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Thread: Avanti

  1. #1
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    Avanti

    Do all the Avanti,s have a fiberglass body and if so why is the "Hog Trough" under the car made out of metal that seems to be one of the places prone to deteriorate ? Also how reliable were these cars and how well were they mfgd compared to the ones that came later after Studebaker sold the rights to them and they were mfgd for a short time in the 70s and 80s by someone else. As far as performance goes it seems that any car capable of 170 mph turning out 340hp with a fiberglass body that will not rust would be very desirable to own. I have heard that the body on the early cars wasn't made out of fiberglass but from some other cloth material and this was indeed a problem in the mfg of the early cars. So what's the facts ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Do all the Avanti,s have a fiberglass body and if so why is the "Hog Trough" under the car made out of metal that seems to be one of the places prone to deteriorate ? Also how reliable were these cars and how well were they mfgd compared to the ones that came later after Studebaker sold the rights to them and they were mfgd for a short time in the 70s and 80s by someone else. As far as performance goes it seems that any car capable of 170 mph turning out 340hp with a fiberglass body that will not rust would be very desirable to own. I have heard that the body on the early cars wasn't made out of fiberglass but from some other cloth material and this was indeed a problem in the mfg of the early cars. So what's the facts ?
    ALL Avantis were fiberglass bodies but 4 major components are made of steel and very prone to the tin worm; frame, hog troughs, frame around windshield and roll bar. The body's structure essentially remained unchanged until 1985.

    Studebaker never spent out on rust proofing...to the level that the insides of the hogs were never even painted on the inside nor was the windshield frame.

    Te hog troughs are needed to support and connect the body to the frame itself while adding stiffness to the whole structure. They can be replaced, while labor intensive it is straight forward and the parts are readily available.

    Search through the forum's files, there is a lot of reference material here. Be careful on what you here elsewhere as there can be a lot of urban legend quality stuff, such as the fiberglass bodied Avantis were made in "name any other country but USA" and so forth.

    Ken Buchanan

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    Ken,
    thanks for the info. If i'm hearing you correctly a person would be far ahead to research these potential problem areas before even considering buying one or consult with an expert or someone knowledgeable about them.
    I do kinda like the styling kinda reminds me of the AMC Javelins when they came out, very different styling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Ken,
    thanks for the info. If i'm hearing you correctly a person would be far ahead to research these potential problem areas before even considering buying one or consult with an expert or someone knowledgeable about them.
    I do kinda like the styling kinda reminds me of the AMC Javelins when they came out, very different styling.
    There is a lot of good info, don't get me wrong, just be careful. This page and the AOAI forum both are rich with info, Bob Johnstone's site http://www.studebaker-info.org/avantix4.html is a nother good one. If you find a good Avanti, they are wonderful! Find one with rust and it can be hell. I spent about 3 years learning about these cars before I pulled the trigger in my `63. I'm glad I took my time and I am glad I bought the car I did.

    If it gets overwhelming or you or some data seems conflicting, don't hesitate to post here or on AOAI forum.

    Good luck,

    Ken

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    Ken is correct. A couple more areas of concern are the frame, particularly the flat bottom steel, from the front portion of the rear spring perches and over the rear axle and the rear cross member that sets at the rear of the frame.

    I own a 74 and 83. While I don't know about the build quality of the 63/64 units, my 83 has better fit and finish than the 74. I'm not saying stay away from the 70's just that the Blake unit were better.

    The best way to buy one is have it looked at by a local Studebaker or Avanti club member if possible. Once you've worked on them, the trouble prone areas are easier to find.

    It's generally less expensive to pay the price for one in good condition to start with than to rebuild a cheap one. The exception is if you do all/most of the work yourself.

    Bob
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    Thanks again Ken.
    As of right now I wouldn't know a good one from a bad one. I'm sure there are models that are better than others and less prone to engineering short comings. It also seems that most of them are priced at around $20K and up. I think I remember reading somewhere that the cloth used was Rayon or some such cloth and not fiberglass. Was just wondering if the later cars were made different. It seems you did your research before buying and not just based on looks and heresy.

