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Thread: Simple projects take longest

  1. #1
    President Member tomnoller's Avatar
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    Simple projects take longest

    It's been my experience the "easiest" projects with my cars wind up taking the longest, in most cases.

    Yesterday my plan was to install lap belts in my '59. Eight bolts thru the floor - big deal, right?
    Took me hours.

    Scorching hot in a garage and the best tool in my collection - an American made old Vice Grip - kept spinning so had to have my trusty spouse come out and hold a wrench.

    From now on, every project I undertake will be classified BIG. :-)

  2. #2
    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    But doesn't it feel good to have it done.


    "In the heart of Arkansas."
    Searcy, Arkansas
    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.

  3. #3
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    "There are no small jobs." That's what my grandfather (a plumber by trade) used to say.

  4. #4
    President Member Michidan's Avatar
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    So true. What about putting new bumper guards on a bumper... 5 minutes? Nope.
    The bolts are swedged in and a part of the bumper guard. At some point they had been rechromed. The freakin threads were too fat, no nut in the whole shop would go on!
    I think I was about 2 hours solving that.

  5. #5
    President Member 48skyliner's Avatar
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    I always think in terms of

    A - figuring out how to do the project. This may take 90% of the time:

    1. what materials to use, can it be done with the materials and hardware we already have. Bolt it, rivet it, weld it, bond it?

    2. which option will be strongest, most reliable, look "factory" when completed. Sometimes the best option requires more than one person.

    3. time spent fitting parts in place, taking measurements, drinking coffee, getting other opinions

    4. fabricate the part, or order it from Classic Enterprises? do my best backyard hack job or wait for my machinist to do it right?


    B. - Doing the actual work - often a small part of the project.

    Of course, if you are talking about body work, finishing and painting, almost all of the time is actually doing the work. To paraphrase a famous quote - "I love the smell of Bondo in the morning", but not for several weeks at a time.
    Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
    See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

  6. #6
    President Member j.byrd's Avatar
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    tomnoller, my father in law gave me some advice about 40 years ago that I still find to be true. "Take every tool you own to every job and go ahead and empty them where you're working, you're gona' need them all anyway, no matter how small or simple the job", ha !

  7. #7
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomnoller View Post
    It's been my experience the "easiest" projects with my cars wind up taking the longest, in most cases.

    Yesterday my plan was to install lap belts in my '59. Eight bolts thru the floor - big deal, right?
    Took me hours.

    Scorching hot in a garage and the best tool in my collection - an American made old Vice Grip - kept spinning so had to have my trusty spouse come out and hold a wrench.

    From now on, every project I undertake will be classified BIG. :-)
    True to our STUDEBAKER PERSONALITIES...I agree and disagree with you. Like many things we encounter, I find that it has more to do with my attitude, planning, and organization skills (or lack thereof) that causes my "imagined" tasks to run up against the "wall" of reality.

    Many times, I have to deal with "where did I leave that tool" after being called away in the middle of some project to take care of a problem other folks thought only I could solve??? And then, having other circumstances cause me not to get back to a particular task for days...little wonder that confusion demons sneak in and cause havoc.

    In my case, I make a mistake of "expecting" the job to be simple. The reality is that my expectations are not in based in reality. My unrealistic expectations are that the tools will be where they are supposed to be and that there will be no interruptions once I begin...which is never the case.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
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    SDC member since 1975

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclary View Post
    In my case, I make a mistake of "expecting" the job to be simple. The reality is that my expectations are not in based in reality. My unrealistic expectations are that the tools will be where they are supposed to be and that there will be no interruptions once I begin...which is never the case.
    My grandfather ALWAYS put a tool back in its place immediately after using it. He would say "Put it back where you got it as soon as you are done with it; that way, you won't waste 2/3rds of your time looking for it when you need to use it again!"

    He was obviously right!!

    On the other hand, your Camry experience didn't have anything to do with misplaced tools: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ighlight=CAMRY

    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 05-25-2018 at 07:28 AM.

  9. #9
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    My grandfather ALWAYS put a tool back in its place immediately after using it. He would say "Put it back where you got it as soon as you are done with it; that way, you won't waste 2/3rds of your time looking for it when you need to use it again!"

    He was obviously right!!

    On the other hand, your Camry experience didn't have anything to do with misplaced tools: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ighlight=CAMRY

    Craig
    I plead guilty to all...and the evidence is undisputable. Fact is, for hand tools, my father and grandfather(s) lived their entire lives, raised large families, with no more hand tools that could be carried in one box, in one hand. Now, I have their old tool boxes, tools, and a couple of roll-around multiple tier tool cabinets. I believe that one good use of my time while searching for my misplaced "stuff"...would be to count my blessings (better than complaining).
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

  10. #10
    President Member Jeff_H's Avatar
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    It always seems that I start a simple project some distance from the garage or tools that should not require more than a pliers and a screwdriver in my back pocket....

    then:

    10+ trips back to the garage/tool chest later I have 1/2 of everything I own (it seems) at the job site.

    The last trip ends up being to fetch a wheelbarrow to haul it all back when I am finally done!

    Jeff in ND

  11. #11
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    "My names Tom, and I'm a Repairaholic." What..., you mean I'm not the ONLY ONE?

    A prior trip to Cars & Coffee the tail pipe hanger was bad and rattled embarassingly. Surely 10 minutes would fix it as I have numerouse spare hangers..., somewhere. Some two hours later (and not even a trip to the store) I fixed the problem with scrap rubber because those numerous spare hangers..., I gave up looking for them after an hour. The rest of the time was spent re-engineering a simple hanger with old parts. I never know if I should be greatful that I'm gifted in "McGiver-ing" something out of nothing..., or cursed because in doing so I whittle away large portions of my life with some regret.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  12. #12
    Speedster Member GTHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j.byrd View Post
    tomnoller, my father in law gave me some advice about 40 years ago that I still find to be true. "Take every tool you own to every job and go ahead and empty them where you're working, you're gona' need them all anyway, no matter how small or simple the job", ha !
    Reminds me of my Dad, long gone, As a farm machinery mechanic he would dump his whole tool box on the ground and then it was my job to pick them all up.
    don

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