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Thread: How far into the fan shroud should the fan be?

  1. #1
    Speedster Member
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    How far into the fan shroud should the fan be?

    The fan shroud on my '62 GT Hawk was modified by the the previous owner. I am curious as to how far the fan should be into the shroud? Should the fan be completely covered by the shroud? Pictures would be great if you have them available. I've been looking on the internet and not coming up with much.
    Jim Kaufman
    Kearney NE

    1952 2R10
    1953 Champion (sold it and still kicking myself)
    1962 GT Hawk
    1963 R3984 Avanti R1

  2. #2
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    The Standard rule of thumb is: Half IN, Half OUT. That is also the way Studebaker built them.

    On some Models like Larks, a spacer was required to get proper Radiator to Fan distance without a Shroud.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




  3. #3
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    Perfect StudeRich, That's what I was going to aim for. I think someone stated that the GT Hawk radiator had to be at a slight angle...do you concur?
    Jim Kaufman
    Kearney NE

    1952 2R10
    1953 Champion (sold it and still kicking myself)
    1962 GT Hawk
    1963 R3984 Avanti R1

  4. #4
    Speedster Member RDWEAVER's Avatar
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    On the same subject.... I have a question. My fan appears to be almost all of the way into the shroud. I have noticed on really hot days if I let it sit and idle the temperature will go above the comfort level until I get it going down the road again. To remedy this, a 1 inch shorter fan spacer could be used. Can anybody here from experience comment on whether this distance will make any difference on air flow while sitting still? There was talk here about water pump impeller clearance at one time. I did not check mine because I had bought it from a Studebaker vendor and assumed it had to be correct but I am wondering if I need to check this also. What do you people think?

  5. #5
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    I found this on the internet:
    If you’re running a belt-driven fan, there are a few things you need to do in order to maximize the engine cooling that the fan can provide. It’s critical that the fan be positioned properly within the fan shroud and that there is just enough clearance around the fan blades. The first thing we want to make sure is that you actually have a fan shroud. If you rely on a belt-driven fan for engine cooling, a fan shroud is a must to pull the air through the radiator. Without a shroud, air will take the path of least resistance, pulling air from over and under the radiator instead of through it. Most people that have cooling problems with a belt-driven fan at idle and slow speeds don’t have a shroud – their fan is drawing very little airflow through the radiator, and most of their cooling comes from ram air being driven through the radiator at speeds above 40 mph.
    If you have a fan shroud, the position of the fan blades in the shroud is very important to maximize airflow. Looking from the side of the engine, the fan blades should be half in and half out of the shroud.
    If the fan is too far inside of the shroud, it won’t pull as much air through the shroud as it could. Instead it will create turbulence inside the shroud, spinning the air, but not efficiently pulling it through. If the blades are not far enough inside the shroud, the fan will pull air from around the shroud rather than through it.
    We manufacture a variety of fan spacers to move the fan forward and rearward, letting you achieve the optimal position. You can use 1 or more spacers – up to 3 inches in total. Make sure you use Flex-a-lite spacers; using any other brand with a Flex-a-lite belt-driven fan will void the warranty.
    It’s also important that the fan blades do not extend past the top, bottom or sides of radiator surface. This causes dissimilar resistance along the length of the fan blades, which stresses them.
    The other very important fan to fan shroud measurement is the distance around the circumference of the fan and the circular opening of the shroud. If there is too much space here, the fan won’t be as efficient as it could be in pulling air through the radiator. If there is not enough clearance, you run the risk of the fan contacting the shroud with natural engine movement and body flex that affects the radiator and fan shroud mounting. This can damage the fan shroud and the fan. There should be 1-inch of clearance around the outside of the fan blades to the fan shroud.
    The last measurement you should check is the distance from the face of the fan to the radiator. There should be at least 1 inch of clearance between the two. This is to accommodate normal engine and radiator movement, and also the flex that occurs in the fan blades at higher engine rpm.
    Checking these measurements when running a belt-driven fan and a fan shroud will solve overheating problems and fan contact problems caused by improperly placed fans and shrouds.
    Jim Kaufman
    Kearney NE

