Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Flightomatic leak 2.0

  1. #1
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA.
    Posts
    19

    Flightomatic leak 2.0

    This is a follow-up to an earlier post where I described a fluid leak from the front of my Flightomatic on my ‘60 Lark 259 V-8 which still leaked after repair (no other leak sources). The situation is quite different than I first described because I have since asked the local mechanic who did the job for more details and clarification. He had removed the transmission from the bellhousing and replaced the pump shaft seal, pump to case gasket and internal pump seal. He did remove and replace the transmission case using guide studs he made. He showed me the old shaft seal, which was not in too bad shape but worn somewhat to one side. He also said there was a sign of rubbing somewhere (I was never able to understand where). Because of these two signs, he thought the torque converter might not be aligned within the bellhousing but he did not have the alignment tool J-6310, so he just reassembled the transmission case.

    The leak is about the same after repair as it was before but the mechanic is unwilling to pull the transmission again since he maintains he did all that was possible and there would be nothing for him to correct. I have read in posts on the Forum that the converter alignment tool is not really necessary and that, if you snug the flexplate to converter screws and rotate the engine a couple of times, it will self-align and then the screws can be tightened.

    My questions:

    1. If the converter is misaligned in the bell housing, could this possibly cause the leak?
    2. With the transmission fully assembled, can the alignment procedure above be performed or must the transmission case be removed first?

    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,216
    Blog Entries
    36
    The transmission must be removed to use the converter-to-bellhousing alignment tool. Basically, you loosely bolt the torque converter to the flexplate, install the bellhousing, and bolt the alignment tool in place on the end of the bellhousing. The tool aligns the converter correctly, so you then tighten the converter to flexplate bolts.

    Question: are your engine-to-bellhousing locating pins in place, and engaging into the bellhousing?
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  3. #3
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA.
    Posts
    19
    I am really asking if I can use the procedure which doesn't require the tool i.e. snugging the bolts and turning the engine two turns, then tightening the bolts without removing the transmission case. Regarding engine to bellhousing locating pins, I don't know since the bell housing was not removed.

  4. #4
    President Member Dwain G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Puget Sound, , USA.
    Posts
    4,166
    You can definitely use that procedure without an alignment tool, it's been done many times, but you can also rent the tool from Jon Myer at a reasonable price. That would be the best way.
    Another thought on the oil leak. Make sure the converter drain plug is tight and the threads are sealed.

  5. #5
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA.
    Posts
    19
    The remaining question is: Can I use the procedure without the alignment tool while the transmission case is still bolted to the bellhousing. To use the tool, the case would need to be removed, which the mechanic will not repeat.

  6. #6
    Silver Hawk Member bezhawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    here, sometimes somewhere else
    Posts
    5,680
    Was the front pump bushing replaced (behind the seal) ? Was the torque converter drive hub grooved? You may not stop the leak if these things are not addressed.

  7. #7
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA.
    Posts
    19
    No, the bushing was not replaced (my ignorance for not buying and providing to mechanic). Don't know if the converter drive hub was grooved.


    Mechanic will not pull the transmission off again, so my only hope is to address the possible misalignment of the torque converter in the bellhousing if the method without the tool (snug flexplate to converter bolts and turn engine over twice, then tighten the bolts) can work with the transmission case installed. I'm hoping someone knows if this is possible or advisable. Thanks to everyone for the help.

  8. #8
    President Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Marysville, Washington, USA.
    Posts
    551
    As Brad states if either of those items were worn and the " mechanic " ignored them either out of ignorance or being in too big a hurry, get it done period. Obvoiusly he doesn't want to warantee his work. I would find a club member in your area that has had work done sucessfully and get a referral from him. Lou Cote

  9. #9
    Champion Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA.
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for all the input everyone. I understand there are a lot of things that possibly could or should have been done but, because I do not plan to spend more good money after bad, going to another mechanic is not planned. I don't want to bore everyone with explaining how my situation developed. At this point, I can only ask the mechanic to try things which don't require removing the transmission again. The main one is trying to align the torque converter within the bell housing if that is possible now.


    Could someone, please, please, please tell me if the method of aligning the torque converter without the aligning tool (loosening flexplate to converter bolts to snug, turning engine over twice and then tightening bolts) and is feasible with the transmission fully installed?

  10. #10
    President Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    1,481
    Problem is you may have already ruined the new seal....

  11. #11
    President Member E. Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA.
    Posts
    704
    Good grief...the guy has asked a simple question numerous times. Isn't there someone on this forum that can give him a simple yes or no answer without getting off into some opinion of their own unrelated to his original question.

  12. #12
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Parkton, MD
    Posts
    146
    YES, loosen the bolts, turn it over, and tighten the bolts. That will align it very nicely.

  13. #13
    President Member E. Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA.
    Posts
    704
    Thank you Ross. See, that wasn't hard at all.

  14. #14
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ferndale, WA, USA.
    Posts
    28,281
    Since the "Mechanic" said the Seal was worn unevenly, if centering the Converter in the Housing fails, which unfortunately I think it will, because the allowable movement is SO slight I do't see that being the cause, I hope I am wrong because I hate to say that the "Other" fix is a LOT of work or expense.

    The Shop Manual will detail how to align a Converter Housing to a replacement Engine Block re-drilling the Dowel Pin Holes after Dialing-in the Clutch Housing to within .006 of the dead centerline of the Crankshaft.

    This Must be measured and or re-positioned whenever an Engine vs Clutch or Converter Housing combination is changed/replaced. Since you know no history of the Car, it should be checked IF the problem continues.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •