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Thread: cost floor pan

  1. #1
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    cost floor pan

    I have a price of 4 to 5 thousand dollars to replace the right and left half front floor pan and replacing trunk floor. Does that price seems high.

    That a six hour drive to get their from Huntsville Al. I'm still looking for a shop. Does the body have to be on the car (54 Champion couple) to replace those parts.
    Barry

  2. #2
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    The panels from Classic enterprises are about $800 total. That leaves about $3-4 K for labor. I have no idea what a good shop charges but IIWY, I'd pm bezhawk on the forum and see what he would charge you to do them.

    Why Brad, well he knows Studebakers and Avanti. His work is well known as top grade and he's a forum member. It will be done right and you will be sure your money is well spent.

    I think he's around St. Louis but start a conversation with him to be sure you are on the right track.

    His website http://bezautoalchemy.com/

    The floors can be installed on or off the frame. I did my 54K floors, rockers and frame boxes on a rotisserie.

    Bob
    , ,

  3. #3
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    That price is labor only, I supply parts.

  4. #4
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    I agree, call Brad for an honest appraisal, and especially before committing with the shop you mentioned.

  5. #5
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    Yep call Brad. I've seen shop prices that are CRAZY.
    Personal Question: How is your health? If you are healthy enough and "handy enough" to tackle the job, why not get some pointers and advice and just get after it?
    Sounds a little crazy, but every time I get a price these days, I find it much cheaper to buy the tools I need, get a load of "Knowledge" and do it myself.
    Takes quite A bit longer, but 3-4K for a floor pan replacement? "F" That!

  6. #6
    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
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    How much of the floor needs work? Just the fronts from the seats to the firewall or do you need under the rear seat as well? A lot of the cost is removing and reinstalling the seats,carpet, etc. If the rockers are good and the door posts and the only part that needs work is the two side floors I would think you could get it done for $1500-2000 in labor if you pull and reinstall all the trim.

  7. #7
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    Remember he said trunk floor replacement also.
    , ,

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    I'm now 73 years old. I have been interested in old cars since I was a kid. However, I was in my early 40's before I purchased a vintage car that needed extensive bodywork. By that time I had abandoned my college inspired idealism (vocational rehabilitation) career for one that provided a realistic income to meet the demands of providing for a family, paying a mortgage, etc. (Industrial Sales/engineering & consulting). I think my talent for mechanics, processes, and an intense curiosity regarding the application of tools came from growing up poor. Many of the things acquired in my youth were broken discards of others, and either had to be fixed to use or re-engineered to meet our needs.

    Somehow, I developed the attitude that working through mechanical challenges is as rewarding (enjoyable) as merely purchasing an item. Therefore, when my income allowed me to "play," I bought stuff cheap enough to risk my "skill learning curve." Therefore, if I failed, the economic consequences would be considered the "cost of entertainment." Since I was selling much of the types of tooling used in auto work, I included some auto body shops in my customer base. It didn't take long to realize I could do many of the tasks I saw being done. In fact, I knew I could do some of them even better than what I observed. I began buying/scrounging, and picking up tools when the opportunity came along. I'm in no way an expert, nor do I consider myself a "go to person" on such matters. However, I have won trophies with every vehicle I have rescued.

    If I had not done most of the work myself, I probably wouldn't have had but one vintage vehicle. Two things...I really enjoy the challenges of doing the work, and probably couldn't have afforded to pay others to do it for me. OH...and a third thing...since my family does not share my passion for such things, paying others a fair price to do the work, would probably involve depriving them of money for their interests, and that wouldn't be fair.

    You can't look at a commercial shop's quote in a vacuum. Unlike an individual hobbyist, they are under time constraints, dealing with "overhead," and obligations beyond the expectations of casual observers. From my experience, the figure you gave is not out of line, even if it exceeds other investments you have already made in the car. If you are unsure, visit other shops and get more estimates. While there, take a look around. Ask for a tour. Observe the shop, work being done, and what work is languishing awaiting work. Often, that is very telling about how yours will be treated.

    I didn't write this to condemn anyone who pays others to do their work, but in reality, we get what we pay for. If you hire someone to do the work, you pay for it. If you fail to hire the right person...you will "really" pay for it! Then, there are the "expectations." Time & time again, I see folks who think that a restored vintage car will be like a new car. That is never true. They are never "done." You can't treat it like a new car, drive it, park it, & forget it. It doesn't work that way. Older cars require constant "tinkering." There are no corner service center gas stations left. You have to have enough gumption to raise your own hood, check your oil, coolant level, grease fittings, belt tension, gap your plugs, adjust points, etc., etc. If that's too far a reach...you probably need a different hobby.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

