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Thread: Declining memberships

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenF View Post
    I've built old Fords, Chevys, and Mopars, my pops used to race in Nascar back in the day ('69-'70) in a Talladega Torino. I've been around cars all my life. And, while not pointing fingers at any specific organization, I've never seen a car culture more centered around the Grouchy Old Man complex than Studebakers. Maybe that's because I never tried to get into Hudsons or Reos...? (BTW my experiences with the Grouchy Old Man complex have been in person, and nothing to do with the club or online persons.)
    Definitely it is not everyone, but by ratio of other sites, I agree. There seems to a be a lot of minor oneupmanship. Sort of like someone saying they could have been the best 5'2" 130 pound wide receiver in the NFL. In the mid sixty's the public decided they didn't want yesterday's technology repackaged and Studebaker cars went away. Now nearing 60 years later some still think the rotation of the earth was altered the day Studebaker ceased.

    Young people today have been brainwashed that cars are evil. That life is to be experienced through a glass screen held in their hand. Does anyone really think that this can be reversed? I'm sure there are the grandson, nephew, kid down the street stories where they took some degree of interest in a Studebaker. But the interest isn't there to the degree that things will turn around. Interest in cars will wain, interest in Studebakers will wain. Enjoy them for what YOU get out of them. But, be realistic in that they were not the end all of the automotive world. Don't be surprised if in the future a (current value $150,000) '60's Hemi Charger is rolled out into a field and for $25 one can fire a shot through that smog causing, resource burning pile of steel as the then public decries the "Automotive Age."
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  2. #82
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    I'm going to have to drop out, so I don't keep hearing about dropping out. LOL

  3. #83
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenF View Post
    I've never seen a car culture more centered around the Grouchy Old Man complex than Studebakers.
    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Young people today have been brainwashed that cars are evil. That life is to be experienced through a glass screen held in their hand.
    Case in point
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  4. #84
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenF View Post
    I've never seen a car culture more centered around the Grouchy Old Man complex than Studebakers. (BTW my experiences with the Grouchy Old Man complex have been in person, and nothing to do with the club or online persons.)
    Our neighborhood 'Mr. Meanie~Get-off-my-lawn!' drove a Lincoln.

    Craig

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Young people today have been brainwashed that cars are evil. That life is to be experienced through a glass screen held in their hand. Does anyone really think that this can be reversed? I'm sure there are the grandson, nephew, kid down the street stories where they took some degree of interest in a Studebaker. But the interest isn't there to the degree that things will turn around. Interest in cars will wain, interest in Studebakers will wain. Enjoy them for what YOU get out of them. But, be realistic in that they were not the end all of the automotive world. Don't be surprised if in the future a (current value $150,000) '60's Hemi Charger is rolled out into a field and for $25 one can fire a shot through that smog causing, resource burning pile of steel as the then public decries the "Automotive Age."
    Hey, I exist! I realize that I'm in the minority of people my age because I actually love and own a Studebaker (as well as automobiles in general), but if I can be here, so will others. Hope is not lost!
    Jake Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

    1962 GT Hawk - completely finished in driveable condition.

  6. #86
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    So we get older. Like my Studebaker's, At 70 I am a relic of my generation. Really, at this point I don't let it bother me that coming generations will not share my enthusiasms. They will never have access to the types of boys toys and automotive experiences that I grew up with.
    I look around and realize what an amazing wonderful life I have been blessed to have had so many hands-on automotive related experiences in.
    I do not expect that anyone born after 1970 will ever be able to comprehend the enthusiasm and thrill of owning, working on, and driving a Oldsmobile Rocket V-8 powered '46 Hudson coupe. Or while working on the assembly line at GM, using down time to fabricate the parts required to build a Buick V-8 powered Bug Eyed Austin Healey Sprite. Or the joint father-son project of building my son's first High School ride, a 302 powered '77 Pinto wagon. (HE will never forget that one) And a hundred other automotive fabrication projects remaining unmentioned.
    Because of the shortage of young men during the Vietnam War, at the age of 16, I was hired on the spot by General Motors.
    I can't help but pity the kids nowadays with their circumstances of limited employment options and limited experiences. It is a FAR different world for them than it was for me.
    My son however, inspired by the hands-on automotive experiences of his youth has went on to become an outstanding Professional Engineer, and now a grandson is following the same career path. So, I am perfectly satisfied with what my automotive passions have provided for my family and our future. They don't need ever OWN a Studebaker, but they all recognize it was old dad's Studebaker dreams that brought them to that fine place they are now in. And for me that is plenty enough.

