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Thread: R/V trailer specific tires..

  1. #1
    President Member
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    R/V trailer specific tires..

    I have seen relevantly new R/V trailers that have destroyed tires including mine.. Seems to be a common thing even with constant tire inspection for pressure and damage.. Should they be replaced with automotive specific tires for more durability.. Long duration of just sitting exposed to sun is not the situation in my case.. Any experience there..

    Ben

  2. #2
    President Member Gunslinger's Avatar
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    Heat and sun exposure is the enemy here. Many, if not most, trailer tires are made offshore so they be purchased cheap by the RV maker and tire retailers. The quality is just there...and most trailers aren't driven continuously so even older trailers have low mileage tires still on them but have degraded with age and sun exposure.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by benaslopoke View Post
    I have seen relevantly new R/V trailers that have destroyed tires including mine.. Seems to be a common thing even with constant tire inspection for pressure and damage.. Should they be replaced with automotive specific tires for more durability.. Long duration of just sitting exposed to sun is not the situation in my case.. Any experience there..

    Ben
    No, don't use car tires on a trailer. And don't underinflate or overload trailer tires.

    https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...jsp?techid=219

  4. #4
    President Member ddub's Avatar
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    I was in an RV club for about 10 years. Trailer tires have a significantly higher failure rate than motor home tires. I have no idea why.
    Don Wilson, Centralia, WA

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  5. #5
    Speedster Member toymobile's Avatar
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    I use a radial trailer tire with 6 ply rating, check air pressure EVERY DAY before moving, doesn't take that long I usually do it while waiting for the engine to warm up.

    Johnny

  6. #6
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    I have been living the trailer tire square dance of late.

    Before adding any comments, I would ask that you provide what tire size and rating you are running right now.
    What tire size and rating does your manufacturer require?

    Remember, on vehicles, the load ratings actuallt start at the tire, then go to the wheel, then the axle, then the suspension.
    So just putting on an uprated tire might not get you where you need to be.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff




    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  7. #7
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    A couple of thoughts on the subject. Check your date codes. Just because you bought new (to you) tires, is no assurance the tires are new. I learned the hard way, that some tires can lay in a distributor warehouse for years before being delivered to the retailer to get installed.

    Another thought that could use some credible data to back it up...OZONE exposure...could be more of an "urban legend" type assumption, but I believe the serviceable life of rubber/elastomeric materials is influenced by the environmental region in which it is located. In the south, frequent electrical storms are common. Lightning produces ATMOSPHERIC OZONE, which attacks and degrades rubber & elastomers. Combine that with the whipsaw of daily and seasonal temperature variations, and rubber deteriorates at higher rates than other regions. (Just a theory)
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
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    SDC member since 1975

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