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    Bob,
    does your 83 have a 305 Chevy engine and does it ride on the Studebaker Lark frame like the early models supposedly did ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Bob,
    does your 83 have a 305 Chevy engine and does it ride on the Studebaker Lark frame like the early models supposedly did ?
    1983 is the last year of the chrome bumper cars and yes! it still has the reinforced Lark frame. Underneath is exactly like the earlier models. It no longer has the 305 as I replaced it with a 355 roller cam SBC. Upside of these cars, overdrive GM transmissions. Downside is it has the archaic computer controlled 305. These engines can be made to run ok but they never had much performance and the computer control still had a long way to go.

    If I could pick from the 68- 83 Avanti as a road car, I'd take the upscale 83 and replace the engine with a crate 350 with either a carb or aftermarket EFI system.

    Second choice would be a nice model of about any year from 67- 74 and possibly add a GM overdrive due to the lack of emission controls. Between 74 and 83, I'd find the best one with a bad engine and transmission, if possible, and upgrade the engine and tranny.

    After all that, if you find one you like, it performs as you like, turns your crank and has the condition you like, no problem with buying that one. I just have a set of performance needs and a desire to put my finger prints all over the vehicle that may be far from your requirements.

    Bob
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    Bob,
    thanks, that sounds like honest good advice. I guess it would depend on your own ability to do any of the needed work or your financial ability to hire it all done. Finding a 74-83 with a bad engine and transmission without a lot of rust problems might be a solution but might be hard to find. Remember the Ford Deuce Coupe cries, "Steel Is Real" . That's true but there is something to say about fiberglass and No Rust! I have owned fiberglass cars like Corvette or custom build and find it to be excellent. Dodge thought it was good enough for their Viper as well as other manufacturers. I for one like glass cars and the Avanti styling.

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    As usual, it depends what you want to do. I really enjoy driving the 64 as it has a 4spd. However, the 78 is less noisy and is a much better road car. This is likely because of the 350/400 and relatively higher rear end. FWIW, the Studebaker Avantis command higher prices. You can get a good #3 driver Studebaker in the $20,000 range. For about half that, you can get a good driver from the range of 70s and 80s non Studes.
    78 Avanti RQB 2792
    64 Avanti R1 R5408
    63 Avanti R1 R4551
    63 Avanti R1 R2281
    62 GT Hawk V15949
    56 GH 6032504
    56 GH 6032588
    55 Speedster 7160047
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    Quote Originally Posted by 64studeavanti View Post
    As usual, it depends what you want to do. I really enjoy driving the 64 as it has a 4spd. However, the 78 is less noisy and is a much better road car. This is likely because of the 350/400 and relatively higher rear end. FWIW, the Studebaker Avantis command higher prices. You can get a good #3 driver Studebaker in the $20,000 range. For about half that, you can get a good driver from the range of 70s and 80s non Studes.
    I also would like the 4spd as it is fun to drive. Are you saying that the non Stude Avantis 70s-80s are worth less than the Studebaker versions ? IYHO what would be a good road car with a 4 spd tranny and a dependable V8 ?

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    President Member Gunslinger's Avatar
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    Everything else being equal...which it rarely is...a Studebaker Avanti holds its value more than a post-Studebaker example. It's the original and some look at later Avantis as little more than factory assembled kit cars (that description does tend to be at least somewhat appropriate for post-1985 Avantis).

    Any Avanti can be a good road car. Avanti IIs as the years progressed, became less sporting and more grand tourers...but the market headed that way. As far as your last question...the Studebaker V8 and the small block Chevy are both excellent and dependable engines. The difference is the Chevy is easier parts-wise for servicing. I think 4-speed transmissions are more easily found in Studebaker Avantis than Avanti IIs...not that many were built. You can always convert any Avanti with an automatic to a 4-, 5- or 6-speed manual...the parts are available and it only takes money.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunslinger View Post
    Everything else being equal...which it rarely is...a Studebaker Avanti holds its value more than a post-Studebaker example. It's the original and some look at later Avantis as little more than factory assembled kit cars (that description does tend to be at least somewhat appropriate for post-1985 Avantis).