  7. #87
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    At 70 years old I realize there is a heck of a-lot more in back than in the front:-(
    I am a kid of the 50's, and realize that era that joy will not and could never be repeated.
    I know that most of my pristine collection of classic tube electronics and super rare Lps once worth over 50K are now down to well....it's pitiful.
    The same goes for my Avanti.......beautiful yes, an amazing ten footer yes.....loving owned since 1966 yes......but testing the waters for its sale has left me shuttering......many want to steal it, or low ball an offer that just makes me so mad:-(.....I may just leave it be.....and after i pass allow the family to do with it as they like.....i know sounds harsh.....but when one is dead......sorry for the rant/vent:-(

  8. #88
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    Be happy. We have had, and long enjoyed what 99.99% of humanity has never attained. No sorrow here ...except for those who have never known what they are missing.

  9. #89
    Speedster Member Charlie D's Avatar
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    Let me make it three 70 year old guys in a row. I am glad that the 7 ½ years that it took to get my ’55 road worthy is behind me. I don’t think I can get up and down and around to do it again. I think I am beginning to enjoy the fellowship of fellow club members more as I get older. I know that many of the leaders in our local clubs and at the national level are genuinely concerned about the decrease in membership. I do not look at it as a forest getting smaller but it really hurts when a tree I know well falls.
    Charlie D.

  10. #90
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessie J. View Post
    I can't help but pity the kids nowadays with their circumstances of limited employment options and limited experiences.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hawklover View Post
    I am a kid of the 50's, and realize that era that joy will not and could never be repeated.
    Hmmmm. Where I have I heard these kinds of statements before?....Oh yea. It was in the 50's and 60's from a bunch of grouchy old people. (I wonder if they all owned Studebakers? )
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  11. #91
    President Member cultural infidel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
    Case in point
    Yup. Nailed it. Many can be and are helpful, but others become condescending because things should be so obvious to everyone.


    Was thinking about this when originally posted...
    In regards to diminishing numbers in the club, couldn't give you one solid answer. As a younger guy, this is my take, and not a one-size fits all answer to the issue obviously. I know for my friends, they see the hobby of old cars in general as a luxury that many can't afford. I have had a few walk into my garage and are shocked that I have an old car in the garage, whether it runs or not. They want to get into old cars but can't afford the hobby. Many families live check to check these days. Dropping the investment on an old car seems out of reach. Another obstacle for many is the declining space to store an old car. Many houses are converting garage space into living space leaving no room to comfortably work on a car. And honestly, I could see some not seeing the value in joining the club either. Benefits listed on the Club page aren't a huge draw. That's just me though.
    1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon


  12. #92
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    Originally Posted by wittsend
    Young people today have been brainwashed that cars are evil. That life is to be experienced through a glass screen held in their hand.



    Case in point (Quote)

    I don't see where stating a known fact implies one a "grouchy old man." Or as another stated "condescending." A question was asked as to declining membership and (one of many) verifiable reasons were stated. My position is not based on an innate, disgruntled position. For 23 years I taught 18-23 year olds (primarily) at a community college. I won't belabor the lack of initiative and motivation I saw. Some great kids for sure. But more so I often had a greater concern for the future.

    I have two Millennial adult children. Good kids. My daughter graduated with a BA at 20 years old. She is an accomplished musician (first chair) and an award winning photographer. My son is a State Science Fair Champion. He is the type of kid who DOES works with his hands and is skilled in many diverse areas (designs, machines, welds, 3D prints). All that said try getting the phone away from them. Do I hear Charlton Heston in the background (from my cold dead hands)?

