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Thread: First vintage truck... a Studebaker

  1. #1
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    First vintage truck... a Studebaker

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    I just bought a wonderful, all-original 1951 2R pickup with no rust on it. This is my very first vintage vehicle, something I have wanted for many, many years~! Aside from putting radial tires on it and fixing the lights, it needs very little.

    My plan is to fix it up to 'almost new' condition with original parts and colors, etc. It would like to have the body taken off and do the frames and all.

    Where would the experts-- all you guys who I admire and who have done this many times before-- recommend that I start with having my truck repainted? I will have to have this done because my body shop skills are nil. What would I expect to pay for a top-notch paint job? Who would you recommend to do this in the greater Cincinnati/Dayton/Columbus area?

    Finally, what carburetor can I put on a 2R (3 speed, no overdrive) for smoother engine function?

    Thank you,

    Mark
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    President Member RadioRoy's Avatar
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    Congrats on your new toy and welcome to the forum.
    Personally, I would do all the mechanical work first and then paint the truck. If you paint the truck first, then scratch it while doing the mechanical work... you will have a scratched truck.

    Fix or replace the original carburetor. Add an overdrive if you can find one.

    You do not need to redesign this truck to make it operational, just bring it up to original specification.

    Here is my best advice in no particular order.

    -buy the shop manual, the chassis parts catalog and the body parts catalog. They show all the parts, what their correct name is and the part number. Studebaker vendors use these part numbers to assure that you get the correct parts.

    http://studebakervendors.com/

    -Start slowly, learn your vehicle. Get it stopping and running, drive it and fix the little things that need to be fixed as you learn.

    -For some reason, replacing systems with parts from other brands of cars seems to be the first thing that comes to mind for a new-to-Studebaker owner. But the vehicle does not need to be re-designed with parts from another brand. If you bring everything up to specification, re-bush the bushings and so on, you will have a reliable, well running and well driving vehicle. Studebaker engineers were professionals who knew what they were doing.

    -do not take the vehicle apart. It's the thing that everyone seems to think of, BUT... It is one hundred times easier to take something apart than it is to put it back together. Leave the ground up restorations to the pros with the tools, knowledge and money to complete the task.

    -Whenever you do disassemble something, do it with the idea in mind that you have to put it back together again. If you disassemble something, lay the parts out in the order they came off. Then, put them back on in the same order. That alone will save you lots of grief.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

  3. #3
    Silver Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Great advice from Roy (experience). Easiest way I know to end up with a "parts" truck, is to take it apart. I love your enthusiasm. But, don't allow the enthusiasm to rush you into trouble. Take your time, gather some materials, but just as important, MAKE SOME FRIENDS. In your region, there are fellow Studebaker enthusiasts that you would be wise to seek their council. However, you know what you want, like, and only you can develop a plan that works for you. There has become a big trend in what folks call the "SURVIVOR" look, especially for pick up trucks. From the picture you posted, your's seems like a great survivor look candidate.

    First thing I would recommend for you is to buy copies of the factory manuals, shop, body & chassis, so you have proper procedures for working on the truck, and part names & numbers for ordering parts. Look for an overdrive transmission, and if you find one on a "parts" truck, try to get the drive shaft, cables, kick down switch, accelerator linkage, etc., at the same time. Carburetors, and carburetor rebuild services can be found. Main thing is don't get in a rush. Learn the components, gather knowledge, and develop a plan. In my opinion, Studebaker trucks are among the most durable, simple, and "honest" vehicles they ever made. Once you accept these vehicles as the basic utilitarian vehicles as they were designed, you can have years of enjoyable ownership. Best wishes for you and welcome to our group.
    John Clary
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    I'd suggest getting all mechanicals in top shape. Have generator, starter checked out. rebuild complete brake system including hard lines, flex lines and shoes. As Roy said, if it doesn't have overdrive trans, they're out there. Will make it more drivable speed wise. all electrical, gauges. Then I'd drive it for awhile. Get very familiar with it so you know every squeak and groan. You'll learn more about it by driving it and will help you decide how far you want to go in the restoration. Pic shows a nice looking truck. Enjoy da drive.
    Kim

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    Thanks for the input and sage advice guys. I'm eager to hear what others have to say. I like the 'take it slow-and-easy' advice and the concept of a survivor truck. This fits my ideas and my timeline )and budget) well.

  6. #6
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    Welcome to the SDC Forum and the wonderful world of Studebakers! Join the Studebaker Drivers Club (from this site).

    I would concentrate on safety and reliability items first.

    I would not paint that truck. For one thing, repainted no would know what a rust free original it is.

