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Thread: Armistice Day 1918, 100yrs ago

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    President Member Jeff_H's Avatar
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    Armistice Day 1918, 100yrs ago

    Since tomorrow is Veteran's Day aka Armistice Day, aka end of WW1 I thought I would put together this post on some WW1 related stuff I have.

    From 2010 to 2017 I did some remodeling work on my house that was built in 1918.

    I pulled a lot of old newspapers out of the walls. Most of them date from March-September 1918. A even mix or so of the Minneapolis Daily News and the Fargo Forum. Minneapolis Daily News tended to more big headlines that are easier to see so that is what these pictures are of.

    Array of typical headlines:



    March 30, 1918:



    July 19, 1918:



    July 21, 1918:



    August 11, 1918:



    August 13, 1918:



    August 24, 1918:



    They published weekly casualty lists with names and state by rank and status. Here are couple of example.

    August 27, 1918 Casualties.



    September 2, 1918 Casualties:



    My paternal grandma was born in 1897 on the farm near Winsted, MN. She was #4 of 13.

    Her 2 older brothers served in the Army. Family lore is the eldest one was injured in a gas attack and had only 1 working lung the rest of his life.

    Here is great uncle Frank (b 1893) in his uniform on a postcard dated from 1919:



    This M-1917 helmet is either Frank's or his brother Louie's. My aunt has it and I took this photo 4yrs ago.



    I remember grandma referring to WW1 as the "Kaiser war".

    Grandma left the farm at some point and worked as a maid in St Paul for a few years during the WW1 era. I found her listed working for a family in St Paul in the 1920 census. She and grandpa were married in 1921 and they farmed in Renville Co, MN.

    Grandma had a Kodak camera and I have custody of her album from that era and picked out some appropriate photos from it for this post.

    Here is my grandma circa 1918-1919 from the album. Probably taken at her parents farm.



    Grandma must have had a whole different life in St Paul prior to marriage. This album has photos of unknown friends at parks and other attractions. 2 of her other sister's were also working as maids in St Paul and they show up in some pictures.

    These 2 men in uniform in front of some fancy building are an example.



    No idea who this couple is:



    Men in uniform to get on a street car. The sign on the car says "CHARTERED"



    There are some other photos with men in uniform but these are a good example.

    My grandpa (b 1896) was registered to the draft but was never called up apparently.

    Jeff in ND

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    President Member tsenecal's Avatar
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    Thanks for the interesting material, and photos. World war one doesn't get talked about that much any more. War has certainly changed, from that period in time.

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    Jeff,
    Thank you for taking the time to post your very poignant news papers and their headlines. There is very little emphasis about what was achieved in order to get peace in the First World War. A few years ago I was fortunate to have contact with "Smokey Smith", he was the last living Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross for his bravery in Italy during the Second World War. "Google" him and see what an interesting fellow he really was.
    Nine times promoted and nine times demoted. Summoned to Buckingham Palace to receive his VC from the king, the army locked him up afraid he’d prefer a party to the medal. “There’s a town full of women and here I am in jail,” he later lamented to this newspaper. Yet after his military career he won wide praise for community service.


    Our heroes are departing and should never be forgotten.
    Bill

    ,

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    My father was born in 1902 so he was just a little too young to go to the Great War, but not too young to work 12 hours a day, six days a week in a factory supporting the war. During WW II, he almost died working on the development of artificial fuels at The Texas Company (Texaco). Of course, neither of these things got him any veteran's benefits. He did get a personal letter from (I think) the Secretary of War thanking him for his efforts.
    Gary L.
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    The sad thing about the last day of the war is that everyone knew the hostities would stop at 11 AM that morning but the Generals on the Allies side ordered an attack at 10AM that morning. The Germans could not believe what was happening and of course fired back killing hunderds of men. If you are into books on WW 1 you might want to read "11th Month, 11th Day 11th Hour" by Joseph Persico.
    Gary Sanders
    Nixa, MO

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    Silver Hawk Member Milaca's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing Jeff. Reading the text from something that was printed at or near the time of the events happening makes the events seem more personal.

    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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    President Member christophe's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting these interesting documents.
    I was not aware that Germans were called "huns" by the US newspapers. Of course, they had p!enty of other interesting surnames around here!
    Nice 11th of November to everyone.

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milaca View Post
    Thanks for sharing Jeff. Reading the text from something that was printed at or near the time of the events happening makes the events seem more personal.

    Ditto. Interesting reading, Jeff; thanks.

    A tip of the hat to all Veterans on this day. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    Did you see this?

    http://time.com/3881527/world-war-i-...918-graphic-2/

    I actually heard the sound track recently, but can't find it again..
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    President Member 62champ's Avatar
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    While looking through an abandoned farm house in about 1980, I came across this book and already being a person who loved the depth and breath of history, asked the owner if I could have it. Although the fly page is missing, it seems to have been printed in late 1918. Printed by Women's Weekly.






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    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    Thanks to all our vets for your sacrifices. Thanks for posting these historic pictures!
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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    President Member BobWaitz's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this. It's fascinating.

    When we redid part of our previous house we also found newspapers in the walls as insulation. It was all "British Expeditionary Force Evacuated from Dunkirk" and "Brits Repel Nazis over London" which tells you when that house was built! I preserved the ones that were in good shape and when we sold the house I made sure the new owner understood what they were and why I was leaving them with him.

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    President Member Jeff_H's Avatar
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    Minor update:

    I sent my cousin who lives in St Paul and is something of a history buff this picture:



    Its been determined this is the front of the former Amherst H Wilder mansion that was located at 266 Summit Ave in St Paul. It was next door to the James J Hill mansion and across the street from the St Paul Cathedral. Torn down in 1959 and some ugly 60s church office building is there now. Built at a cost of $130k in 1887 (~$35M !!! today).

    Also, the photo of g-uncle Frank was most likely taken at a Army garrison near Koblenz Germany. His unit was there as part of the occupation force in 1919. I found some unit history of where and what they were doing that I am glad this motivated me to dig into. He was in some places that came under artillery fire but I don't think was ever in the trenches.

    Jeff in ND

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    My father passed away in 1943 at the age of 49. He was disabled from WWI service. I have his bugle which I treasure.

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    I once came across a reference work of Nebraskans that served in WWI at a friends home years ago. I looked up my great uncle John while I had it in hand. All I recall about great uncle John is by 1970 he had to be at least 75 and I thought that was old. Now that I am nearly 50 years older, 75 doesn't seem that old.

    A couple of weeks ago we had a donation of a book of soldiers portraits from Lancaster County Nebraska for our Heritage Room special collection.
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    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    This year I read a biography of President Harry Truman and it includes an account of his role in WWI. It sounded pretty brutal. I think it had a profound affect on him in ways that ultimately led him to the presidency after Roosevelt died before the end of WWII.
    Ed Sallia
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    We were clearing out my aunt's house after she passed away and found one of my great-uncle's WW1 uniforms. It was amazing to me that they could wear those heavy wool uniforms in the summer. There were even a set of "puttees" with it. We donated it to a museum in Deming, New Mexico. While there we came across an interesting display. They had a German Maxim machine gun that a rancher had found on his property. The rancher lived close to the Mexican border and it was surmised that some of Pancho Villa's men had left it there during the Mexican Revolution.

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