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Thread: Studebakers on a Nash used car lot.

  1. #1
    Silver Hawk Member JRoberts's Avatar
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    Studebakers on a Nash used car lot.

    Found this on today's The Old Motor site. Five Studebakers on a Nash used car lot.

    http://theoldmotor.com/?p=172098#comment-285903
    Joe Roberts
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    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    Cool Old Nash Used Car Lot pic!

    I see a '56 Flight Hawk or Power Hawk, a Late '55 4 Door Sedan, a '53/'54 Starliner Hardtop, a '53/'54 Starlight Coupe and a '52 4 Door Sedan on the Lot.

    The roof portion in the Lower Left corner resembles a '59 Lark Hardtop but that is too New for the 1957 Pic Date.

    I just do not see ANYONE with a brain turning in all those Cool Studes. for any kind of a NASH or a Hash !

    They had to have bought them off of a Studebaker used Car Lot or even Chev./Ford lot. Being also a Independent Make they might have sold well on a Nash Lot.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 10-13-2018 at 03:16 PM.
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    The Studebakers, and even the Cadillac, on the used-car lot sure don't make the Nashes look appealing, do they?
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    were the Nash sixes as gutless as the Studebaker sixes ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kmul221 View Post
    were the Nash sixes as gutless as the Studebaker sixes ?
    Like Studebaker, Nash had a small flathead 6-cyl which was gutless. The larger cars had a 235" OHV6 which had better performance.

    A tidbit of interest, Nash management had some guts Studebaker lacked. They partnered with Donald Healey.
    A Nash engine with dual carbs, was used in the '51-'54 Nash Healey; for sale years before the Corvette or Thunderbird. A lightweight racing Nash-Healey purpose-built for the race finished 3rd at Le Mans.



    jack vines
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    Silver Hawk Member Studedude's Avatar
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    Looks like it would be a three ring circus if someone wanted to test drive anything that wasn't on the front row!


    Downing-Nash-.jpg
    Last edited by Studedude; 10-13-2018 at 06:17 PM.

    Dave Lester

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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    According to the Nash Dealer website (nashparts.com), Downing Nash was located at 486 Peachtree Street N.W. Atlanta GA and was in business 1954/56.

    So, if this info is factual, the pic couldn't have been taken in 1957.

    I googled earthed the address, building is gone, replaced by a huge modern parking garage.

    There's a similar looking 3 story building kitty-corner across the street, but it's not the same as it has 6 windows, not 5.
    Last edited by WinM1895; 10-13-2018 at 06:13 PM.

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    Speedster Member Stude Shoo-wop!'s Avatar
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    While a lot of companies can claim some connection to the late American Motors Corporation, only Nash is virtually intertwined with it. It seemed that all AMC cars exuded the same Nash philosophy of providing a good value for money with a bit of delightful weirdness thrown on top. The Nash-Healey was an interesting performer but I don't think it would have lasted anyway given the fickle U.S. market towards newcomers.
    Jake Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

    1962 GT Hawk - completely finished in driveable condition.

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    "No Obligation" if you'd like to see the new Nash Healey in the showroom of Palma Motors without being bothered with sales talk. Just clip the coupon and pin it to your lapel! (Click on the image to enlarge.)

    palmanashad.jpg

    September 23 and 24, 1954....

    BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    "I just do not see ANYONE with a brain turning in all those Cool Studes. for any kind of a NASH or a Hash !

    They had to have bought them off of a Studebaker used Car Lot or even Chev./Ford lot. Being also a Independent Make they might have sold well on a Nash Lot."

    I was thinking the same thing, who in their right mind would trade in a Studebaker on a Nash?
    I think you are right that they needed something that would actually sell, so they stocked used Studebakers.

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    "I just do not see ANYONE with a brain turning in all those Cool Studes. for any kind of a NASH or a Hash !
    Several of us here on this thread admit to having the occasional lapse of memory, but really, there was a long span when Studebakers were just very low value used cars. My memory is good enough to recall when $50 would buy an everyday driver Stude. A local fast-talking-used-car dealer ran TV ads and at the end there would be a few "fishing cars" and usually one Stude among them. The idea was these cars were so thoroughly depreciated, a few dead fish wouldn't lower the value.

    jack vines
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    Keep in mind that there is no indication that any of these Studebakers were traded in on a Nash. They could have been purchased wholesale by the dealer, a practice still common today. They could have been traded in on a newer or different car of another brand. They could have been traded in at the dealer next door (Mercedes, etc.) which may have been connected to the Nash dealership in ownership, but not had their own used car lot.