    I am confused. Your location states "New Hampshire", yet you are looking for shops in Ohio.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  7. #7
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    RadioRoy nailed it. I learned years ago to not rush into a project and take it all apart. Keep it drivable as you fix one thing at a time. If you want to restore the generator, then do it one weekend and put it back on. Do the same with the starter, brakes, carb, etc. Keep it drivable, so you don't wind up with a parts pile that never gets put back together. That truck looks so good as a nice survivor, that I wouldn't repaint it.

  8. #8
    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    I'll add my welcome to you here, Mark. I own an original Studebaker truck and I love it. In fact, it is my "rock". Whenever I need a dependable, solid, reliable, (and good looking) truck for travel or work I climb in to my Champ. I fix things as they need it, and make improvements as I have the money, with original parts. These machines, if maintained, are just as good today as they were when new, and a heck of a lot more fun to drive than a new truck, in my opinion. Take it slow as advised above. Learn about your truck and how it was built, fix it up over time and just enjoy it.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

  9. #9
    President Member Ron Dame's Avatar
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    I was going to put my two cents in, but everyone beat me to it. Even if you had a frame off restoration done,would you enjoy it as much, or always be afraid of that dreaded first scratch? Congrats, on your new purchase, do what the above mention, and start enjoying the truck.
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ

  10. #10
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    I can't add any wisdom to the excellent responses above. But I will reinforce the recommendation to purchase a copy of the 2R shop manual and the 49-56 truck parts book (contains both body and chassis) before you embark on anything major. Original copies come up for sale regularly on eBay and copies, both paper and on CD, are available from many of the vendors mentioned by Roy in post #2. There are some originals listed on eBay right now:

    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...ts&_sacat=6000

    Edit: here's a raggedy but apparently complete parts book for sale cheap:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Stu...haNE1V&vxp=mtr

    Some history on 2R-series trucks here:
    http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...uckHistory.asp

    Good luck with your truck.
    Last edited by Skip Lackie; 12-24-2017 at 07:24 AM. Reason: typo

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander Eddie View Post
    I'll add my welcome to you here, Mark. I own an original Studebaker truck and I love it. In fact, it is my "rock". Whenever I need a dependable, solid, reliable, (and good looking) truck for travel or work I climb in to my Champ. I fix things as they need it, and make improvements as I have the money, with original parts. These machines, if maintained, are just as good today as they were when new, and a heck of a lot more fun to drive than a new truck, in my opinion. Take it slow as advised above. Learn about your truck and how it was built, fix it up over time and just enjoy it.
    This reminds me of a friend with a tired looking, but reliable, Studebaker pickup. One day, he had it parked in front of the Mercedes-Benz dealership. They asked him to move it. He explained that it wouldn't be there if his 'Benz was running. He was at the dealership in his trusty Studebaker to get parts to make his 'Benz run. And, no, he didn't move it until he was ready to leave.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  12. #12
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    This is all great advice and it's good to see that it's consistent advice, too. Interestingly, one of the first things I did was order a shop manual from eBay. Next on my list is getting five 235x85x16 radials to replace the 6.50 x 16LT bias ply tires that are on the truck. And of course I need to figure out how to wire the lights (though it may just be a switch or a relay?)

    The truck runs OK and the carb was just rebuilt, But I would like to 'smooth it out' because it doesn't high-idle so well. Maybe just replace the carb?

    I'd also like to have an overdrive transmission installed as you guys suggested but I have no idea what this involves and what it costs to have it done once I locate one. Consider it on the to-do list.

    Three final questions for the experts:

    Did this model 2r come equipped with a horn?

    Can a Studebaker stock spin-on oil filter be added?

    When I charge a positive ground 6 volt battery do I connect 'red-to-red'? Or do I put the negative battery charging clamp (black) on the positive (red) battery ground terminal? Dumb, I know. But better to ask.


    To StudeGary:

    We have a home in New Hampshire and we own a farm and some hunting land in Ohio. My truck is in Ohio. Anyone there from southwestern Ohio...?

    Thanks, guys

  13. #13
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    Yes, it came with a horn.
    A spin on filter can be adapted to it, but it would still be partial flow. It would not be worth the time and expense to replace a cartridge unit. Or, do you not have any filter now?
    When you charge, keep positive to positive (red) and negative to negative (black). Be sure the charger is set for 6 volts (some new chargers are only 12 volts).
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  14. #14
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    What Gary said. 2R trucks came standard with a single horn. Dual, more modern-sounding horns were optional. The single horns are not that hard to find -- I might even have one that works. The correct dual horns are more difficult to find.

