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Thread: Fuel pump leak

  1. #1
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    Fuel pump leak

    Hi All- It appears my fuel tank has taken up residence in the sump of my engine.
    Fuel was seen dripping from the front of the engine today as I was doing other jobs on the 62 GT. Really unfortunate was the matter of wasting brand new oil that was going into the engine-obviously raising the level of the already fuel laden sump . Fuel started running from the front main seal. Now I believe it's obvious the fuel pump is the culprit here although the diaphragm is not perforated, and I believe the check valves may have allowed fuel into the sump over the last week. I say this because in the past I have not been able to get fuel to the carb with the car parked with the front of the car high. The picture shows what my driveway is angled like and the car has been parked on ramps like this since a 15min engine run last sunday.
    The question I'd like to ask here is how much reliability should I expect from the check valves if I insist on having the car parked nose down down the driveway in future? Has any body else had this problem?
    Steve
    17jan18 Nearly completed.jpg

  2. #2
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    Steve,
    If I were you I'd replace the fuel pump ASAP. You should expect 100% reliability from the check valves. The situation you describe is dangerous.
    Bob

  3. #3
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    I got rid of mechanical fuel pumps on Studes several decades ago, and have never looked back. If concerned with easier starts, reliability, and not wanting to ruin your motor, you might wanna do the same.

  4. #4
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    The Original Carter Fuel Pumps always lasted over 20 Years, so a good rebuilt Original Carter Design Pump with modern Alcohol resistant Parts OR a New Studebaker Vendor Carter Super Pump modified for Avanti as used on 318/360 Chrysler prods. should last easily as long with no problems.

    These have a better Seal on the actuator Arm to prevent Fuel intrusion into the Crankcase and a sealed Actuator Lever Pin to prevent Oil leaking unlike the AC Design, Airtex pump you most likely have now.

    The ONLY way Fuel can get from the wet side of the Diaphragm to crankcase would be a Failed Diaphragm. The Valves only control the Fuel FLOW IN and Out.
    Either way, you still need a good replacement.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




  5. #5
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    As an added small safety device you could install a shutoff valve at the fuel pump to avoid live fuel against the pump, a good anti theft device too.

  6. #6
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    In the meantime shouldn't you park the car nose first while you contemplate the necessary repair?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbisacca View Post
    Steve,
    If I were you I'd replace the fuel pump ASAP. You should expect 100% reliability from the check valves. The situation you describe is dangerous.
    Bob
    Hi Bob- I agree with you wholeheartedly !
    Steve

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeHall View Post
    I got rid of mechanical fuel pumps on Studes several decades ago, and have never looked back. If concerned with easier starts, reliability, and not wanting to ruin your motor, you might wanna do the same.
    Hi Joe-
    I have tended to be a bit of a purist to date and like our cars as-was/factory, but I can't help thinking in this day and age a suitable electric pump might be a serious option.
    Still mulling this one over....
    Steve

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by StudeRich View Post
    The Original Carter Fuel Pumps always lasted over 20 Years, so a good rebuilt Original Carter Design Pump with modern Alcohol resistant Parts OR a New Studebaker Vendor Carter Super Pump modified for Avanti as used on 318/360 Chrysler prods. should last easily as long with no problems.

    These have a better Seal on the actuator Arm to prevent Fuel intrusion into the Crankcase and a sealed Actuator Lever Pin to prevent Oil leaking unlike the AC Design, Airtex pump you most likely have now.

    The ONLY way Fuel can get from the wet side of the Diaphragm to crankcase would be a Failed Diaphragm. The Valves only control the Fuel FLOW IN and Out.
    Either way, you still need a good replacement.
    Hi Rich- Tending to prefer originality I agree with your comment about 'pumps lasting 20 years'. I drove a clapped out 64 Cruiser as a daily driver for ages with never a problem along this line so I think repairing the original Carter unit is a no brainer. Thanks for confirming my own thoughts and the Keep It Simple, Stupid principle .

    However.... The failure of the pump Diaphragm might well be only a very recent happenstance, but do you feel I am on the right track assuming the check valves are faulty due to the reluctance to 'draw' fuel uphill? I substituted another pump from My 61 Hawk some time ago (and I was pretty sure I'd rebuilt that one, too!) and it didn't improve the 'Draw ' in the least- same problem .
    Need to rebuild a bunch of spares, I guess
    Steve

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by altair View Post
    As an added small safety device you could install a shutoff valve at the fuel pump to avoid live fuel against the pump, a good anti theft device too.
    Hi Altair- Considering the 'interest' that this car garners from all who see it in my drive, I reckon your suggestion is a likely project. Considering the ease that these older cars can be stolen, and the spate of carjackings going on here in Melbourne these days, a little valve in the circuit might be wise.
    Steve

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.J. lavallee View Post
    In the meantime shouldn't you park the car nose first while you contemplate the necessary repair?
    Hi TJ- On face value that might sound sensible but for now it's busted in place and aint going nowhere until I sort out the pump . When I get that sorted it ought to make no difference which way it's tilted. I reckon those check valves are an issue.
    Steve

  12. #12
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    Check valves may or may not be faulty, but for sure the diaphram is bad, and most likely the only reason it won't draw the fuel.

  13. #13
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    I dismantled the pump and checked the diaphragm- for the life of me I can't see any perforation.
    Knowing the thing leaked like it did I accept it's faulty based on StudeRich's rationale and replace it anyway.
    I knocked out the check valves and found them like new. These were re -installed and I can't fault their operation.
    I intend bench testing the other pump while I'm at it.
    Steve

  14. #14
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    Hi Steve, when you repair or test those punps/ check valves a squirt of WD40 helps a bunch. They work best when wet. Luck Doofus

  15. #15
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    If there are any leaks in the fuel lines between the fuel pump and tank, that is another good reason it can't draw the fuel.

    If you have a vacuum gauge, have someone crank the engine while you check the vacuum on the fuel pump inlet.

  16. #16
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    Hi All- I thought I would update with what I have found. The fuel pump diaphragm looks ok but I'd bet on it leaking inside its center, underneath the steel washer. I have put a kit through it and found even though the check valve rubbers to be absolutely first class, but there are no springs behind them. Bench testing this pump, I find it appears to have quite a bit more vacuum at the inlet side and more forceful delivery at the carb side. PO down the line has obviously left these springs out- makes a huge difference to its operation. (worked but, meh...). Adding a fresh sump full of oil (Mobil XLD 'Classic'20W-50) with conviction! With any luck I won't have to manually prime the rotten thing when it's parked uphill any more.
    Steve

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