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Thread: Dec 7 1941 " Day of Infamy"

  1. #1
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    Dec 7 1941 " Day of Infamy"

    Who coined that phrase in the title and why?? If you know the answer, ask a young or old person. drive with your lights on during daylight hours. Ask 10 people over the age of 18 and report back the percentage who have the correct answer. jimmijim
    Last edited by jimmijim8; 12-07-2018 at 08:28 AM.
    Anything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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    President Member 345 DeSoto's Avatar
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    I'll bet the "Media" will only give the Date a passing notice. BTW the Infamy was from FDR's Declaration of War speech on 8 Dec...

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Every year it still comes to mind.

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ghlight=infamy

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ghlight=infamy

    And I doubt it will ever be 'forgotten'. Sir Winston Churchill came up with that term, "This Day of Infamy will live forever" when Britain was invaded in 1940.

    Here in Canada, our headlights have been 'on' since 1990 when DRL's became law for all new vehicles sold here.

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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    I'll bet the "Media" will only give the Date a passing notice. BTW the Infamy was from FDR's Declaration of War speech on 8 Dec...
    FDR's opening words before Congress, Monday December 8, 1941:

    Yesterday, December 7 1941, a date that will live in infamy, the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by the naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

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    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    As Bill points out, the words were "...a date which will live in infamy". Not "day" as in the title of this thread. A common misquote.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    My uncle died on the Arizona that day and Nov 7, 1942 my father was born - child number 13 and the person who left me an Avanti on his passing a few years back. Here is an article on my uncle -

    Fireman First Class Hiram Dennis Harris
    One of First to Die in World War II
    Hiram Harris has the dubious distinction of being one of the very first of over 300,000 Americans to die in WWII.
    Born July 7, 1920 in Coweta County but raised in West Spalding County the child of Jams Render and Bessie Couch Harris, Hiram was the oldest of a brood of thirteen children.
    The Great Depression was going full blast. Jobs were worse than scarce and cash money was non-existent for a family of fifteen. Without many other options, Hiram left school after attending Zetella Grammar School and joined the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937 at age 17. That lead to him working for a time on public works projects in Oregon.
    At age 20 and still looking for greener pastures, Hiram enlisted in the U.S. Navy on July, 23, 1940 and was assigned to the 30,000-ton battleship USS Arizona.
    On December 7, 1941 the 21-year-old sailor, now a Fireman First Class, was on board the Arizona then docked in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii when the Japanese Imperial Fleet launched the sneak attack that catapulted America into WWII.
    At approximately 8:00 AM the first wave of Japanese dive bombers swept across the harbor and attacked the helpless battleship and other American warships anchored there. Within minutes the Arizona suffered a direct hit that triggered a chain reaction explosion in the ships forward powder magazine that simultaneously gutted the ship and collapsed the forward superstructure, trapping hundreds of sailors that had survived the actual explosion.
    Initially reported to his devastated family as “missing in action” it was months before Hiram was officially declared dead. But the three brothers who were then of eligible age – W.E., Houston and Melvin – are said to accepted harsh reality immediately and took Hiram’s death as a “personal affront”. They enlisted immediately to do their best to “get even”.
    Over the decade that encompassed WWII eight of Hiram’s bothers likewise joined in to do their part. Of the nine Harris brothers that served in the military during that era ironically only Hiram lost his life and it was in the first hour of the first day of the fighting that lasted four years.
    Seaman First Class Hiram Harris died with 1,116 other sailors on the Arizona. He is entombed there with 900 other Sailors and Marines in the remains of the battleship still resting on the bottom of Pearl Harbor.
    American Legion Post 15 is named, in part, after the young Spalding County man who proved to be the first of 100 local victims of the fighting during World War II.
    Although PFC Harris did not come home alive, a community now honors the World War II, soldier. Harris will be honored with an individual plaque to be installed in Historic Downtown Griffin. The plaque is sponsored by Southern Rivers Energy.

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    Chris,
    Thank you for posting your personal memoir honoring your uncle.
    We should never forget these brave men & women who gave selflessly for future generations (us).
    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1970Avanti View Post
    My uncle died on the Arizona that day and Nov 7, 1942 my father was born - child number 13 and the person who left me an Avanti on his passing a few years back. Here is an article on my uncle -

    Fireman First Class Hiram Dennis Harris
    One of First to Die in World War II
    Hiram Harris has the dubious distinction of being one of the very first of over 300,000 Americans to die in WWII.
    Born July 7, 1920 in Coweta County but raised in West Spalding County the child of Jams Render and Bessie Couch Harris, Hiram was the oldest of a brood of thirteen children.
    The Great Depression was going full blast. Jobs were worse than scarce and cash money was non-existent for a family of fifteen. Without many other options, Hiram left school after attending Zetella Grammar School and joined the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937 at age 17. That lead to him working for a time on public works projects in Oregon.
    At age 20 and still looking for greener pastures, Hiram enlisted in the U.S. Navy on July, 23, 1940 and was assigned to the 30,000-ton battleship USS Arizona.
    On December 7, 1941 the 21-year-old sailor, now a Fireman First Class, was on board the Arizona then docked in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii when the Japanese Imperial Fleet launched the sneak attack that catapulted America into WWII.
    At approximately 8:00 AM the first wave of Japanese dive bombers swept across the harbor and attacked the helpless battleship and other American warships anchored there. Within minutes the Arizona suffered a direct hit that triggered a chain reaction explosion in the ships forward powder magazine that simultaneously gutted the ship and collapsed the forward superstructure, trapping hundreds of sailors that had survived the actual explosion.
    Initially reported to his devastated family as “missing in action” it was months before Hiram was officially declared dead. But the three brothers who were then of eligible age – W.E., Houston and Melvin – are said to accepted harsh reality immediately and took Hiram’s death as a “personal affront”. They enlisted immediately to do their best to “get even”.
    Over the decade that encompassed WWII eight of Hiram’s bothers likewise joined in to do their part. Of the nine Harris brothers that served in the military during that era ironically only Hiram lost his life and it was in the first hour of the first day of the fighting that lasted four years.
    Seaman First Class Hiram Harris died with 1,116 other sailors on the Arizona. He is entombed there with 900 other Sailors and Marines in the remains of the battleship still resting on the bottom of Pearl Harbor.
    American Legion Post 15 is named, in part, after the young Spalding County man who proved to be the first of 100 local victims of the fighting during World War II.
    Although PFC Harris did not come home alive, a community now honors the World War II, soldier. Harris will be honored with an individual plaque to be installed in Historic Downtown Griffin. The plaque is sponsored by Southern Rivers Energy.


    Thank you for the thoughtful story of your uncle who served on the ill-fated Arizona. It by far surpasses Google which again has chosen to ignore this important historical event this year...

  9. #9
    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Related to this day is this article several years ago on the Hemmings Daily Blog. Reading some of the memories / comments posted honestly choked me up:

    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2014/0...on-proceeding/
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    USS Arizona (BB-39) blew up at 8:07 AM (Hawaii time), when a 16" naval shell (obviously dropped from a plane) fitted with wooden fins penetrated the forecastle to the right of turret #2, went thru the main deck and exploded in the black powder magazine (used for saluting guns). This explosion set off the forward magazines. The Arizona lifted up several feet, then settled down to the bottom of the harbor, the forward decks collapsed, the superstructure and the forward tripod mast leaned forward.

    This entire sequence of events was captured by an army doctor using a Super 8 movie camera (with color film) while stationed aboard the USS Solace, a USN hospital ship moored several hundred yards WNW of the Arizona.

    The doctor was panning the harbor when the Arizona exploded. The camera was dislodged, then after a few seconds, the doctor recovered and the film shows the smoke and sheets of flame.

    The original color film was lost at some point in the 1950's, the image was also reversed, so when viewed today, the main tripod mast is shown at the far right in the film.

    The Japanese attack actually began at approx 7:55 AM when a plane strafed the sub base.

    But WE fired the first shots of the Pacific War! Over an hour before the attack began, the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) sank a midget sub off the harbor entrance.

    When Admiral Halsey viewing the destruction from his flagship USS Enterprise (CV-6) when his task force arrived later that day said:

    "When we get thru with 'em, the Japanese language will only be spoken in hell!"
    Last edited by WinM1895; 12-07-2018 at 05:51 PM.

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    President Member StudeNewby's Avatar
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    My father, Walter Harold Davis, turned 17 on December 7, 1941. A little more than a year later, he was drafted and served honorably in the Army Corps of Engineers under General Mark Clark. The truck in my photo at left is in honor of him, and I think of him every time I drive it. He passed in 2005.
    Last edited by StudeNewby; 12-07-2018 at 08:49 PM. Reason: Corrected date
    Mike Davis
    Regional Manager, North Carolina
    1964 Champ 8E7-122 "Stuey"

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    President Member 62champ's Avatar
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    Any good speaker will make changes up to the moment they start their opening lines - this is the original typed copy of the speech with Roosevelt's changes, including deciding to use 'infamy' in place of what was originally chosen...


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    President Member 48skyliner's Avatar
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    My first awareness of the concept of "conspiracy theory" was when I was in junior high school, early 1950s, and I read about the belief some people had that FDR deliberately left Pearl Harbor undefended because he wanted to get us into the war before things got much worse than the were. After all these years, and reading so many books on the subject, I do not believe that was true. Over the years as more time went by and more documents were declassified, the "history" is constantly changing. The most recent new information I have seen suggests that Stalin knew about the attack, but did nothing because he wanted the Japanese to be tied up elsewhere and less likely to attack him in Siberia. Who else knew? I find it fascinating that the documents relating to this in England are still classified.
    Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 48skyliner View Post
    My first awareness of the concept of "conspiracy theory" was when I was in junior high school, early 1950s, and I read about the belief some people had that FDR deliberately left Pearl Harbor undefended because he wanted to get us into the war before things got much worse than the were. After all these years, and reading so many books on the subject, I do not believe that was true. Over the years as more time went by and more documents were declassified, the "history" is constantly changing. The most recent new information I have seen suggests that Stalin knew about the attack, but did nothing because he wanted the Japanese to be tied up elsewhere and less likely to attack him in Siberia. Who else knew? I find it fascinating that the documents relating to this in England are still classified.
    Churchill knew, I doubt that FDR did. I've never read anything that said Stalin knew. Russia's intelligence wasn't all that good back then.

    When Churchill contacted Stalin and told him the Germans were about to attack him (June 1941), he didn't believe it. Because of ULTRA, the Brits were reading the German Enigma machine messages and knew what Hitler was doing before some of his commanders did.

    One thing y'all have to remember, FDR was told that our Pacific commanders (Kimmel & Short) were getting all the info decoded by MAGIC, when in fact, they were getting next to none of it! The "Bomb Plot" message for an example.

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    President Member Gunslinger's Avatar
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    Stalin also got the warning about Hitler attacking from his intelligence agent in Japan, Richard Sorge who was acting as a journalist. Stalin disregarded him as well.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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