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Thread: "Promises to be a Solid Investment?"

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    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    "Promises to be a Solid Investment?"

    An unusually nice one of these, to be sure, but if $29,500 for a 273 without air conditioning "Promises to be a Solid Investment," the investor would likely be a good candidate for a couple Brooklyn Bridges...

    Geeze:

    https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1100618/1967-plymouth-belvedere-2-for-sale-in-sudbury-ontario-p3n-1l1


    (Hmmmm...come to think of it, the claim isn't made that it would be a good investment! ) BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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    Bob,
    But it does have the highly sought after "BP Battery Hold down"!
    Personally I never thought these models were that highly sought after, but what do I know? It is a lovely example however.
    Bill

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    Hummmmm, so 10-20 years down the road some Gen X, Gen Y, Millennial will be chomping at the bit to pay $60,000+ for a smog belching, gas hogging, rolling pile if steel. I'm thinking – NO. They will likely be paying big bucks for first generation I-Phones, X-Boxes etc. so they too can relive their childhood. The day is not too far off when the bottom will drop out of the collector car market. The Silent Generation and the Baby Boomers will die off and the then current generation will have as much interest in cars as this I-Phone generation has in Ham Radio.

    $29,500 seems like a lot to compensate for one's adolescent disappointment.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    Looking at the Plymouth reminds me a little of my '55 Belvedere cnvt w/OD, elec. seat, and elec. windows. Red with black side panels and black top. My first V8! It was great fun.

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    Looking at the Plymouth reminds me a little of my '55 Belvedere cnvt w/OD, elec. seat, and elec. windows. Red with black side panels and black top. My first V8! It was great fun. If I saw one like it for sale I would have a weak moment!

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    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Some posts cause my thoughts to wander. This one led me to look up the word investment. Not that I didn't think I knew what it meant, but because I began to wonder if I really had a true grasp of the word. Well...there's good and not so good investments. Therefore, I conclude that with the car that is the subject of this thread, it is quite possible it can be a "solid" investment. Most likely, if the seller gets his asking price, a "solid" investment for him. Of course, not knowing his investment in money, time, etc...it could turn out to be a lousy investment.

    For me, the time to type this comment, already enough investment.
    John Clary
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    President Member tsenecal's Avatar
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    "The day is not too far off when the bottom will drop out of the collector car market." I agree with wittsend, I think that there will always be a few, that appreciate classic cars, but most will have moved on to the latest, greatest, self driving, maybe even flying, mode of transportation.

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    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    Very nice car, but it's not a performance model. This is the kind of car I would have settled for when I was younger. My first three cars weren't even V-8s.


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    Speedster Member avanti-hawk's Avatar
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    Even in Canadian dollars thats still too much for a 67 square "B" body with a 273. Nice enough car, but $10k too much at least.

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    President Member t walgamuth's Avatar
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    seems a lot.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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    Golden Hawk Member
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    I owned two Valiants with 273 V8s. That engine was good in that size car. My sister had an intermediate (B-body) Dodge with the 273 V8. I believe that the engine was inadequate for that car.
    Gary L.
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  12. #12
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    I owned two Valiants with 273 V8s. That engine was good in that size car. My sister had an intermediate (B-body) Dodge with the 273 V8. I believe that the engine was inadequate for that car.
    Gary, you make some interesting points. I have had many cars with very different engines. One of the most impressive (to me) was an International Travelall with the 401ci V8 engine. Horrible gas mileage, but surprising raw power. In discussing "adequate" vs "inadequate," are we really considering the vehicle, or "driver expectations?" I believe mostly it is the expectations/attitude of the driver. In my youth, I wanted power and speed. Now that I'm older, I value dependability, economy, and safety more than speed and G-force acceleration.

    Also, when discussing what's "adequate," we must consider geography. Those living in relatively flat plains areas, or coastal regions (flatlanders) can get by with less acceleration and power than folks living in the mountains, or folks who do a lot of traveling to areas with challenging geography. In my opinion, there have been some vehicles that deserve the inadequate engine description regardless of any other circumstances. Two that I owned come to mind. One was a four-cylinder Pinto station wagon and the other was a 1983 6 cyl Buick Regal. It is one thing for a car to chug around a residential community between home and the grocery store. But when a vehicle is too anemic to safely accelerate & merge into traffic on the interstate...that's inadequate!
    John Clary
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    Yikes and I've seen B Body station wagons with slant six power!

