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Thread: Vintage lock from 1680

  1. #1
    President Member
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    Vintage lock from 1680

    How many people in our era would have the pure skill, initiative andimagination to build such a device with nothing more than hand tools?


    An old door lock.

    You will appreciate this one if you appreciate fine craftsmanship.

    Who says inventors and craftsmen were not sharp almost 350 years ago... especially when you consider the facilities available and not a computer or electric tool in sight?

    This is craftsmanship.

















































    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wngrvYGt2nk


  2. #2
    Speedster Member
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    Very nice! Thank you for showing it.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the post, very enjoyable
    Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

    http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

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  4. #4
    Speedster Member Stude Shoo-wop!'s Avatar
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    Some of these laborious processes seen here were (for better or for worse) dumped when industrialization took hold of Europe in the mid 1700s and really took off by a century later. It makes me wonder if such fine attention to detail can ever truly be done on a mass-produced scale.
    Jake Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

    1962 GT Hawk - completely finished in driveable condition.

  5. #5
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
    It makes me wonder if such fine attention to detail can ever truly be done on a mass-produced scale.
    If someone made molds and dies, a bunch of these could be cranked out. Unfortunately, the set up cost would require a certain minimum sales number.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
    Some of these laborious processes seen here were (for better or for worse) dumped when industrialization took hold of Europe in the mid 1700s and really took off by a century later. It makes me wonder if such fine attention to detail can ever truly be done on a mass-produced scale.
    It a true work of art but could it mass produced? Surely it could. There are many fine firearms (as one example) that are mass produced at tolerances and fitting tighter than a lock. The production would need to be matched to the quality desired. Mass production by itself does not mean a drop in quality but producing a multitude of items quickly and cheaply can lead to lower quality.

    Remember that back then labor was cheap and the drive to have one unique item produced that only you owned was in vogue. Probably still is when I look at the custom car field.

    Bob
    , ,

  7. #7
    President Member ndynis's Avatar
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    Amazing piece of work!
    Thanks for the link!
    Nick

  8. #8
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    This is a good example of what I mean when I often say..."If someone makes it, somebody will collect it." From Stamps to Studebakers, thimbles to plows, art to zippers and everything in between.

    I know I have bored folks to death with my enthusiasm about Studebaker...

    If this guy was my neighbor, I think I'd invest in some security cameras.

    Can you imagine friends and relatives avoiding this guy with a pocket full of locks at gatherings?

    But, for incurable tinkerers like me, this is fascinating.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
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    SDC member since 1975

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