    Any Avanti can be a good road car. Avanti IIs as the years progressed, became less sporting and more grand tourers...but the market headed that way. As far as your last question...the Studebaker V8 and the small block Chevy are both excellent and dependable engines. The difference is the Chevy is easier parts-wise for servicing. I think 4-speed transmissions are more easily found in Studebaker Avantis than Avanti IIs...not that many were built. You can always convert any Avanti with an automatic to a 4-, 5- or 6-speed manual...the parts are available and it only takes money.
    Thanks for the info. It seems there is much more to consider in regarding the Avantis than some of the other Studebakers. It seems each model has its own issues in regards to that model. Im guessing the 1965 Altman Avanti is about as scarce as hens teeth and very much a collector. Much research is needed on these cars if a person is going to collect one for a road car.

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    As Gunslinger said, a much higher percentage of the Stude Avantis had 4-speeds than did the Avanti IIs. And as he noted, Nate Altman was trying to appeal to an older, more upscale customer, so most of the Avanti IIs were equipped with automatics. Due to the pending 1975 emissions standards, the 1974 models were the last Avanti IIs to be built with 4-speeds until Steve Blake took over ten years later. The early AIIs came with 327s, then 350s. The 72-76 models came with 400s, which are real torque monsters. I have a 74 with 4-speed, either the last or next-to-last built. It's a great driver.

    Avanti Motors would equip the cars to the buyer's specs, including some weird interior materials and colors. Don't forget -- it was the 1970s. Fortunately, my 74 came with a medium brown interior, though the brown shag carpet drives my wife crazy. I may change it someday, but it doesn't bother me as much as it does her.

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    All depends on what you want to do. I restored '63 R2658. Almost entirely pure Studebaker except for electronic ignition, upgraded interior, LED lights but that's what I wanted. If you want a road car with fewer hassles, the SBC Avanti II might be the car for you. However,as wiser ones have said, there's nothing more expensive than a cheap Avanti.
    "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
    R.W. Emerson

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    If you want to see what Avanti's looked like as they progressed, you can Google each year and also go through the sold and offered Ebay vehicles. In the 80's they were offered with excellent leather interiors, Recaro seats and other high end trappings in-line with a vehicle of a $30,000 price tag in that era.

    As stated previously, the SBC gives you the possibility of a wide range of engines and manual tranny's up to six speeds and automatics with overdrive. Some members have gone as far as LS engines and modern electronic overdrive transmissions.

    The early Avanti's were not know for the best seats for long distance driving but the early models still look the best with the round headlights IMHO.

    It's your choice and money but every era offers something to certain individuals and that's the conundrum that each first time buyer needs to research.

    I've lusted for an Avanti since 1963 but because of my needs I chose the II series. As I said earlier, my 83 is a very upscale 355 SBC with a 2004R tranny and leather interior. The 74 is a much modified 383 stroker SBC with a T56 6-speed manual and much modified interior with newer leather seats and a unique digital dash.

    Take your time, look at many, build your vision of what you want and go from there.

    Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Thanks again Ken.
    As of right now I wouldn't know a good one from a bad one. I'm sure there are models that are better than others and less prone to engineering short comings. It also seems that most of them are priced at around $20K and up. I think I remember reading somewhere that the cloth used was Rayon or some such cloth and not fiberglass. Was just wondering if the later cars were made different. It seems you did your research before buying and not just based on looks and heresy.

    Not all Avantis are fiberglass, as was stated earlier. 1963-1989 models were fiberglass. Then Avanti switched to Kevlar. They later switched back to fiberglass.

