Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Freeze plug

  1. #1
    Commander Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Mansfield Texas
    Posts
    36

    Angry Freeze plug

    Anyone know off hand the freeze plug diameter for a 289?
    I lost one today on a drive,
    I hope the engine wasn't damaged

  2. #2
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Damascus, OR
    Posts
    1,666
    You didn’t tell us the year of the engine. The diameter is 1-1/2”. But...an earlier engine, up to mid-1962 would use 1-1/2” disc plugs. A mid-1962 and later engine would use 1-1/2” shallow cup plugs.

  3. #3
    Commander Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Mansfield Texas
    Posts
    36
    It’s a 63 & has shallow brass cups
    just didn’t know the diameter
    thanks

  4. #4
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Tracy / Goleta Ca.
    Posts
    935
    I just swapped out all the plugs in my 289 ('64). I used this kit, they fit great, had a bunch of stuff left over for future projects too. Not bad for 11 bucks. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pioneer-PE-...xj-W:rk:2:pf:0

  5. #5
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Damascus, OR
    Posts
    1,666
    Yes, 1-1/2” cup soft plugs - maybe the only thing that fits both Studebaker 289” engines and Ford 289” engines.

  6. #6
    President Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    british columbia
    Posts
    1,173
    It is equally important that the block has the casting lip inside the expansion hole for the plug to stop against so it can be set. If not a different design plug may be required such as a Dorman style expansion plug. On my 259 block the casting lip was rotted away and would not accept the standard plug.

  7. #7
    President Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Westbrook, MN
    Posts
    684
    Just a helpful Hint. Dave, the machinist that I use, said that he puts them in with red threadlocker. I've also found that Chinese freeze plugs do not fit snugly. This prompted me to adopt Dave's technique and abandon Permatex. I don't imagine those rubber expanding types would be good for much more than 10 yrs. but freeze plugs are super difficlt to install with the engine in the car

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ferndale, WA, USA.
    Posts
    28,494
    Quote Originally Posted by altair View Post
    It is equally important that the block has the casting lip inside the expansion hole for the plug to stop against so it can be set. If not a different design plug may be required such as a Dorman style expansion plug. On my 259 block the casting lip was rotted away and would not accept the standard plug.
    This is not an issue with a Late '62 to '64 Block like the OP's '63 has, because the Core Plugs are not Disc Type, they are Standard CUP Type as noted in Posts 3, 4, and 5.

    289 Ford Core plug Kit.jpg This is the Ford 221, 260, 289, 302 and 351 Kit with parts that are not needed on a Stude. included, but ARE the somewhat Hard to find 1 1/2" VERY Shallow Cup Type.

    Being very shallow, they will not hit on the portions of the Old early Block Ledge that some Late Blocks still have, too early before being seated,.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 11-03-2018 at 07:38 PM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




  9. #9
    President Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    british columbia
    Posts
    1,173
    DSC09822.JPGDSC09823.JPGI was suggesting the Dorman expansion style not the rubber type, I can see now how the cup type would work as it is about .009 over 1 1/2" for a tight fit. It would be imperative that it would have to go in square. The Dorman style would be a little bit easier to install with the engine in the car

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •