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Thread: Removing Rusted Nuts With a Candle

  1. #1
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    Removing Rusted Nuts With a Candle

    Cheers,
    JOE

    --------------------------------------------------

    "After all is said and done, a hell of a lot more is said than done"
    Clark Olmstead

  2. #2
    Speedster Member
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    Im pretty sure it has something to do with the wax getting into the cracks and crevices to help lubricate.

  3. #3
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    An engine builder in our Model A club reports good success using the wax method. Heat the head stud red hot, then let it cool until the wax just melts when he lays it on the sides of the studs. Let it cool, then try to remove the studs. I haven't tried it yet, but will give it a try the next time I need to remove head studs.

  4. #4
    President Member Colgate Studebaker's Avatar
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    Jim Pepper has tried this and has reported it really does work just as the guy demonstrated. If there is anybody you can believe is telling you the truth it is Jim. keep this in mind and try it the next time you have a stubborn nut that wont break loose. Bill

  5. #5
    President Member Kurt's Avatar
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    This absolutely works. I tried it on a 3406 CAT diesel that had broken exhaust studs. I also used the method to get broken bolts out of a Farmall tractor I restored.
    1962 Champ

    51 Commander 4 door

  6. #6
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    Didn't work for me. The stud snapped before the nut ever came loose. And I heated and applied the candle a good number of times.

    I'm not the type of guy to spray a penetrant, count to five and wonder why it didn't work. I've had situations (numerous) where I used every "get it loose" product known to man including the much spoken of PB Blaster, acetone and ATF etc.. I've liberally applied it up to 5 times a day for a week, heat, no heat. NOTHING worked. In one instance (a steering rack nut on a not too old car) I had to carefully cut the nut off on parallel sides. It still took a bit of fine chiseling and one small section where it pulled the threads off the rack because the rust bond was stronger than the rack thread! And the metal of the rack was far superior to the metal of the frozen nut. BTW, under the nut, regardless of 25 liberal doses of penetrant over the course of a week, it was bone dry. I’m glad these methods work for some, but 80% of the time they don’t work for me.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWChamp View Post
    An engine builder in our Model A club reports good success using the wax method. Heat the head stud red hot, then let it cool until the wax just melts when he lays it on the sides of the studs. Let it cool, then try to remove the studs. I haven't tried it yet, but will give it a try the next time I need to remove head studs.
    In my experience red hot makes the bolt stud expand and crushes the rust that has set up house keeping in all the interstitials . It works exceedingly well.
    It requires MAPP gas at a bare minimum. Oxy acetyelene is vastly superior. Garden variety propane doesn't stand a chance

  8. #8
    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
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    It works. Used it to remove the water side block plug on a 460 Ford. Guy's brother said good thing I kept my mouth shut. Was going to say if this guffy idea works I'am buying lunch. Told him he was still buying lunch

  9. #9
    Speedster Member Santosh's Avatar
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    It works, the heat expands the inner diameter of the bolt by the factor (1 + alpha) * delta T (alpha = extension coefficient) . And a little diffence in the diameter is an immense effort.
    Walter

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  10. #10
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    It will even work on some exhaust manifold studs. i drop an old deep well socket over the stud and heat the manifold.wax comes next. Luck Doofus

  11. #11
    Silver Hawk Member 53k's Avatar
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    My mechanic son has used that trick many times with success. He has showed me, but somehow I always forget about it when I'm fighting a stuck bolt or nut.

    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

  12. #12
    Champion Member JimKB1MCV's Avatar
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    Much used around ships and boats or any maritime application. Like every other tool in your toolbox, there are times when it won't do the job at hand but usually the wax (I was taught beeswax was preferred) will help start a stubborn nut or stud. Heat is usually your friend here, seems to aid the wax penetration. The trick sometimes is how much an where its used.
    An old Chief Engineer showed me the beeswax trick in the early 1960s.
    When I was the Old Chief in the 1990s a young !st Engineer showed me the trick. I was content to let him think he invented it.

  13. #13
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    For a cheap source of beeswax, just go to Menards and buy a toilet setting ring for less than $2.
    It also works good for door latches and cam lock car top carriers to lubricate the aluminum levers you flip over.

  14. #14
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    With a LIGHTER !!!!!
    No way.
    The wax works but requires more and longer application of heat.
    South Lompoc Studebaker

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santosh View Post
    It works, the heat expands the inner diameter of the bolt by the factor (1 + alpha) * delta T (alpha = extension coefficient) . And a little diffence in the diameter is an immense effort.
    Well, now that the "math" is explained it all seems so simple. LOL

    For those who remember the character Jeff Spicolli in the movie "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," maybe better said is: "So, like this humongous gnarly fireball puffs up the bolt and pulverizes the rust - pronto."
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 56 PREZ 4D View Post
    With a LIGHTER !!!!!
    No way.
    The wax works but requires more and longer application of heat.
    I have used the wax trick and it takes several applications over several days.
    A guy that size should have been able to remove those nuts with out said demonstration. I would say most members on this forum have used the wax treatment this is nothing new.

  17. #17
    Chief Cat Herder showbizkid's Avatar
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    I'd like to try that on the a-pillar door hinge screws... if I could get the frickin' candle back there
    Clark in San Diego
    '63 Standard (F2) "Barney"
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

  18. #18
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    An old blacksmith (well actually he is a young blacksmith) shared that if heat doesn't do it then you need lubrication I use heat from an acetylene torch to convince things to come apart, haven't had much luck with a candle. I have a friend that builds custom cars and he starts with throwaway junk and I guess he uses lard after he heats the offending fastener. I like the "rattle gun" because it vibrates and it's easier than pulling on a breaker bar.

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