    Regarding the Pinto wagon being underpowered..., I installed the 4 cylinder, T-Bird, Turbo Coupe (190 HP) engine in my Pinto wagon. Merging into interstate traffic is no-longer-a-problem.

    Can't seem to get pictures to post, but this links to the album. Images 3,4,6,7. https://www.flickr.com/photos/243418...h/13338653794/

    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    President Member Jerry Forrester's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Yikes and I've seen B Body station wagons with slant six power!

    Regarding the Pinto wagon being underpowered..., I installed the 4 cylinder, T-Bird, Turbo Coupe (190 HP) engine in my Pinto wagon. Merging into interstate traffic is no-longer-a-problem.

    Can't seem to get pictures to post, but this links to the album. Images 3,4,6,7. https://www.flickr.com/photos/243418...h/13338653794/

    You can't post pictures direct from your computer to the Stove Huggers Forum. You have to us a photo hosting site.
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    I would probably be the guy who would step up to this silly price on such a car if I had unlimited resources. The first car my Dad and I bought together was a Candy Apple Red 67 Belvedere II Silver Streak Special 2HT with the 383 4BBL, black top with Silver Streaks in it. No, this isn't an exact match, and with the 273, it isn't even close performace wise. But, that car is likely the closest I'd ever come to my Dad's car. I'd post the picture of my brother and I behind it my first day of Kindergarten in 1968 if I hadn't dumped Photobucket. Never underestimate the power of the emotional attraction. This car has it for me.

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    Chief Cat Herder showbizkid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Hummmmm, so 10-20 years down the road some Gen X, Gen Y, Millennial will be chomping at the bit to pay $60,000+ for a smog belching, gas hogging, rolling pile if steel. I'm thinking – NO. They will likely be paying big bucks for first generation I-Phones, X-Boxes etc. so they too can relive their childhood. The day is not too far off when the bottom will drop out of the collector car market. The Silent Generation and the Baby Boomers will die off and the then current generation will have as much interest in cars as this I-Phone generation has in Ham Radio.
    I'm not sure I agree completely with your sentiment, but it is true that guys in their 30s are now collecting first-generation video game platforms and cartridges, and have been for a few years. Have you seen the price for a working, mint Intellivision system lately?

    But I don't think that all interest in old cars is going to instantly evaporate one day.
    Clark in San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    [FONT=Verdana][COLOR=#222222]Hummmmm, so 10-20 years down the road some Gen X, Gen Y, Millennial will be chomping at the bit to pay $60,000+ for a smog belching, gas hogging, rolling pile if steel. I'm thinking – NO. They will likely be paying big bucks for first generation I-Phones,
    I disagree. Folks whose parents weren't even born at the time are willing to pay big bucks for ancient cars. Try to buy any of the 1930s high dollar cars in fully restored condition. They'll cost more than most houses.

    And stuff being cool just because it's old? Nah. I threw an old Marantz amp in the trash along with an IBM Selectric and a stand-alone-fax machine. And I've got at least 35# of Pentax camera gear and Fuji slide film that was all the rage when Simon and Garfunkel were singing "Kodachrome". Now it isn't a decent boat anchor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by showbizkid View Post
    But I don't think that all interest in old cars is going to instantly evaporate one day.
    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post
    I disagree. Folks whose parents weren't even born at the time are willing to pay big bucks for ancient cars. Try to buy any of the 1930s high dollar cars in fully restored condition. They'll cost more than most houses.
    I think my point is being misunderstood. I'm not saying every car will be like the 1929 stock market crash. BUT, it is well noted that the millennial generation has not nearly the interest in cars their fathers and grandfathers had. There will be a glut of cars (they will inherit) and prices will fall. And many a millennial will sell their fathers and grandfathers past to spend on items of their own (millennial) past.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    President Member junior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post
    And stuff being cool just because it's old? Nah. I threw an old Marantz amp in the trash...
    I don't know about the amps, but in this part of the world original marantz receivers go for good $. cheers, junior

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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    ...($$$$$$$$) seems like a lot to compensate for one's adolescent disappointment.
    This is the essences of what drives current auction prices for muscle cars. Well stated!

    Steve

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