recognize when icing was about to occur there was a good chance you would stall at the light, you may be lucky and restart or may not. This usually required a little Fred Astair on the throttle, a quick pop into neutral feed some fuel and hope the light stayed red long enough to rid the ice after a couple of red lights you were usually ok. Many drivers did not recognize the condition and there were many stalled vehicles within the first 5 - 10 minutes of start-up. If you managed to drive on an open road and did not have to stop at traffic lights you would not experience the conditions (except in VWs). You would hear people say I have never had such a problem that could be because of the routing and traffic conditions and time of travel. If a person travels at 4 - 5 am or 8 - 9 am with traffic or with out traffic can make all the difference. When fuel injection was introduced carb ice was history. Some people would wrap heat synk tape around the base of the carb particularly when they were driving short distances to and from work when the carb would not get hot enough in either direction to prevent icing. The only cure for those conditions was a block heater, I used a block heater frequently however others felt that a block heater was not necessary in this country. Their cars were in the shop frequently trying to fix an unfixable problem they would get a tune up, the temperature and humidity would change and become favourable and the car ran just fine until the next time and the issue would cycle all over again.

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