    1952 2R10
    1953 Champion (sold it and still kicking myself)
    1962 GT Hawk
    1963 R3984 Avanti R1

  6. #6
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Never Enough Studebakers View Post
    Perfect StudeRich, That's what I was going to aim for. I think someone stated that the GT Hawk radiator had to be at a slight angle...do you concur?
    Yes the mounting brackets should be welded on the tanks allowing a slight angle, so you just bolt it in to the pre drilled holes in the Support and it's good.

  7. #7
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    Someone tossed the orginal radiator and the brackets. So I am building my own. So far things are looking pretty good. No it won't be original but it will be functional. This will be my everyday car here soon. Going old school.
    Jim Kaufman
    Kearney NE

    1952 2R10
    1953 Champion (sold it and still kicking myself)
    1962 GT Hawk
    1963 R3984 Avanti R1

  8. #8
    President Member (S)'s Avatar
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    There were spacers of different thickness sizes.

  9. #9
    Speedster Member RDWEAVER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Never Enough Studebakers View Post
    I found this on the internet:
    If you’re running a belt-driven fan, there are a few things you need to do in order to maximize the engine cooling that the fan can provide. It’s critical that the fan be positioned properly within the fan shroud and that there is just enough clearance around the fan blades. The first thing we want to make sure is that you actually have a fan shroud. If you rely on a belt-driven fan for engine cooling, a fan shroud is a must to pull the air through the radiator. Without a shroud, air will take the path of least resistance, pulling air from over and under the radiator instead of through it. Most people that have cooling problems with a belt-driven fan at idle and slow speeds don’t have a shroud – their fan is drawing very little airflow through the radiator, and most of their cooling comes from ram air being driven through the radiator at speeds above 40 mph.
    If you have a fan shroud, the position of the fan blades in the shroud is very important to maximize airflow. Looking from the side of the engine, the fan blades should be half in and half out of the shroud.
    If the fan is too far inside of the shroud, it won’t pull as much air through the shroud as it could. Instead it will create turbulence inside the shroud, spinning the air, but not efficiently pulling it through. If the blades are not far enough inside the shroud, the fan will pull air from around the shroud rather than through it.
    We manufacture a variety of fan spacers to move the fan forward and rearward, letting you achieve the optimal position. You can use 1 or more spacers – up to 3 inches in total. Make sure you use Flex-a-lite spacers; using any other brand with a Flex-a-lite belt-driven fan will void the warranty.
    It’s also important that the fan blades do not extend past the top, bottom or sides of radiator surface. This causes dissimilar resistance along the length of the fan blades, which stresses them.
    The other very important fan to fan shroud measurement is the distance around the circumference of the fan and the circular opening of the shroud. If there is too much space here, the fan won’t be as efficient as it could be in pulling air through the radiator. If there is not enough clearance, you run the risk of the fan contacting the shroud with natural engine movement and body flex that affects the radiator and fan shroud mounting. This can damage the fan shroud and the fan. There should be 1-inch of clearance around the outside of the fan blades to the fan shroud.
    The last measurement you should check is the distance from the face of the fan to the radiator. There should be at least 1 inch of clearance between the two. This is to accommodate normal engine and radiator movement, and also the flex that occurs in the fan blades at higher engine rpm.
    Checking these measurements when running a belt-driven fan and a fan shroud will solve overheating problems and fan contact problems caused by improperly placed fans and shrouds.
    Thank You for this information. I will do some measuring and might make some changes. I will post results later when it gets hot this summer.

  10. #10
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    My '62 GT If you look close you can just see the edge of a fan blade, between the crank and water pump pullys. Sorry, this site always turns my pics upside down.
    20170206_200426.jpg

  11. #11
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    Just a side note some stationary and slow moving tractors have the fans on backwards, this also avoids excessive dust from accumulating on the engine

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