    I have owned new and used Avantis and worked on many others.
    Gary L.
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    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Thanks for the info. It seems there is much more to consider in regarding the Avantis than some of the other Studebakers. It seems each model has its own issues in regards to that model. Im guessing the 1965 Altman Avanti is about as scarce as hens teeth and very much a collector. Much research is needed on these cars if a person is going to collect one for a road car.
    There were only 56 1965 Avantis built (about 1/6 the number of 1953 Corvettes). After 53 years, how many good ones do you think still exist?
    Gary L.
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    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    Stuhawk,
    I guess I picked the path similar to Bob. My '70 (Nates' actual personal car from San Diego) I hot rodded with electric Recaros, Doug Nash 5 speed(formerly with Borg Warner Automatic), custom Stewart Warner gauges etc. and have left my '83 very stock. They have a gorgeous leather interior(still stinks after 35 years). But as sweetolbob stated, the 305 sucks big time hence I'm building a 406 cid to wake it up. Due to emission standards of the day there is very little hope for 305's which make economical sense when crate motors are so cheap.
    Good luck in your quest. You won't be sorry.
    Bill

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    I think you have been given some good advice. Just a couple more thoughts
    The power windows on Stude and early Avanti IIs are problematic as they crack the mountings on the door. Additionally, there could be door hinge problems where the mounting pad on the door frame is damaged. This could be an extensive repair. From what I can tell, based on my 78, these problems seem to have been remedied. There have also been issues with leaking sun roofs.

    Studebakers have tapered rear axles. The later ones have flanged. Tapered axles have been known to crack - so the flanged axles may be a better choice for a car driven regularly. BTW, there are flanged axle conversions for the Studes.

    If you want a concours car. I would get a 63 or 64. The ideal is the R2 4spd. The downside is these were not available with A/C. However, some have added aftermarket A/C systems.

    If you want to have a good driver that you can modify, you should get one ftom the 70s or 80s as modifications will not devalue them and may actually increase their value.

    One other thing, try to find one with a good dash pad. Replacements are not available.
    78 Avanti RQB 2792
    64 Avanti R1 R5408
    63 Avanti R1 R4551
    63 Avanti R1 R2281
    62 GT Hawk V15949
    56 GH 6032504
    56 GH 6032588
    55 Speedster 7160047
    55 Speedster 7165279

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    One thing to look at is the frame.For awhile I believe in 1972 Nate ran out of frames and used station wagon frames and cut a section out on each frame rail to get the Avanti wheelbase.
    The welds rusted badly and were not very good.
    He spend $100.000 to have Budd set up the old dies to make new frame rails.
    Nostalgic still has frame rails in stock.
    I believe the welds were under the drivers seat.
    I believe that someone (SI?)now makes new dashes from the old dies.
    If you want your Avanti restored the correct way and to like new condition,let
    Deluxe Autowerks in West Chicago do it. 630 293 7750.
    Robert Kapteyn

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    WOW Guys !
    that's a lot of info to absorb. Thanks to all. For me I guess it boils down to a dependable road car that has a 4spd transmission and a clean bill of health as far as rust issues. I just wonder what it looks like from the drivers seat looking over that long hood with those fender projections on both sides........must feel good. There is just something about a high fendered car with a long hood that makes you feel good when you drive it. It's like you become a part of the body. That's also why I like the 61 Hawk for the fender / hood contours. Decisions, decisions, decisions.

  23. #23
    President Member Gunslinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkapteyn View Post
    One thing to look at is the frame.For awhile I believe in 1972 Nate ran out of frames and used station wagon frames and cut a section out on each frame rail to get the Avanti wheelbase.
    The welds rusted badly and were not very good.
    He spend $100.000 to have Budd set up the old dies to make new frame rails.
    Nostalgic still has frame rails in stock.
    I believe the welds were under the drivers seat.
    I believe that someone (SI?)now makes new dashes from the old dies.
    If you want your Avanti restored the correct way and to like new condition,let
    Deluxe Autowerks in West Chicago do it. 630 293 7750.
    Robert Kapteyn
    The information I have is it was in 1977 at car RQB2596 the new frame was used with the next two using the old frame, then RQB2599 was the next to use the new frame then the new frame was used continually from RQB2607.

    I understand when they ran out of original frames Avanti Motors adapted a lighter gauge Studebaker frame with the X-member welded in and stiffeners added to bring it up to the same standards as the original. I stress that's what I understand but one can not always be sure with Avanti Motors.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    Gunslinger,
    good info to know and record for possible future use.

    Does anyone on SDC have an Avanti pic that they would share taken from the drivers seat looking out over the hood as if you were driving it. I am curious as to how the hood/scoop/ fender projections might look when driving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Gunslinger,
    good info to know and record for possible future use.

    Does anyone on SDC have an Avanti pic that they would share taken from the drivers seat looking out over the hood as if you were driving it. I am curious as to how the hood/scoop/ fender projections might look when driving.
    Not exactly over the hood, but maybe these would put you in the mood...
    Last edited by 53k; 02-15-2018 at 01:39 PM.

    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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    53k,
    I'm already in the mood. Those are nice pics, thanks.

    Confucius say "caveat emptor" or in laymans terms, go slowly and proceed with caution. Much study needed, lol.

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    Nostalgic Motors in Wixom, MI displayed a new Avanti dash pad that they are manufacturing at the SDC Int'l Meet last summer. The price was $2000.
    -Dwight

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    Stuhawk, there are members in your area that have both Studebaker Avantis as well as Avanti II's. If you're thinking about getting an Avanti, I could PM you some people to contact that are in the Gateway(St Louis) and Crossroads(Effingham) chapters of SDC. It sounds like you're trying to do due diligence before getting an Avanti. All the advice from the guys above is worthwhile. You need also to look at what your intended use of the vehicle as well. Will the car be a driver or collector car? All cars in the '63-'85 range are going to need some going over if you're intending to hit the road with it. Making a car road worthy could easily surpass the purchase price of the car. Having both a '76 coupe and an '89 convertible, I speak from experience.

    I've had my '76 since January 2011 and its gone through a frame on restoration during the time I've had it. The '89 was resto-modded some time before I bought it in November 2014, having a 383 SBC motor and 4L60 AOD transmission, Ford 9" rear end, 4 wheel disc brakes along with 20's on the rear and 18's on the front. The '76 has the original 400 block but has been rebuilt twice, most recently last fall with EFI, aluminum heads, new EFI cam, rods and pistons installed. The THM 400 transmission was changed out in 2011 for a rebuilt 200R4 AOD, new suspension, brake upgrade, brake lines, fuel lines, rear end rebuilt, new weather stripping as well as a total body repaint have been done. The car has had 37000 miles put on it since I got it 7 years ago, going to both coasts and throughout the midwest for Studebaker Meets and a Rte 66 trip. The second engine rebuild happened last fall when a cracked head was discovered converting to EFI. I love to drive the country in the '76 and am planning a drive to the meet in Tacoma in August with it. To do that amount of driving, I felt I needed to put that amount of work into it to have a reliable vehicle.

    Your intended use for the car should be considered before making a purchase. Avanti II's aren't bringing the money the originals are, but in my opinion are a higher quality build and more modern. I had a '64 way back in '66-'69 and remembered the body cracks and driver's door hinge issues as well mechanical unreliability a 18 year old kid(me) most likely contributed to. Getting back into Avantis in 2011 turned out to be a pleasant surprise when I started looking at Avanti II's and saw the improvements over Studebaker that Newman and Altman had made. PM me if you have any questions about my experiences or if you'd like to see some owners near you.
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    plwindish,

    Thanks for the info and offer. I'm undecided on what to do at the present time . I don't drive the one I have now or the two before that. I wouldn't consider a trip all the way out to Tacoma Wa in a car that was built in 1961 like my Hawk until and unless it could prove mighty dependable. Best keep your cell phone charged up, lol. I truly believe it would cost a lot of money and labor to get it that reliable. I'm probably half way there now. I plan on making some short trips this spring and see how it goes. I thought maybe the Avanti (70s-80S) might be the answer but after some research i'm not sure. Having a breakdown a long way from home wouldn't be good and I doubt you could go to the local parts store for some things . Now if your traveling in a group/tour with other cars it might not be so bad as you would have some help if needed.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Gunslinger,
    good info to know and record for possible future use.

