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Thread: 1951 Champion Convertible For Sale

  1. #1
    President Member
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    1951 Champion Convertible For Sale

    Selling for an aging member, restored within the last 10 years to an exceptional hi level of finish.
    Standard steering and brakes, 3 speed with OD. More pictures available.
    Asking $29,500 US
    DSC_2266.jpgDSC_3866 - Copy.jpgDSC_5538.jpgDSC_2270.jpgDSC_3868.jpg
    Bill Foy
    1000 Islands, Ontario
    1953 Starlight Coupe

  2. #2
    President Member thunderations's Avatar
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    An amazingly nice representation. Anyone should be proud to own that car. Good luck with the sale and congratulations to the future new owner.
    The cost to restore another to a similar condition would easily surpass the price asked.
    1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

  3. #3
    Golden Hawk Member
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    It appears to be a nice restoration with only one fairly glaring error on the exterior.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  4. #4
    President Member Bullet's Avatar
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    Is the error the chrome across the front of the top or the black fender welting? I have seen the chrome covered and exposed not sure which is correct.

    Mark

  5. #5
    Golden Hawk Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullet View Post
    Is the error the chrome across the front of the top or the black fender welting? I have seen the chrome covered and exposed not sure which is correct.

    Mark
    The unpainted (should be body color) rear fender welting. It really stands out and makes the fenders look like separate units (which they really are), but they look more integrated with body color welting.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  6. #6
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    The unpainted (should be body color) rear fender welting. It really stands out and makes the fenders look like separate units (which they really are), but they look more integrated with body color welting.
    At least that can be easily changed, but with painstaking care so as not to damage that nice paint.

    Craig

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    At least that can be easily changed, but with painstaking care so as not to damage that nice paint.

    Craig
    Yes, it can be corrected. I do not know about the "easily" part. I would at least loosen the fenders before attempting to paint the welting. As you probably know, the welting was painted before installation of the fenders in the factory.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    If it was me, I wouldn't paint the welting 'in place' on the car. As a side note, the paint mix for the welting will require a flex-agent additive to prevent cracking.

    Craig

  9. #9
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Many people leave the welting black because that's what Fords have. Also the welting should have a smaller bead, but that size must be harder to find.

    There are a few small, easily corrected errors under the hood, but it's still a very nice car. When a car is that nice, the few flaws it has stand out. If a car is generally ratty, all the flaws blend in.

    I wonder what the rear window looks like.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

  10. #10
    President Member thunderations's Avatar
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    I would not have the top up anyway. That car looks to good with the top down.
    Can't wait to get my 50 Champion Convertible on the road...........major project.

    I wonder what the rear window looks like.[/QUOTE]
    1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

  11. #11
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    The rear window looks like this...
    DSC_3867.jpg
    Bill Foy
    1000 Islands, Ontario
    1953 Starlight Coupe

  12. #12
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    When I restored my'48, I intentionally left the welting black. Of all the goofy things I've observed with building automobiles, painting the welt was an expense and waste of time that probably never impacted the decision for anyone to decide to buy one car over another. It was an expense that diminished profitability, and once the finish began to crack & fail, looked as crappy as any.

    In the late 1990's, I spent hours, helping design, and develop some processes for tier one automotive suppliers to shave off seconds of union labor time in assembly. I'm sure the effort and practices are still under constant examination by process engineers today. If Studebaker had paid more attention to such useless costs, we wouldn't still be trading in so many NOS leftover parts a half-century later.

    While this little example is an oversimplification of the problems leading to the end of Studebaker auto production, it has turned out to benefit us SDC members.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

  13. #13
    Golden Hawk Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclary View Post
    When I restored my'48, I intentionally left the welting black. Of all the goofy things I've observed with building automobiles, painting the welt was an expense and waste of time that probably never impacted the decision for anyone to decide to buy one car over another. It was an expense that diminished profitability, and once the finish began to crack & fail, looked as crappy as any.

    In the late 1990's, I spent hours, helping design, and develop some processes for tier one automotive suppliers to shave off seconds of union labor time in assembly. I'm sure the effort and practices are still under constant examination by process engineers today. If Studebaker had paid more attention to such useless costs, we wouldn't still be trading in so many NOS leftover parts a half-century later.

    While this little example is an oversimplification of the problems leading to the end of Studebaker auto production, it has turned out to benefit us SDC members.
    By this time (the time of the car in question), most manufacturers (the big 3) had gone to quarter panels rather than rear fenders. By Studebaker painting the welting to match the car, visually it looked more like they had quarter panels rather than the fenders that they really had. Appearance had a lot to do with car sales at that time.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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