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Thread: Travel in British Columbia in simpler times.

  1. #1
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    Travel in British Columbia in simpler times.

    I counted 7 Studebakers but probably missed some. Of particular note is the large number of English cars due to British Columbia being in Canada hence a Commonwealth nation with ties to England. The 1960's picture of the Quilchena Hotel is where my Avanti picture was shown a couple of years ago on IDYSD.
    Enjoy, Bill


  2. #2
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    I only looked at the first page. I only spotted one Studebaker out of all of those cars. Perhaps I need a bigger screen/enlarge and/or more time. I was surprised at the high number of Mercurys/Meteors.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    I only looked at the first page. I only spotted one Studebaker out of all of those cars. Perhaps I need a bigger screen/enlarge and/or more time. I was surprised at the high number of Mercurys/Meteors.
    The Meteors were a Canadian only model and were very popular when I was young, in the late 50's-60's. Also note the high number of Pontiacs. The Canadian only version outsold Chevrolet a few years.
    The British cars were everywhere in Canada. Vauxhall, Anglia, Ford Consul,Zephyr,etc. By 1970 the majority were all rusted away in Eastern Canada.
    We had a few Studebakers in our family, mostly in Ontario. Especially around the Hamilton-Brantford area. The Nova Scotia salt air claimed many of them prematurely.

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    I'm guessing that the Manahut Chalet has survived and is the one pictured remodeled, as the Moon Water.

    I remember Vancouver in the early 50's. Although it was only a few hours from Seattle it was really a different place. As a ten year old I was already steeped in the car culture. To see the British cars everywhere seemed really strange. A two day, weekend trip had it's drawbacks, because of the "blue laws," virtually nothing was open on Sundays. Later as a young adult, the fact that a woman had to be accompanied by a male to go into one of the hotels, that served beer, really put a crimp in meeting a girl. There was another entrance for unaccompanied ladies. I really can't remember how we got around the problem, but we did. Today the differences north of the boarder are almost nonexistent.

  5. #5
    President Member ndynis's Avatar
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    Great photos and countryside views! Really glad I'm not driving either the bus or the dump truck in that one picture of them both squeezing through a gap.
    Thanks for posting. Maybe some of us will get to see some of this area before or after the International in 2018.
    Nick

  6. #6
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    Thanks for your comments Nick. As an aside, my family moved to Vancouver from the prairies in 1958 (right after the famous Second Narrows Bridge collapse as we saw it from the railway bridge we had to use to cross the inlet). The bus & dump passing was in the Fraser Canyon section of our cross country main road called the Trans Canada Highway. We travelled it to reach Vancouver and it was so scary that at one point we had to back up 1/4 mile to allow an oncoming(eastbound) truck to pass. And yes everyone, we were driving a 1956 Commander 4 door sedan, 289 4BBL stick! I'll never forget the trip. Also in those pics it is shown the Big Bend section of the Trans Canada. If you Google Map it, it was from Golden to Revelstoke before the highway bypassed that long, dusty gravel section. Whenever Dad saw the dust from an oncoming vehicle he called for all the windows to be rolled up. Once we reached Revelstoke(a very long days' drive) it was showers for everyone including our pup.
    Times have definitely changed.
    Bill

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