    Rather than the club chasing after growth (or replacement) that logically isn't there, it would seem best to focus on how to best function in a decline. Quality, not quantity. Lastly be thankful that a car you have an affection for still has a following and supply chain nearly 60 yers after it all ended. It may not run that way forever, but for you it was a good run.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  13. #93
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    Well said, for Me it started in 1972 and has been a ton of fun along the way. don't know how much longer,but until then.......

    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Originally Posted by wittsend
    Young people today have been brainwashed that cars are evil. That life is to be experienced through a glass screen held in their hand.



    Case in point (Quote)

    I don't see where stating a known fact implies one a "grouchy old man." Or as another stated "condescending." A question was asked as to declining membership and (one of many) verifiable reasons were stated. My position is not based on an innate, disgruntled position. For 23 years I taught 18-23 year olds (primarily) at a community college. I won't belabor the lack of initiative and motivation I saw. Some great kids for sure. But more so I often had a greater concern for the future.

    I have two Millennial adult children. Good kids. My daughter graduated with a BA at 20 years old. She is an accomplished musician (first chair) and an award winning photographer. My son is a State Science Fair Champion. He is the type of kid who DOES works with his hands and is skilled in many diverse areas (designs, machines, welds, 3D prints). All that said try getting the phone away from them. Do I hear Charlton Heston in the background (from my cold dead hands)?

    Rather than the club chasing after growth (or replacement) that logically isn't there, it would seem best to focus on how to best function in a decline. Quality, not quantity. Lastly be thankful that a car you have an affection for still has a following and supply chain nearly 60 yers after it all ended. It may not run that way forever, but for you it was a good run.
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  14. #94
    President Member Xcalibur's Avatar
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    Old guys die. That's life!

  15. #95
    Silver Hawk Member JRoberts's Avatar
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    This is absolutely the most depressing thread I have seen on this forum. Some accusing younger folks who are not interested in old cars just because they are lazy or worse, which is a groundless accusation. Others complaining about how bad it is to get old (whatever old really is) I fear what anybody new to Studebakers would think when reading this thread. This negativity is the exact reason new folks do not join our number.....
    Last edited by JRoberts; 11-15-2018 at 12:25 AM.
    Joe Roberts
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    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

  16. #96
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    Joe its just a reflection on life, maybe you are not ageing like the rest of us???
    Quote Originally Posted by JRoberts View Post
    This is absolutely the most depressing thread I have seen on this forum. Some accusing younger folks who are not interested in old cars just because they are lazy or worse, which is a groundless accusation. Others complaining about how bad it is to get old (whatever old really is) I fear what anybody new to Studebakers would think when reading this thread. This negativity is the exact reason new folks do not join our number.....

  17. #97
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    None of us get out of this alive!

    I'm just trying desparately to hang onto the shredded remains of my youth!