  9. #9
    President Member thunderations's Avatar
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    AMEN to that.
    If you are not hands on with the repair and upkeep, just what is your hobby? Are you an amateur car show participant, a museum curator or a professional check writer?
    When I had my shop and when I worked in others, I saw all of those people and most of them were perplexed and on the verge of being angry. Everything was about the bottom line and cutting the time needed to do the work.
    The happier people were those that did some of their own work and had a shop do the specialty items they didn't know how to do, usually bodywork, paint and upholstery. Heavy mechanical work was either their liking or they loved taking stuff apart and putting it back together. It was their hobby and when the vehicle was drivable, boy did they do it with a big smile. They spent hours working on the vehicle, not because it was broken, but because they could and wanted to.
    It's all according to what your HOBBY really is.
    Quote Originally Posted by jclary View Post
    I'm now 73 years old. I have been interested in old cars since I was a kid. However, I was in my early 40's before I purchased a vintage car that needed extensive bodywork. By that time I had abandoned my college inspired idealism (vocational rehabilitation) career for one that provided a realistic income to meet the demands of providing for a family, paying a mortgage, etc. (Industrial Sales/engineering & consulting). I think my talent for mechanics, processes, and an intense curiosity regarding the application of tools came from growing up poor. Many of the things acquired in my youth were broken discards of others, and either had to be fixed to use or re-engineered to meet our needs.

    Somehow, I developed the attitude that working through mechanical challenges is as rewarding (enjoyable) as merely purchasing an item. Therefore, when my income allowed me to "play," I bought stuff cheap enough to risk my "skill learning curve." Therefore, if I failed, the economic consequences would be considered the "cost of entertainment." Since I was selling much of the types of tooling used in auto work, I included some auto body shops in my customer base. It didn't take long to realize I could do many of the tasks I saw being done. In fact, I knew I could do some of them even better than what I observed. I began buying/scrounging, and picking up tools when the opportunity came along. I'm in no way an expert, nor do I consider myself a "go to person" on such matters. However, I have won trophies with every vehicle I have rescued.

    If I had not done most of the work myself, I probably wouldn't have had but one vintage vehicle. Two things...I really enjoy the challenges of doing the work, and probably couldn't have afforded to pay others to do it for me. OH...and a third thing...since my family does not share my passion for such things, paying others a fair price to do the work, would probably involve depriving them of money for their interests, and that wouldn't be fair.

    You can't look at a commercial shop's quote in a vacuum. Unlike an individual hobbyist, they are under time constraints, dealing with "overhead," and obligations beyond the expectations of casual observers. From my experience, the figure you gave is not out of line, even if it exceeds other investments you have already made in the car. If you are unsure, visit other shops and get more estimates. While there, take a look around. Ask for a tour. Observe the shop, work being done, and what work is languishing awaiting work. Often, that is very telling about how yours will be treated.

    I didn't write this to condemn anyone who pays others to do their work, but in reality, we get what we pay for. If you hire someone to do the work, you pay for it. If you fail to hire the right person...you will "really" pay for it! Then, there are the "expectations." Time & time again, I see folks who think that a restored vintage car will be like a new car. That is never true. They are never "done." You can't treat it like a new car, drive it, park it, & forget it. It doesn't work that way. Older cars require constant "tinkering." There are no corner service center gas stations left. You have to have enough gumption to raise your own hood, check your oil, coolant level, grease fittings, belt tension, gap your plugs, adjust points, etc., etc. If that's too far a reach...you probably need a different hobby.
    1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

  10. #10
    President Member tsenecal's Avatar
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    This type of work wouldn't have to be done at a body/restoration shop. You might check at some local welding shops, and see if it is something they might be interested in doing. In that case, I would think that they would want the seats, carpet, etc, all removed, so that they were just doing the cutting and welding repair. Good Luck with your project!

  11. #11
    President Member E. Davis's Avatar
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    I'm thinking that anybody that would ask 4to5K for that job just doesn't want to do it and its his way of saying thanks but no thanks.

  12. #12
    President Member thunderations's Avatar
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    Just make sure that who ever does it, deals with making sure the doors align when done. Once welded in crooked, you got a bigger problem then what you started with. Lots of things weld to the floor that make the car sturdy and straight that can't be corrected with shims if done wrong.
    1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

  13. #13
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. Davis View Post
    I'm thinking that anybody that would ask 4to5K for that job just doesn't want to do it and its his way of saying thanks but no thanks.
    Yep, MY thought exactly!
    That kind of a price is like saying: "I REALLY do NOT want to do this, BUT if you overpay me enough, I'll deal with it", Money is MONEY!
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




  14. #14
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    Not by plan but by happenstance, I have stumbled into a couple of trunk floor and floorboard replacements in Studes. It is more labor intense than some may think. Then too, there's likelihood, the rust is more extensive than at first look. Once we tear into one, there's no turning back, and just gotta deal with whatever presents. Fortunately, CI has most all the replacement panels needed, but not cheap. However, it is cheaper in the long run (in terms of labor) to use CI's panels, instead of the other, lesser quality panels out there. (Ask me how I know.)