    I have worked at a couple and know of many used car lots where several cars had to be moved to get to the one that you want. In some places, like Main Street dealerships, space is at a premium. I even worked at a new car dealership that had a storage lot about half a mile away. They had a runner that just shuttled cars back and forth.
    Gary L.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    "No Obligation" if you'd like to see the new Nash Healey in the showroom of Palma Motors without being bothered with sales talk. Just clip the coupon and pin it to your lapel! (Click on the image to enlarge.)

    palmanashad.jpg

    September 23 and 24, 1954....

    BP
    The "delivered in Paris" got me wondering why a USA, England, Italy car would be priced as delivered in France, then I remembered that your father's dealership was in Paris, IL.
    Gary L.
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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    "No Obligation" if you'd like to see the new Nash Healey in the showroom of Palma Motors without being bothered with sales talk. Just clip the coupon and pin it to your lapel!

    September 23 and 24, 1954....
    Did you dad actually sell any Nash Healeys at that price?!??

    What does your wonderful American Car Catalog show for Cadillac prices for 1954?

    Craig

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Did you dad actually sell any Nash Healeys at that price?!??

    What does your wonderful American Car Catalog show for Cadillac prices for 1954?

    Craig
    Not Bob and I don't have a "...wonderful...Catalog". A 1954 Eldorado convertible (top of the line) listed for $4738.
    Gary L.
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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    Not Bob and I don't have a "...wonderful...Catalog". A 1954 Eldorado convertible (top of the line) listed for $4738.
    Thanks for the Eldorado price, which is $1362 less than that Nash Healey. I suspect it would have been almost enough left over to also buy a plain-Jane Chevrolet two door sedan.

    I wonder if Palma Motors sold any brand new Nash Healeys.

    Craig

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Thanks for the Eldorado price, which is $1362 less than that Nash Healey. I suspect it would have been almost enough left over to also buy a plain-Jane Chevrolet two door sedan.

    I wonder if Palma Motors sold any brand new Nash Healeys.

    Craig
    Yes, "almost enough". A base 1954 Chevrolet sedan was $1539.
    Gary L.
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    To me it looks like the best car show ever with a variety of marques, and not just ChevroFords.
    peter lee

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Did you dad actually sell any Nash Healeys at that price?!?? Craig
    Not hardly, Craig, but thanks for the thought. They never sold any Nash Healeys or Packard Caribbeans, for that matter. In each case, the appropriate "road man" loaned them a car for display; a 1953 Caribbean to be used as Pace Car for the Edgar County Fair horse races in late July 1953, and a Nash Healey for display in the showroom as shown above.

    Of course they could have sold either or both of those cars, but that was a ton of money in a farm community.

    After they merged with Harry Rhoads to form Palma-Rhoads Motors (of which Dad and Uncle Milt owned 85%!) in 1955, they didn't sell any 1955 Studebaker Speedsters, either, although the Studebaker road man brought one around, in which I rode at age 9.

    They did sell two (2) 1956 Studebaker Golden Hawks, one of which became famous and the other of which has never been accounted for. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    Not hardly, Craig, but thanks for the thought. They never sold any Nash Healeys or Packard Caribbeans, for that matter. In each case, the appropriate "road man" loaned them a car for display; a 1953 Caribbean to be used as Pace Car for the Edgar County Fair horse races in late July 1953, and a Nash Healey for display in the showroom as shown above.

    Of course they could have sold either or both of those cars, but that was a ton of money in a farm community.

    Bob brings up an interesting point: Studebaker was active in many smaller communities that the big 3 shunned back in the 30's 40's amd

    After they merged with Harry Rhoads to form Palma-Rhoads Motors (of which Dad and Uncle Milt owned 85%!) in 1955, they didn't sell any 1955 Studebaker Speedsters, either, although the Studebaker road man brought one around, in which I rode at age 9.

    They did sell two (2) 1956 Studebaker Golden Hawks, one of which became famous and the other of which has never been accounted for. BP
    Bob brings up an interesting point: Studebaker marketed and sold cars and trucks in smaller rural areas that the big 3 shunned. What big 3 would want to place a dealership in Bisbee, AZ for example? Sure there were big dealers in the major cities that would sell the glamour, but when it came down to the brass tacks, bread and butter sold. When my parents were looking for a replacement for a tired 50 Plymouth in Phoenix, they did look at a Nash Rambler station wagon that my mother liked, but we left Stewart Motor with a 56 four door sedan. The little bit of flash was the two tone paint job Sun Glow Gold and white. When it came time for a new car in 1959 it was a Tahiti Coral deluxe 4 door Lark six. It was on the showroom floor. I remember it vividly as cars were flying in and out of the showroom floor that day. Dad traded a 1953 Cadillac 4 door that my uncle talked him into buying, but the hood was up more than down on that car.