    Does anyone on SDC have an Avanti pic that they would share taken from the drivers seat looking out over the hood as if you were driving it. I am curious as to how the hood/scoop/ fender projections might look when driving.

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    Sailingadventure,

    Sir, thank you , thank you, thank you. What can I say but "WOW" . I would have been glad to see a pic looking over the hood but a 9 minute video clip, well it almost took me over the edge, lol. That view and the sound of the engine/exhaust going through the gears was music to my ears. I will definitely look at that clip many, many times. It was just like I was the one driving. The "Fender Projections, Hood Scoop and Lazy S Insignia" all combine for a truly fun driving experience. If I may ask what year Avanti is this ?
    Thanks again,
    Tom

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    plwindish,

    Please excuse me but I intended to commit about your car pic on my last post. I'm guessing that's the 76 your talking about and if so it sure is pretty. Also those wire wheels make it look like a million bucks. Worth the effort to maintain them ! I'll bet your mighty proud of it and sounds like you have went to great lengths to make it modern performance along with modern ride and totally reliable. For sure no small feat. Your going down the road of "Miles Of Smiles"

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    An Avanti is really as they used to say “A Lark in a Gilded Cage”. And though I’m a 40 year Studebaker owner/driver, realistically the Lark is a cheaply built transportation machine. The Avanti is a very rushed 6 week redesign with a Lot of flaws. The seats are horrible, where you want lumbar support, you find a hollow. Where you put your feet driving, you feel 80% of the heat coming from your exhaust pipes. When you try to fit your NOS AM-FM radio you spent 2000$ for, you find the space required to shoehorn it into position is about 30% too small. When you put down your power window, there’s a 50% chance it won’t go back up. They always seem to leak water somewhere, and combined with the ever present oil and gas smells the aroma inside is “unique”. The stock rear view mirror position is idiotic. Then there are the electrics....and grounds. Handling is nowhere up to what the car Looks like it should have. Wayyy to much front end weight, and remember it’s a Lark. ••••••• and always remember “There is Nothing more Expensive than a Cheap Avanti”•••••• My “been there done that” advice (which I wish I would have followed when I bought mine) PAY A LOT OF MONEY and get one that’s near perfect and well sorted out by an expert.

  34. #34
    Commander Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Greenville, Illinois
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by 64V19816 View Post
    An Avanti is really as they used to say “A Lark in a Gilded Cage”. And though I’m a 40 year Studebaker owner/driver, realistically the Lark is a cheaply built transportation machine. The Avanti is a very rushed 6 week redesign with a Lot of flaws. The seats are horrible, where you want lumbar support, you find a hollow. Where you put your feet driving, you feel 80% of the heat coming from your exhaust pipes. When you try to fit your NOS AM-FM radio you spent 2000$ for, you find the space required to shoehorn it into position is about 30% too small. When you put down your power window, there’s a 50% chance it won’t go back up. They always seem to leak water somewhere, and combined with the ever present oil and gas smells the aroma inside is “unique”. The stock rear view mirror position is idiotic. Then there are the electrics....and grounds. Handling is nowhere up to what the car Looks like it should have. Wayyy to much front end weight, and remember it’s a Lark. ••••••• and always remember “There is Nothing more Expensive than a Cheap Avanti”•••••• My “been there done that” advice (which I wish I would have followed when I bought mine) PAY A LOT OF MONEY and get one that’s near perfect and well sorted out by an expert.
    64V19816,
    Wow why dont you tell us what you reallly thinkabout the Avanti, ha,ha, lol. All jokes aside I appreciate your honesty and let the info fall where you may ! It's always best to know what your up against so there are hopefully no surprises, what you see is what you get. I agree your better off buying a candidate for more $$ that someone else has corrected the known flaws and made it road ready and dependable. The more I hear i'm starting to think twice about jumping in blindfolded.