    So, those of us who are lost in the 50s-60s, when sodas were 10 cents, may think the above prices are absurd. But odds are, if its a good shop, they can easily make that much on insurance jobs, with much less intense labor involved. I was impressed with the shop that did the paint & body work on the wife's GT recently. Upon picking the car up, I told the owner I'd like to bring him the 56J in about six months. He replied, "give me a year". I got the hint: he is not eager to start on another Hawk, anytime soon. At least not for a price I can afford. I do not even like to think about the money the Hawk cost. Just thankful the insurance company paid for about half of it, due to a minor rear end hit by a brand 'X' truck.

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    President Member rockinhawk's Avatar
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    100_2379.jpg100_2380.jpgI went to a Heat & Air Conditioning shop and had them bend some metal for my 49 Convertable. It doesn't have all the factory bends and creases, but at least my feet aren't dragging the ground any more. As far as skill in body work goes....I'm a bricklayer!
    Last edited by rockinhawk; 05-15-2018 at 08:37 PM.
    Neil Thornton

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    I am doing a Lark floor replacement right now for someone, The classic panels are good but have issues but since NOS isn't available you make do , They also don't make every part so you make a lot of small parts , Also this car needs every floor support , Classic makes these and they are pretty good. I have had to drill out and retap more bolts than I care to think about . The first thing I do is get the door bolts loose. Then make body support brackets to help keep it shape . The point I'm trying make is would I want some shop that is not familiar with Studebaker doing this to my car I think not. When I get done I will post pictures and the hours it took , Ed

  17. #17
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    Here are some pictures of my floor after removing more of the fiberglass that was around the rusted out area.

    20180515_161003.jpg20180515_160911.jpg20180515_161032.jpg

  18. #18
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    My '64 Daytona floors are displayed below. I used POR-15 and their thin matting to cover over floors far worse than yours. 8 years later the car hasn't fallen apart, the doors still open and the so-called "repair" looks as good as the day I did it. Funny how a guy will weld extruded mesh in the floor of his sand rail and he is a genius. But used POR-15 over metal with a similar structure (meaning many holes) and your a lazy loser who's putting his life in danger. Total cost was about $75.
    I'm not sure what your goals are but in my case it was a $1,275 Ebay car. Do the math and see that it is worth the cost - or not.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  19. #19
    President Member thunderations's Avatar
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    Points well taken and a job done to driver quality standards.
    Now, if there were structural problems due to the rust, this type of solution is not advisable.
    There are so many new products to save metal that has only pinholes from rust. Unless you're a perfectionist that must have everything as the factory built it and no corners cut, a bunch of time and money can be saved. Might be the difference in saving a less desirable body style car and scrapping it.

    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    My '64 Daytona floors are displayed below. I used POR-15 and their thin matting to cover over floors far worse than yours. 8 years later the car hasn't fallen apart, the doors still open and the so-called "repair" looks as good as the day I did it. Funny how a guy will weld extruded mesh in the floor of his sand rail and he is a genius. But used POR-15 over metal with a similar structure (meaning many holes) and your a lazy loser who's putting his life in danger. Total cost was about $75.
    I'm not sure what your goals are but in my case it was a $1,275 Ebay car. Do the math and see that it is worth the cost - or not.
    1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

  20. #20
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barry gibbons View Post
    Here are some pictures of my floor after removing more of the fiberglass that was around the rusted out area.

    20180515_161003.jpg20180515_160911.jpg20180515_161032.jpg
    Depending on your plans for the car, those repairs could cost a lot, or a little. If you are doing a high dollar restoration on a TQ, spend the big bucks. Otherwise, I'd opt for Neal's or Witsend's approaches. Both look very durable to me.

  21. #21
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    Leroy Carry's floors are superior to Classic's but I am not sure if he is still doing parts. His stuff foes into the curved areas if needed.

    JK

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  23. #23
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    Made contact with Bez auto and the price is in the ball park.
    Thanks

  24. #24
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. Davis View Post
    I'm thinking that anybody that would ask 4to5K for that job just doesn't want to do it and its his way of saying thanks but no thanks.
    I agree with that.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by barry gibbons View Post
    Here are some pictures of my floor after removing more of the fiberglass that was around the rusted out area.

    20180515_161003.jpg20180515_160911.jpg20180515_161032.jpg
    Your floors look basically pretty sound as far as I can tell from not very good photos. You might try using that fiberglass reinforced putty on both top and bottom sides of your affected areas. put duct tape on the under side of your affected area. Smooth some putty on your affected area top side. Then remove tape once the putty sets up and then schmoose from under side. Make sure you firstly clean away all rust initially. jimmijim

    D
    Anything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

  26. #26
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    With cars and patience you can cut out the bad part and fabricate a repair panel to fit it. I'd rather do this than spend $$$ at Classic to by a panel that is not right and requires tons of mods to make it fit. You can buy a nice wire welder for $300 and have $3700 left over!

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