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Thread: Eastwood rust eliminators

  1. #1
    President Member Colgate Studebaker's Avatar
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    Eastwood rust eliminators

    Hi guys, I'm looking for info on Eastwoods rust eliminator products. I'm no body man by any means but I am attempting to get my GT Hawk "prepped" for a real body/paint guy. My dilemma is that I am sandblasting (carefully) all the panels and tub to get rid of rust, which isn't hard to accomplish except in the seams and weldments. I've drilled out the spotwelds on some of them and pried the seam up a bit, sandblasted, hammered the seam back down and rewelded, but there are several that can't be done this way. Eastwood has several products to treat rust with and I'd like to know if any of you have used them and how they worked? Any and all thoughts are certainly welcome.
    Thanks Bill Van Alstyne.

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    President Member tsenecal's Avatar
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    I have not used Eastwood Rust products, but have used their frame coatings, gas tank paint, and other products with good luck. I use a Permatex brand rust treatment that has done very well for me. I cleaned and painted the inside of some steel wheels, and the rusty surface turns into a hard black surface. Reading the customer product reviews on Eastwoods site might help you decide.

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    Bill

    If it's rust you are treating then I would think POR15 or the Eastwood products will work. The down side of most good rust encapsulation products is they don't stick to clean metal. That's where I use epoxy primers.

    IAC, I've had good luck with the Eastwood products I've bought so let me recommend you talk to them about your situation before you buy something that might be questionable.

    Bob
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    POR -15 stipulated to use a metal prep. Theirs is called "Metal Ready" but it is primarily Phosphoric Acid. In crevices like you are dealing with I attempt to keep the area saturated with the Phosphoric Acid. This might include temporarily sealing a seam with caulk and then pouring in the solution, or a drip system with a catch pan. The problem with the encapsulator is it needs to stick to the metal. And, If you can't get it in the crevice it is not doing its job. Residual moisture will still continue to rust.

    The hope is that the Phosphoric Acid will neutralize the rust if it sits long enough (hence the saturated sealed seam or drip methods). The other thing I do is thin the encapsulator and with compressed air (try Dust Off in a can, it should be void of moisture) I attempt to blow the product into the seam. WARNING - it can be messy.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    I've used Ospho for over forty years, but it's been around for seventy years. It's a very thin phosphoric acid solution, with the consistency of water, so it goes where you need it to go. It preps clean metal and encapsulates rust, plus it needs no neutralization and it's cheap (I got a gallon the other day at ACE Hardware for less then $20). You remove the heavy rust by sandblasting or wire brushing it, apply with a paint brush, let it dry thoroughly, wash the surface down with Alcohol or acetone and paint it. Take care not to get any on any residual paint because it may lift. I've also used it with a Scuffy pad to scrub off rust from a lightly rusted surface.

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    President Member wdills's Avatar
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    Ospho or any other phosphoric acid treatment will convert the rust into a hard black oxide. Any of these products will probably be your best bet as far as seeping down into the seam. Once the acid does its job, you could sand blast the area again to be sure the area has good tooth and then apply POR-15 to seal the seam, top and bottom to ensure moisture and air can't get in there any more.

    POR-15 won't stick to slick new metal. Their metal prep is basically an acid etch to give the metal some tooth for the POR-15 to stick to. Sand blasted metal like you have is plenty rough for POR-15 to stick to.
    Wayne
    "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

    ‚Äč

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    Another vote for POR-15. I've used it for many years and have never had any complaint. I even covered a very rusty and rust prone part on my manure spreader and it has held up well for several years. When it tacks off just give it a light shot of Rustoleum rattle can auto primer and you should get paint to stick when fully cured. It is super hard when dry so it is very hard to sand to a paintable surface.

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    I have used POR-15 several times over the last twenty+ years. It is a good product if it is use as intended, to encapsulate rust, and when you can't or won't be able to clean the item properly. I have a couple of cautions that I think are worth noting. First, it is not a primer, and has real limitations, to later deciding to apply a regular paint topcoat. Second, UV exposure is a killer to this product. It says that right on the container, ignoring this caution will have real consequences! Please don't ask me how I know this, but I do. Third, don't expect to remove this stuff, when you have decided that you screwed up, and have used it improperly. It will resist all of your efforts at removal, regardless of how deteriorated it has become. Forth, purchase only enough for your project. Even if you are lucky enough to save the unused portion, after long term storage, you will still have to break into the can to retrieve it. The can lid will remain permanently sealed to the can.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallabutt View Post
    I have used POR-15 several times over the last twenty+ years. It is a good product if it is use as intended, to encapsulate rust, and when you can't or won't be able to clean the item properly. I have a couple of cautions that I think are worth noting. First, it is not a primer, and has real limitations, to later deciding to apply a regular paint topcoat. Second, UV exposure is a killer to this product. It says that right on the container, ignoring this caution will have real consequences! Please don't ask me how I know this, but I do. Third, don't expect to remove this stuff, when you have decided that you screwed up, and have used it improperly. It will resist all of your efforts at removal, regardless of how deteriorated it has become. Forth, purchase only enough for your project. Even if you are lucky enough to save the unused portion, after long term storage, you will still have to break into the can to retrieve it. The can lid will remain permanently sealed to the can.
    I'll add a couple of things to what I agree with in the quote. I buy the quart size but the first time I open it (preferably on a day lacking humidity) I divided the contents up into smaller plastic containers. The vitamin containers that are about the size of one's fist are good, but a few smaller containers are also helpful. I fill them to the crowning level and then screw the top on to keep air out. That said I still typically get a small amount that crusts over eventually. Once completed I put the containers in a plastic bag and draw the air out and then use a tight twist tie. Finally I put that in the refrigerator as the temp and lack of humidity seem to help preserve the contents. I've gone back 2-3 years later and still used the POR-15. You can also buy it in a small container 6 pack, but the cost per ounce is not good.

    Regarding the painting over, they make a product called Tie Coat Primer that is suppose to allow one to apply that and then paint over the POR-15. They also state that one CAN paint directly to the POR-15 with paint or primer BUT it must be done within a certain window that can be hard to determine. The window is hard to judge because POR-15 cures by moisture in the air and I've seen it take 45 minutes and I've seen it seemingly take 8 hours.

    As to removal I have gotten it off with a stiff rotary wire brush in an angle grinder. The product (when thick) drys like a hard rubber not unlike the rubber in a Super Ball. So, it can take some effort to remove because the surface is abrasion resistant.
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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