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Thread: GPS

  1. #1
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    GPS

    I have a need for a decent GPS to follow a somewhat complicated route, all on public roads. This is essentially a one-time need, so looking for an inexpensive one which is reliable. Simplicity would be a good thing.

    What do you guys know?

  2. #2
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    jnormanth;
    I have yet to find one that can be per programed to follow a given route. Trying to follow road signs inside a city is almost impossible. If anyone knows of one I would love to know of its make and model.
    I have a few years old Garman Nuvi; nothing special. It will warn you of traffic delays on interstate roads after you are stopped in traffic; with no way out. Other times their alternate route is worse then the one you are on. Still it is a life saver when one is lost inside a city.
    Ron

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    As an alternative, you could use Google Maps on a smart phone or print it out from the internet.

    If those are not alternatives, I much prefer Garmin products. Their updates are usually quite current and my guess is that the maps are common to all price ranges of their products. Screen size and features are probably the difference. My guess is their website would let you see the features you want and then just price shop.

    Bob
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    President Member garyash's Avatar
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    You might be able to use a smartphone and Google maps. Here’s the trick:

    In Google maps on a PC or Mac, not your phone or iPad, put in the start and end points and let Maps calculate some route. If Google maps shows you several alternate routes, select one and drag it to the one that is closest to what you want. This makes the alternates disappear. Then, click and drag on the path to adjust it to the route you want. Zoom as needed. Of course, Google is sure that it is smarter than you, so it may wind up with loops and you have to start again, but you can do it with a few tries. Sometimes you need to drag one of the white dots, sometimes between the dots. You can only have a typed in start and end, no added destinations. Zoom the screen to get the entire route without too much extra.

    Once it shows the route you like, click on the button that says “Send directions to your phone”. It will send a short URL to your phone or email that will recreate the map whenever you want it. Also, you can click on the Menu button (3 horizontal bars, top left corner) and select “share or embed map”. That will show you the URL link which you can copy and save.

    When you are ready to navigate the route, you can open your email or saved link, click on it, the Google map will appear on your phone or iPad. Here’s the route from my house to the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend:
    https://goo.gl/maps/Ux1igT3obPp

    Edit: If you have a complicated route, it might be helpful to break it into multiple pieces.
    Last edited by garyash; 07-02-2018 at 05:06 PM.
    Gary Ash
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    Use an app on your cell, gives you verbal turn by turn directions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim333 View Post
    Use an app on your cell, gives you verbal turn by turn directions.
    Except that I'm a dinosaur. I don't own a gps or cell phone.

    Ah well, I have a paper road atlas.

  7. #7
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    I'm glad that there is at least one more dinosaur besides me.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post
    Except that I'm a dinosaur. I don't own a gps or cell phone.
    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post

    Ah well, I have a paper road atlas.


    Quote Originally Posted by RadioRoy View Post
    I'm glad that there is at least one more dinosaur besides me.
    I thought I as a throwback because I used an ancient Garmin GPS+ (triangular in shape) run to a laptop (also ancient) over a 9 pin serial cable.

    Frankly unless you have a "talking" ("turn left at Main St. in 100 feet."
    ) device or an assisting person to interrupt the navigation (hint: not advisable to use your wife) it is very distractive to "read" a GPS on a small screen as you drive. My CAGO (Cheap A$$ Garmin Owner) solution was to buy them used at Thrift Stores. I have three Nuvi's. I paid all of $1.99, $4.99 and $12.99 for them. Two work properly but the batteries needed to be replaced (about $7-$8 each off Ebay). Also if your going into "new" areas the maps are often out of date. For me that is of little importance. All the screens function in that they light up. But the major problem I've had is the touch screen function fails. That said I’ve seen Garmin Nuvi’s on Craigslist in the $30 range and you can test it (run the touch screen functions for sure) before purchase. If they say, “It just needs a new battery” I’d walk.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    President Member garyash's Avatar
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    OK, no GPS and no cell phone...

    Try a Rand McNally Large Scale Road Atlas with spiral binding, about $15-$18, so you can open it and place it on the seat beside you. Note, however, that reading the map while driving is at least as bad as texting on a cell phone.

    Norman, you must have some friend or relative that will pass along an older smart phone. Yes, you will have to pay monthly fees, but you’ll gain a lot! You could even post pictures of your trip here.
    Gary Ash
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyash View Post
    OK, no GPS and no cell phone...

    Try a Rand McNally Large Scale Road Atlas with spiral binding, about $15-$18, so you can open it and place it on the seat beside you. Note, however, that reading the map while driving is at least as bad as texting on a cell phone.

    Norman, you must have some friend or relative that will pass along an older smart phone. Yes, you will have to pay monthly fees, but you’ll gain a lot! You could even post pictures of your trip here.
    There won't be anything interesting enough to post pictures of. Our daughter offered to let us use her Lexus but we declined. We'd rather drive the ancient (1996) Caddy since it is more comfortable and will run nearly 500 miles on a tank of fuel, and it will keep up with the crazies who want to cruise at near 100 mph down I-95. What I finally decided is that I'll just study the maps and make a cheat sheet on 5" x 7" cards.

    However I did beak down and buy a cheapo "burner" cell phone, just in case.

    But you mention cell phone pictures. Interesting, since we were just talking about that today. Eeeevreybody is making cell phone pics by the hundreds and thousands.

    We have lots of old photos, many made during the teens and twenties when you hired an actual "photographer", and even a dozen old family daguerreotypes from 1870 or thereabouts, and shoeboxes of slides I shot during the seventies. They have survived because they are physical. How many, if any, of the billions of electronic photos being made today will be around a hundred years form now? .0000001%? Will your great grandchildren ever see a picture of you made today? Probably not. The cell phone will have hit the trash, and nobody will know the site, username and password to access some electronic storage.

  11. #11
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    The best thing I ever did with a Garmin was to put it under my right front tire and drive away...
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post

    We have lots of old photos, many made during the teens and twenties when you hired an actual "photographer", and even a dozen old family daguerreotypes from 1870 or thereabouts, and shoeboxes of slides I shot during the seventies. They have survived because they are physical. How many, if any, of the billions of electronic photos being made today will be around a hundred years form now? .0000001%? Will your great grandchildren ever see a picture of you made today? Probably not. The cell phone will have hit the trash, and nobody will know the site, username and password to access some electronic storage.
    Yes, the device to display these "data" based "memories" is something that gets forgotten. I recall reading years ago that NASA wanted some data read from the Apollo era. They had the tapes, but apparently they had long ago disposed of the machine to play them on. I'm not sure how that got resolved. In my field (TV Production) there are companies that keep ancient devices alive (like 2" Quad machines) and get paid well for it.

    Hardware and access aside, WHO HAS TIME TO GO BACK AND LOOK AT ALL THESE IMAGES??? It will get to the point in a few generations where a lifetime won't be long enough to access the past much less create your own. Then again I have a daughter that has at least 10,000 pictures of her first Guinea Pig. So, I guess I'm biased.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Yes, the device to display these "data" based "memories" is something that gets forgotten. I recall reading years ago that NASA wanted some data read from the Apollo era. They had the tapes, but apparently they had long ago disposed of the machine to play them on. I'm not sure how that got resolved. In my field (TV Production) there are companies that keep ancient devices alive (like 2" Quad machines) and get paid well for it.
    I remember reading (may have the details wrong) that the Census Bureau needed to rerun some of the data from the 1930 Census, which were stored on IBM punch cards, and had no reader for the format used on those cards. They ended up borrowing a punch card reader from the Smithsonian Institution and sent it off to IBM, which refurbished it for free (they still had the blueprints and instruction manuals). It's now back in the Smithsonian, ready for use again if needed.

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    I remember reading (may have the details wrong) that the Census Bureau needed to rerun some of the data from the 1930 Census, which were stored on IBM punch cards, and had no reader for the format used on those cards. They ended up borrowing a punch card reader from the Smithsonian Institution and sent it off to IBM, which refurbished it for free (they still had the blueprints and instruction manuals). It's now back in the Smithsonian, ready for use again if needed.
    I wish the SMN would find an old microfilm printer from a Public Library that may have one stashed away and use it to print Production Orders from 1959 & earlier. There are issues with the typewritten copies with errors and handwritten notes which are not usually transcripted.

    Craig

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    I use a program called "WAZE" on my iPhone.
    It even gives you alternate routes when there is a crash ahead.
    It tells you the fastest route to your destination .
    https://www.waze.com
    It also warns you about speed traps

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    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    Just go to a Sinclair station and get a free paper map..
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


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    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    Just go to a Sinclair station and get a free paper map..
    How many years ago was that!!?!!

    I haven't seen a FREE roadmap at a gas station for over 40 years!

    Craig

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    Just take a grandkid. They likely have the cellphone - and know how to use it.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    I remember reading (may have the details wrong) that the Census Bureau needed to rerun some of the data from the 1930 Census, which were stored on IBM punch cards, and had no reader for the format used on those cards. They ended up borrowing a punch card reader from the Smithsonian Institution and sent it off to IBM, which refurbished it for free (they still had the blueprints and instruction manuals). It's now back in the Smithsonian, ready for use again if needed.
    It doesn't seem that long ago . In the 1960s-early 1970s, I was using punch cards and a reader to analyze experiments at IBM.
    Gary L.
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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    It doesn't seem that long ago . In the 1960s-early 1970s, I was using punch cards and a reader to analyze experiments at IBM.
    Yes, me too. My office employed a woman who spent 8 hours every day entering data onto punch cards so that they could be analyzed on the room-sized IBM computers of the day. At the time, that was considered to be a good job for those without a college degree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    It doesn't seem that long ago . In the 1960s-early 1970s, I was using punch cards and a reader to analyze experiments at IBM.
    Yup!! Learned to program in Fortran IV on those IBM beauties. Punch cards and tape both. Bob
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    I wish there were this many responses when someone asks a technical question.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim333 View Post
    I wish there were this many responses when someone asks a technical question.
    You don't need a lot of responses to a technical question. You just need one correct answer.
    Gary L.
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  24. #24
    President Member Jerry Forrester's Avatar
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    Gary, there's almost always one correct answer to every tech question posted on this forum. The problem is, finding it when it's hidden in amongst the 50 or so INCORRECT answers.
    Jerry Forrester
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
    Gary, there's almost always one correct answer to every tech question posted on this forum. The problem is, finding it when it's hidden in amongst the 50 or so INCORRECT answers.
    Jerry nails it. LOL!!!

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