    Bob Miles
    Last edited by 6hk71400; Yesterday at 10:35 AM. Reason: additional information

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    In BP's pic did anyone notice that Nash beat Packard to the punch by three full years to use the name "country" when naming their cars (Packard Clipper Country Sedan)? A pal of mine has a Nash Country Club Hardtop hot rod that is a pretty cool and unique ride. When he is in car shows I bet his is the only one.
    Bill

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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    Bob brings up an interesting point: Studebaker marketed and sold cars and trucks in smaller rural areas that the big 3 shunned. What big 3 would want to place a dealership in Bisbee, AZ for example?
    There was a Chevrolet dealer in Lowell, which is much smaller than Bisbee. but only about a mile or so away.

    When you google earth the town, the Star Chevrolet 'ghost sign' is visible on the building as is the neon sign. Parked across the street, is a Studebaker 2R pickup.

    There was probably a Ford dealer there too, as there's another former dealership building up the street.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WinM1895 View Post
    According to the Nash Dealer website (nashparts.com), Downing Nash was located at 486 Peachtree Street N.W. Atlanta GA and was in business 1954/56.

    So, if this info is factual, the pic couldn't have been taken in 1957.
    I don't think you're realizing that the '57 date on the photo is, most likely the date that the film was developed. It is quite possible that it was taken, during the '54 - '56 time frame, and not developed until later in '57 after the dealership was shut down. However the presence of the '56 Hawk indicates that it wasn't taken any earlier than late '55. Also, a small section of the grill, on the Strainer in back, is visible and looks to be a '54.

    Mark
    Last edited by S2Deluxe; Yesterday at 06:59 PM.


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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzard View Post
    In BP's pic did anyone notice that Nash beat Packard to the punch by three full years to use the name "country" when naming their cars (Packard Clipper Country Sedan)? A pal of mine has a Nash Country Club Hardtop hot rod that is a pretty cool and unique ride. When he is in car shows I bet his is the only one.
    Bill
    Chrysler used 'country' in a model name before the second world war when they introduced the Town & Country, and Ford started to use the term 'Country Squire' for their wood trim wagons from 1950-on. When the all-steel Ford wagon came out in 1952, they labeled the mid-range wagon a Country Sedan a few years before Packard did.

    Craig

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    Silver Hawk Member Studedude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    "No Obligation" if you'd like to see the new Nash Healey in the showroom of Palma Motors without being bothered with sales talk. Just clip the coupon and pin it to your lapel! (Click on the image to enlarge.) BP
    Love the coupon concept!

    Dave Lester

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Studedude View Post
    Love the coupon concept!
    Thanks, Dave; another of Dad's clever marketing ideas. I never asked him if anyone showed up with one of those affixed to their lapel. I doubt it.

    Palma Motors' showroom at 141 East Court Street was small; two cars were a squeeze! I don't know for sure, but I'll bet they had a smaller Nash Rambler on the floor next to the Healey, to save space.

    In this July 1953 photo (click to enlarge photos), you can see how the building was configured, with the entrance to the Service Department to the right as you looked at the building.

    dadandmiltcaribbean.jpg

    In the 1991 photo below, you can see where the Service Department entrance has been filled in with large doors. The used television sets are displayed in what was the new-car showroom; barely wide enough to get two cars in it side-by-side so the grilles would be visible through the windows.

    Both men are deceased; Uncle Milton on December 30, 1994, and Dad September 6, 2017. Dad is on the left; his younger brother Milton is on the right. In that my 1964 Daytona is an original-paint midwest car, Dad is positioned, ahem, "strategically! (The building still stands and is kind of an indoor flea market.)

    dadandmiltparis1991.jpg

    BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    Palma Motors' showroom at 141 East Court Street was small; two cars were a squeeze! I don't know for sure, but I'll bet they had a smaller Nash Rambler on the floor next to the Healey, to save space.
    Being 'farm country', was there much interest in that Nash Healey? As in, was the showroom packed 5-deep all around it to get a good look at it?

    Craig

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    In Beacon, NY and Wappingers Falls, NY, the Studebaker dealerships had two car showrooms. In between them, in Fishkill, NY, the DeSoto-Plymouth dealership added a second, connected showroom in 1952 that allowed for 16 new cars to be displayed indoors. When I sold there (Chrysler-Plymouth) in the 1990s, we did all of our new and used car deliveries from indoors (our "delivery room"). That is something that dealerships are now advertising as a new and great thing (at least in this area). There is even a Studebaker connection. After DeSoto went out in 1961, they sold new Mercedes-Benz for years (distributed by Studebaker).
    Gary L.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WinM1895 View Post
    According to the Nash Dealer website (nashparts.com), Downing Nash was located at 486 Peachtree Street N.W. Atlanta GA and was in business 1954/56.

    So, if this info is factual, the pic couldn't have been taken in 1957.

    I googled earthed the address, building is gone, replaced by a huge modern parking garage.

    There's a similar looking 3 story building kitty-corner across the street, but it's not the same as it has 6 windows, not 5.
    I grew up in Atlanta and remember Downing Motors in that location. Can't say what year they went out of business, but they did become a strictly used car dealer. In 1961 or '62 ( I was 16 or 17 ), I drug my Dad down to Downing Motors to look at two, 1953 Corvettes. Asking price on either was $700.00. He said NO, and so ended my dream of a Corvette for about 10 years.

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    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Like Studebaker, Nash had a small flathead 6-cyl which was gutless. The larger cars had a 235" OHV6 which had better performance.

    A tidbit of interest, Nash management had some guts Studebaker lacked. They partnered with Donald Healey.
    A Nash engine with dual carbs, was used in the '51-'54 Nash Healey; for sale years before the Corvette or Thunderbird. A lightweight racing Nash-Healey purpose-built for the race finished 3rd at Le Mans.



    jack vines
    See the little badge on the fender between the door and the front right wheel opening? That says Pininfarina, who built the body for the Nash Healy road cars (not sure who did the racing cars). PIninfarina being the company which built the most Ferrari Bodies at that time.

    The Nash Healys made impressive finishes at LeMans 24 hr race several years.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Being 'farm country', was there much interest in that Nash Healey? As in, was the showroom packed 5-deep all around it to get a good look at it? Craig
    Gosh, Craig; I just don't know. I was eight years old during September 1954 and would have been in school on the Thursday and Friday the Healey was displayed.

    The house in which we lived at the time was close to the school but at least a mile from the dealership. So, for whatever reason, I didn't happen to get over to the showroom when the Healey was there, so I don't know what kind of response they got to having it on display. I don't remember seeing the Healey personally, so it must've came and went [back to the zone rep] quickly.

    Most of my interest in what they sold was Packard and then, later, Studebaker. I didn't pay a lot of attention to the Nash offerings , although Dad sold a surprising number of Nashes, especially Ramblers and Metropolitans. BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; Today at 08:00 AM. Reason: grammar
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
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    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobPalma View Post
    Gosh, Craig; I just don't know. I was eight years old during September 1954 and would have been in school on the Thursday and Friday the Healey was displayed. So, for whatever reason, I didn't happen to get over to the showroom when the Healey was there, so I don't know what kind of response they got to having it on display. I don't remember seeing the Healey personally, so it must've came and went [back to the zone rep] quickly.
    Thanks, Bob.

    I guess if it had been a big enough showroom traffic-builder while you were in school, your dad would have mentioned it at the dinner table that night.

    Craig

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    President Member WinM1895's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Chrysler used 'country' in a model name before the second world war when they introduced the Town & Country, and Ford started to use the term 'Country Squire' for their wood trim wagons from 1950-on. When the all-steel Ford wagon came out in 1952, they labeled the mid-range wagon a Country Sedan a few years before Packard did.
    Country Squire introduced in 1951. 1949/51's had an all steel body (excepting the 1949 tailgate), the wood rails bolted to the body, the 'walnut' inserts were decals.

    1952/54 Mainline 'price leader' 2dr wagons were called Ranch Wagons, Country Sedan 4 door wagon introduced in 1955.

    It seems to me that 1952 Squires had wood rails, 1953 was the first year with fiberglass rails.

    Of course the 'Packard' Country Sedan is really a 'rebadged' Studebaker, Packard Motor Car Co. had nothing to do with it.

  34. #34
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    My dad bought a 1950 Champion new in 1950, then traded it in on a new 1954 Ford Country Squire wagon.
    My dad hated that Ford so much that within a few days he went back to the dealer to buy back his Champion.
    He kept driving the Champion as his work car, but used the Ford when the whole family had to go somewhere.

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