    Sometimes its just fun to lean back and remember all the car sex we used to have....or at least fantasize about.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallabutt View Post
    I find it strangely humorous the way these innocuous threads seem to always end in a cat fight, over an issue that only exists because of a small minority of owner's mindset. The facts are some people prefer original cars, some people prefer to alter their cars, and a small minority of both groups tend to vocally push back against the perceived proclivity of the other. I doubt that the drop in membership has much to do with this minority divide. Really the only fact that matters is that our membership is ageing and dyeing and there are not enough young people interested in Studebaker. Politicize it if you want, but the facts are not going to change.
    Well said. On 10/17 I became 85 which probably puts me near the top for SDC and probably AARP! The reality is that membership will gradually decline. Efforts to gain new memberships will become more demanding. Car clubs will continue to exist, but with reduced membership. My son said he wants my Avanti and his name is on the title. I told him I didn't want it sitting forever on jack stands in his utility building! He is very handy mechanically, but sometimes his projects last for a considerable time because of his work and other demands on his time. I will try to convince him of the merits and benefits of club membership. There are many.
    "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Bryant View Post
    Well said. On 10/17 I became 85 which probably puts me near the top for SDC and probably AARP! The reality is that membership will gradually decline. Efforts to gain new memberships will become more demanding. Car clubs will continue to exist, but with reduced membership. My son said he wants my Avanti and his name is on the title. I told him I didn't want it sitting forever on jack stands in his utility building! He is very handy mechanically, but sometimes his projects last for a considerable time because of his work and other demands on his time. I will try to convince him of the merits and benefits of club membership. There are many.
    I will second Bob's endorsement of Hallabutt's comment. It seems that no matter what the subject matter, the discussion degrades to an original-vs-rodded peeing contest. I believe it can be just as hard to bring a rust-bucket back to a 399 point restored vehicle as it is to heavily modify a comparable vehicle. Different skills perhaps, but no less difficult. While I admire both the vision and skill of many rodders, I tire of their thin skins when they brag about how drastically they have modified a given vehicle. It's your vision, so be proud -- but don't be surprised if not everyone appreciates what you have done. If you don't want feedback, don't post photos of your work. And by the same token, if the sight of a chopped and channeled 53 Stude gives you heartburn, stick to modern cars. People have been modifying and improving cars to suit themselves since 1898.

  20. #100
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    Back in 1966 my parents gifted me with a 4-speed Avanti thinking I would not attempt to "have my way' with girls in such a cramped space......well never under estimate the will of a 18 year old!......or his "ability" to pile up speeding citations;-(
    Quote Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
    None of us get out of this alive!

    I'm just trying desparately to hang onto the shredded remains of my youth!

    Sometimes its just fun to lean back and remember all the car sex we used to have....or at least fantasize about.
    Last edited by Hawklover; 11-15-2018 at 10:11 PM.

  21. #101
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    Just another perspective piled on...

    It used to be that if you were in the old car hobby, being a club member was almost a requirement because how else would you find parts, solicit advice, or talk to a like-minded individual with the same passion? If you wanted parts, you needed that club magazine to get a vendor's phone number, or to find out the date of the next swap meet so you could dig through tables of parts to find that one item you can't live without. Same with talking to someone that shared your interest, you needed to go to those club meetings to do so.

    Today.. Parts, technical information, advice, camaraderie.. It's all available in your pocket on your smart phone. The way information is shared has changed drastically over the last decade or two. Clubs in general become irrelevant because they can't compete.

    I'm 28 years old. In 2 more years, I'll receive a 20 year pin from SDC. I've literally grown up in this club, and I think the main reason I retain my membership is simply because I always have. My question (for the sake of discussion, I don't expect a literal response).. What does SDC as a whole offer a young enthusiast that they can't find elsewhere? If I need parts, I'm not going to wait for a magazine to show up in the mail, I'll search the major vendors' websites and order what I need. If I want to socialize, I'll join in on a discussion on the Studebaker Addicts Facebook page... Which currently has 19,188 members. If I have a technical problem, I'll poke around on Bob Johnstone's website and find the answer. So, again... What does the SDC offer that can't be easily attained elsewhere? Where is the "need" to be a member? What can my membership in SDC get me that simply cannot be had somewhere else? (And before someone says, "this forum", if this forum failed to exist tomorrow, a non-club affiliated forum would fill the gap in a heartbeat).

    I make my living working at one of the major Studebaker parts stores. We stay busy 40 hours a week (and then some) sending parts out all over the world. The club itself may be on the decline, but there are still a lot of Studebakers being restored and maintained. A lot of our calls are from people that just bought their first Studebaker. The hobby is still strong and active.

    And BTW.. Most everyone I know my age is too swamped with student loans, mortgages, cost of raising a family, etc, to even consider the never-ending expense of an antique car, even if they wanted one. But, generally speaking, cars are still being maintained, restored, driven.. And a lot of money being spent to do so. The club may not be gaining members, but the hobby isn't anywhere close to dead yet.

    Have fun with your car, enjoy your hobby the best way you know how to, and don't waste your life away worrying about what you can't control. In the grand scheme of it all.. It doesn't matter anyway.
    Last edited by mbstude; 11-15-2018 at 06:52 PM.

  22. #102
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    Well said young man!

  23. #103
    Silver Hawk Member JRoberts's Avatar
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    Matthew does have a point. I found a refreshing look at younger folks and the car hobby this summer while on Hot Rod Power Tour. This seven day event visited seven different cities. There were thousands of people and cars involved. It was one of the best automotive events I have ever participated in. The main reason was the diversity of the participants. This includes many people that are Matthew's age. These folks knew cars, loved cars and seemed to enjoy this event. My guess is that their enjoyment was because they were accepted in a positive way no matter what they drove. There were vehicles that were bone stock and some that were highly modified but it did not matter. Everyone was accepting of each other. We need to do that.
    Joe Roberts
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  24. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbstude View Post
    I'm 28 years old. In 2 more years, I'll receive a 20 year pin from SDC. I've literally grown up in this club, and I think the main reason I retain my membership is simply because I always have. My question (for the sake of discussion, I don't expect a literal response).. What does SDC as a whole offer a young enthusiast that they can't find elsewhere? If I need parts, I'm not going to wait for a magazine to show up in the mail, I'll search the major vendors' websites and order what I need. If I want to socialize, I'll join in on a discussion on the Studebaker Addicts Facebook page... Which currently has 19,188 members. If I have a technical problem, I'll poke around on Bob Johnstone's website and find the answer. So, again... What does the SDC offer that can't be easily attained elsewhere? Where is the "need" to be a member? What can my membership in SDC get me that simply cannot be had somewhere else? (And before someone says, "this forum", if this forum failed to exist tomorrow, a non-club affiliated forum would fill the gap in a heartbeat).
    Your observations are keen and on point. And herein lies the anchor around the neck of the older generation. As I said before, I'm 64, but I'm always trying to learn new things. Some of the "folks" are still not comfortable with a computer, let alone working all the other aspects of online meanderings. People have been trying to get the SDC to get into the modern world for decades. Remember how long it took just to get a Forum set up? And then the primary concern for those "folks" was just how were they going to make money from the freeloaders. I remember these discussions from many years ago. It should not have been this tough to make the SDC a profitable online venture. Especially with as many members as they had. Now it's an uphill battle, only because of the delay in getting on board. The Turning Wheels was the roadblock to much of the modernization. They were afraid of the monetary loss in the move to an online based magazine. Most periodicals have moved to an online presence now. They still put out the printed stock, but couple that with an online source. The SDC had many opportunities to monetize a site with sales of magazines, clothing, hardware, curios etc. They were just quite late to get there. In the interim, people searched elsewhere and found other sources.
    sals54

  25. #105
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sals54 View Post
    They were just quite late to get there. In the interim, people searched elsewhere and found other sources.
    Maintaining the status quo is a very powerful force...especially for us "older" types.
    Dick Steinkamp
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  26. #106
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    "Studebaker Addicts Facebook page"

    Matt,
    And where is this page? I'm with Sal at 64 and looking for an inclusive group that appreciates Studebakers, '63 - '64 Avantis, included so that we can converse without the baggage of the purity of the brand that has some member's knickers in a knot.There are (10) letters on the trunk of my '63 Avanti starting with "S" and ending with "R" that I thought meant that this car was a Studebaker.
    "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
    R.W. Emerson

  27. #107
    Silver Hawk Member Studedude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dleroux View Post
    "Studebaker Addicts Facebook page"

    Matt,
    And where is this page?
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/2209...?ref=bookmarks

    Dave Lester

  28. #108
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    There are long term effects that Facebook or other similar means of conversation tend to cause. Facebook is like conversing on a 10-party line phone with someone else who also has a 10-party line phone. It's cool if all the people talk about the same thing, but it's nearly impossible to find the important conversation where that Joe185frd who popped in for a month two years ago, detailed how he resolved the problem you're having now. The other downside, is that it tends to slow or even kill the forums, like this one, where that information is stored and can be retrieved with the search function. When the local AZ Mopar forum created a Facebook page, the forum died in less than a year. The local Corvette forum was going strong with nearly 2,000 members and having upwards of 200 posts daily, until someone started a Facebook page 2 years ago and now the forum has less than 50 posts a week.

