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Thread: Has anyone supercharged a diesel? And what is needed

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    Has anyone supercharged a diesel? And what is needed

    Has anyone supercharged a diesel that is in a Studebaker
    Dwayne Jacobson

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    Ooohhhh that sounds enticing. Do they hold up to the pressure as well as the newer diesels? If so, that would be a game changer.
    I know you're probably not going this route, but some of the new diesel trucks are killin it at the drag strips. 6000 lbs of crew cab pickup turning 9 second qtr mile times with 1500 HP.
    Who knows? Maybe we'll see you out there with your Stude diesel roasting the tires off while tripping the lights at a 10 second qtr mile?????
    sals54

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    Not for me. Someone asked that I post his request
    Dwayne Jacobson

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    You only need an oil feed and oil return tube, then connect the exhaust to it. Back in the 70's when Scout offered a diesel engine, someone turbocharged it, and it got better fuel economy. was quieter out the exhaust, and had more power of course. So it had no down side to the addition of the turbo.

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    All the GMC/Detroit Diesel 53-series 2-stroke engines are supercharged. As a two-stroke diesel engine that does not use crankcase aspiration cannot naturally draw in combustion air, the blower is inherently necessary to charge the cylinders with air for combustion. The blower also assists in scavenging spent combustion gasses at the end of the power stroke. All Series 53 engines use uniflow scavenging, in which a gear-driven Roots blower mounted to the exterior of the engine provides intake air through cored passages in the engine block and ports in the cylinder walls at slightly greater than atmospheric pressure. The engine exhausts through pushrod-operated poppet valves in the cylinder head(s), with either two or four valves per cylinder.

    However, it is possible to add a turbocharger to blow into the supercharger and thus increase the power. A turbocharged version of the engine, which still utilized a blower for scavenging, was offered beginning in 1977.

    More than one ever wanted to know about turbocharging the 53-series is available here: https://www.4btswaps.com/forum/showt...eck-here-first

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 11-08-2018 at 10:28 AM.
    PackardV8

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    President Member raoul5788's Avatar
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    Got a friend who lives down the street from me who runs a diesel dragster. Not sure if he still competes.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e5rZIxpb3k
    Chip
    '63 Cruiser
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWChamp View Post
    You only need an oil feed and oil return tube, then connect the exhaust to it. Back in the 70's when Scout offered a diesel engine, someone turbocharged it, and it got better fuel economy. was quieter out the exhaust, and had more power of course. So it had no down side to the addition of the turbo.
    Yes, but the question asked about a supercharger, not a turbocharger. (I know, they both force air in.)
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    As Jack said the 2 stroke DDC engines had to have a blower. Many DDC 2 strokes were turbocharged. The 6V53 engines are still being built. We are using 300 hp and 350 hp versions. Both are turbocharged. If you wanted to suppercharge the 4-53 engine in a Studebaker truck you could but it wouldn't do any good unless you changed the injectors to inject more fuel
    David L

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    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post
    All the GMC/Detroit Diesel 53-series 2-stroke engines are supercharged. As a two-stroke diesel engine that does not use crankcase aspiration cannot naturally draw in combustion air, the blower is inherently necessary to charge the cylinders with air for combustion. The blower also assists in scavenging spent combustion gasses at the end of the power stroke. All Series 53 engines use uniflow scavenging, in which a gear-driven Roots blower mounted to the exterior of the engine provides intake air through cored passages in the engine block and ports in the cylinder walls at slightly greater than atmospheric pressure. The engine exhausts through pushrod-operated poppet valves in the cylinder head(s), with either two or four valves per cylinder.

    However, it is possible to add a turbocharger to blow into the supercharger and thus increase the power. A turbocharged version of the engine, which still utilized a blower for scavenging, was offered beginning in 1977.

    More than one ever wanted to know about turbocharging the 53-series is available here: https://www.4btswaps.com/forum/showt...eck-here-first

    jack vines
    Jack, just as an aside... the 8V53T was used in the LVTP7 Amphibious Tractor in the Marines starting around 1972. They were blown with GMC superchargers, and the superchargers were fed by a Turbo. They had a max speed of about 40mph unless the governors were bypassed. Then they would do close to 60. Lots of fun on the beaches of Hawaii as we "tested" them after our "repairs". Good fun. And very good engines. The transmissions were another story until they got the bugs worked out of em.
    sals54

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sals54 View Post
    Jack, just as an aside... the 8V53T was used in the LVTP7 Amphibious Tractor in the Marines starting around 1972. They were blown with GMC superchargers, and the superchargers were fed by a Turbo. They had a max speed of about 40mph unless the governors were bypassed. Then they would do close to 60. Lots of fun on the beaches of Hawaii as we "tested" them after our "repairs". Good fun. And very good engines. The transmissions were another story until they got the bugs worked out of em.
    Yes, Sal, the 8V-53T came along in '72, and as a V8 weighs 2,250#, so not a candidate for use in a Stude truck. Since the Studes only used the 3-53 and 4-53, that's why I referenced them as being turbocharged in 1977, which is my best info, but could also be incorrect.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Yes, Sal, the 8V-53T came along in '72, and as a V8 weighs 2,250#, so not a candidate for use in a Stude truck. Since the Studes only used the 3-53 and 4-53, that's why I referenced them as being turbocharged in 1977, which is my best info, but could also be incorrect.

    jack vines
    I got it. I was just pointing to my experience with the 8V. I don't know anything about the others. My diesel exposure started and ended with my stint in the Marines.
    Hawaiian Duty for 2 years. It was rough, but someone had to do it. I'm just glad it was me.
    sals54

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWChamp View Post
    Mamma likey, but Daddy no likey the rusty floor. Remember... I'm a spoiled West Coaster. A bubble in the fender, and I'm thinkin "maybe not.. too much rust". I know, sad. Right?
    BTW, that "knee capper" rear bumper would have to get cut.
    The outside look of the truck if off the hook though. I love it.
    sals54

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    We changed the engine in LVTP7 when we designed the A1 version. Installed the Cummins 903. DDC was insisting that they wouldn't build the 8V53T any longer. The power stayed at 400 hp. The vehicle now has a 525 hp 903.
    David L

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    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Yes, Sal, the 8V-53T came along in '72, and as a V8 weighs 2,250#, so not a candidate for use in a Stude truck. Since the Studes only used the 3-53 and 4-53, that's why I referenced them as being turbocharged in 1977, which is my best info, but could also be incorrect.

    jack vines
    The 8V-53T was designed into the prototypes for the LVTP7 about 1966 and the production of the vehicle started about 1969 and finished in 1973.
    David L

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