  35. #35
    President Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wimauma, FL, USA.
    Posts
    658
    If you can and want to do the work, they aren't any worse than any other Stude or most brandX. Depending on what you are looking for, you can get a well sorted driver quality stude in the $20,000 - $30,000 range. The lower end is for basic R1 and the upper for well equiped R2. As I posted earlier, 70s and 80s go for about half that. Assuming my labor is free, I have invested 25,000 - 30,000 in each of my Stude Avantis. The 78, I only got it to run and did not do new interior, paint or any of the expensive stuff.

    FWIW, I have invested a lot more money into the Speedsters.

    As in the case with any old car, you are generally better off buying one that has had most of the work done.
    78 Avanti RQB 2792
    64 Avanti R1 R5408
    63 Avanti R1 R4551
    63 Avanti R1 R2281
    62 GT Hawk V15949
    56 GH 6032504
    56 GH 6032588
    55 Speedster 7160047
    55 Speedster 7165279

  36. #36
    Commander Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Greenville, Illinois
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by 64studeavanti View Post
    If you can and want to do the work, they aren't any worse than any other Stude or most brandX. Depending on what you are looking for, you can get a well sorted driver quality stude in the $20,000 - $30,000 range. The lower end is for basic R1 and the upper for well equiped R2. As I posted earlier, 70s and 80s go for about half that. Assuming my labor is free, I have invested 25,000 - 30,000 in each of my Stude Avantis. The 78, I only got it to run and did not do new interior, paint or any of the expensive stuff.

    FWIW, I have invested a lot more money into the Speedsters.

    As in the case with any old car, you are generally better off buying one that has had most of the work done.
    For true and for sure......You ALWAYS end up with more $$$$ money invested than you planned on. It's like a big can of worms and one thing leads to another and another, etc., etc., etc. I'm sure you have been there more than once and speak from experience, thanks.

  37. #37
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    egg harbor city, nj, .
    Posts
    198
    LOL this is why “Normal” people lease a new Camry! Haha but the Avanti is a sensual experience only matched by watching Ann-Margret in the movie “Tommy”

  38. #38
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Posts
    14,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Gunslinger,
    good info to know and record for possible future use.

    Does anyone on SDC have an Avanti pic that they would share taken from the drivers seat looking out over the hood as if you were driving it. I am curious as to how the hood/scoop/ fender projections might look when driving.
    I've always felt that Avantis are best viewed from the front seats. Here's a couple of '63's I've spent some time with.




    Last edited by mbstude; 02-16-2018 at 09:47 PM.

  39. #39
    Commander Member sailingadventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuhawk View Post
    Sailingadventure,

    Sir, thank you , thank you, thank you. What can I say but "WOW" . I would have been glad to see a pic looking over the hood but a 9 minute video clip, well it almost took me over the edge, lol. That view and the sound of the engine/exhaust going through the gears was music to my ears. I will definitely look at that clip many, many times. It was just like I was the one driving. The "Fender Projections, Hood Scoop and Lazy S Insignia" all combine for a truly fun driving experience. If I may ask what year Avanti is this ?
    Thanks again,
    Tom
    The car is titled as a `64 but has round headlights. The Serial # is R4399, an R2 4speed. I have completely rebuilt or replaced every part on the car as well as adding A/C and real knock off wheels. Here are a couple of pictures of the car.

    DSCN0087.jpg

    Avanti engine.jpg

    DSCN0089.jpg

  40. #40
    President Member Ron Dame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    1,436
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
    Nostalgic Motors in Wixom, MI displayed a new Avanti dash pad that they are manufacturing at the SDC Int'l Meet last summer. The price was $2000.
    -Dwight
    I understand why a complex dash pad for a low demand item would be that expensive, and is the best fix. But I am disappointed there isn't a plastic cap available for a short term improvement
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ

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