    I'm just saying there are good things and bad things and realizing they exist can help you go forward. Personally, I don't do the Facebook thing, since the search function is important to me. YMMV

  29. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    It may not run that way forever, but for you it was a good run.
    I am still running, has been a good run, still IS a good run. I continue to ENJOY many aspects of my Studebaker ownership experience. Otherwise I would not still be on here. A grumpy old man

  30. #110
    Silver Hawk Member Bob Andrews's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HOXXOH View Post
    There are long term effects that Facebook or other similar means of conversation tend to cause. Facebook is like conversing on a 10-party line phone with someone else who also has a 10-party line phone. It's cool if all the people talk about the same thing, but it's nearly impossible to find the important conversation where that Joe185frd who popped in for a month two years ago, detailed how he resolved the problem you're having now. The other downside, is that it tends to slow or even kill the forums, like this one, where that information is stored and can be retrieved with the search function. When the local AZ Mopar forum created a Facebook page, the forum died in less than a year. The local Corvette forum was going strong with nearly 2,000 members and having upwards of 200 posts daily, until someone started a Facebook page 2 years ago and now the forum has less than 50 posts a week.

    I'm just saying there are good things and bad things and realizing they exist can help you go forward. Personally, I don't do the Facebook thing, since the search function is important to me. YMMV
    It must be you don’t know about the very easy to use search function for any Facebook page. Go to the page, and at the top of the page where of the URL normally goes it will say ‘search in Studebaker Addicts International’ or whatever page you’re on. You put a keyword or key phrase in there and hit search and boom, all of the subjects with that word come up. It’s far easier to use than the search on this forum, which frequently does not work.

    I would post a picture or two to show an example, but it’s too much hassle to have to do a screenshot, go to some photo hosting site, upload it, then get a URL to post here. On Facebook, you just instantly add them.

  31. #111
    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    Facebook is a good way to waste time. My family is all over there though. I somehow got two memberships and don't know how to delete one. Also I don't know how to do most of the things you can do so my images are like a reflection of what is actually going on over there.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  32. #112
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HOXXOH View Post
    <snip> Personally, I don't do the Facebook thing, since the search function is important to me. YMMV
    Good point, but.....
    A good header makes for a good search.
    Something that is the responsibility of the thread originator.
    That discipline is lacking here...and on Facebook.

    The issue (won't say it is a problem) is that anyone can make a Facebook page about anything.
    Again, the title makes it searchable. The 'Studebaker Addicts" page on Facebook is quite active.
    But you would never find it without searching for 'addicts'....
    (and that runs you right off the Facebook cliff of doom).

    The trendy and Internet current crowd will gravitate toward Facebook because it is easy, and easy to share.
    The stodgy, stubborn, and recalcitrant SDC forum crowd will stick with what they know.
    And that is OK.
    Heck, The Dick Datson stapled scrapbook posts shows up here every six months or so...
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  33. #113
    President Member Son O Lark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    In the mid sixty's the public decided they didn't want yesterday's technology repackaged and Studebaker cars went away.

    "
    Ahh, so that is why they ceased production.

  34. #114
    President Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Son O Lark View Post
    Ahh, so that is why they ceased production.
    From my opinion, retrospectively, yes. Chrysler, Ford, GM even AMC were building unibody cars with new, lightweight V-8 engines. Studebaker was not. I'm sure the demise can be argued for all the corporate reasons as well, but in the end if they were building a car the public wanted in profitable numbers they likely would have continued in business.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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