    The optional oil filter was the cartridge type. The filters are still readily available.

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    Paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    What Gary said. 2R trucks came standard with a single horn. Dual, more modern-sounding horns were optional. The single horns are not that hard to find -- I might even have one that works. The correct dual horns are more difficult to find.
    cart
    The optional oil filter was the cartridge type. The filters are still readily available.

    Skip Lackie,

    There seems to be nothing on the engine to put the filter cartridge in. The engine/case looks like the one in the attached photo (not my engine.)

    I would be interested in trying (or buying?) the horn you might have. Let me look and see what's there and what isn't for a horn mechanism. I assume the horn button is in the middle of the steering wheel?
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Guys,

    So 'overdrive' is a road-speed gear, right? Lowers the engine RPM and allows you to drive faster on the road?

  17. #17
    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkibler View Post
    .
    Guys,

    So 'overdrive' is a road-speed gear, right? Lowers the engine RPM and allows you to drive faster on the road?
    Mark, yes. That is basically correct. It lowers your RPMs about 30 percent. Even with 427 gears in the read end of my truck I can tool down the highway at 65 MPH with no problem.
    Also a word on the tires you are buying. With 235s you may need to use tubes as they may be a bit wide for your rims. I know that finding narrower tires for 16" rims is difficult but I think you may be able to find 215s that will work without tubes.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

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    Commander Eddie,

    So do you suggest 215 x 85 x 16 tires as being the closest in size to 6.50 x 16 LT's? Are they closer than 235 x 85's?

    Thanks,

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkibler View Post
    Skip Lackie,

    There seems to be nothing on the engine to put the filter cartridge in. The engine/case looks like the one in the attached photo (not my engine.)

    I would be interested in trying (or buying?) the horn you might have. Let me look and see what's there and what isn't for a horn mechanism. I assume the horn button is in the middle of the steering wheel?
    Not Skip - Studebakers, and many other vehicles of that era, had an oil filter as an option. The Production Order, as well as looking at the engine, will tell you if it came with or has one. An original type can be added to your engine. If your pickup has gone this far without one, I would say to just leave it alone and change your oil frequently.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  20. #20
    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkibler View Post
    Commander Eddie,

    So do you suggest 215 x 85 x 16 tires as being the closest in size to 6.50 x 16 LT's? Are they closer than 235 x 85's?

    Thanks,

    Mark
    Yes. If you buy tires from Lucas, Coker, and the like you can find the exact size, but they are more expensive. If you buy from a modern supplier the 215 x 85 x 16, or even 215 x 75 x 16 will get you close enough that tubes are not needed. I have 16" wheels on my truck and those were the closest tire sizes I could find.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

  21. #21
    Golden Hawk Member StudeRich's Avatar
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    Very Nice looking Truck!
    From this I can see that you have a 2R5 NOT a 2R6.

    This is info you will need because, there will be a BIG difference when ordering Engine and Trans Parts from the 2R5, Small 169 Champion Six to the 2R6, 245 Commander Six!
    Not to mention the different needs for proper Gearing for Today's Highways and Interstates.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner




  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkibler View Post
    Skip Lackie,

    There seems to be nothing on the engine to put the filter cartridge in. The engine/case looks like the one in the attached photo (not my engine.)

    I would be interested in trying (or buying?) the horn you might have. Let me look and see what's there and what isn't for a horn mechanism. I assume the horn button is in the middle of the steering wheel?
    The single horn was mounted on the front driver's (left) side of the radiator mount, just below the holes/grommets where the headlamp wiring goes through. The horn mount had two holes two inches apart. The optional second horn would have been mounted in the same position on the right side. The optional oil filter would have been mounted on the driver's side of the block, in front of the distributor. It would have been bolted to the head with two bolts. A used unit would not be hard to find, but I agree with Gary -- if the truck never had one, you'd be better off just changing the oil every 1000-2000 miles.

    If your wheels are the originals, they were not designed for tubeless tires, and tubes may be required. Also, remember that your OEM 6.50 x 16 tires equate roughly to 165-85x16, a size that is not common. I would be careful about over-stressing your wheels with oversize radial tires. Dunno what your budget is, but the original bias-ply tires are still available from companies like Universal and Coker. If you're gonna do most of your driving at moderate speeds around town, bias-ply tires may be a better choice and would look more "correct".
    Last edited by Skip Lackie; 12-26-2017 at 03:50 PM.

  23. #23
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    This is really helpful information about the correct tire sizes and the horn placement. Thanks guys. I'm considering radials only for a smoother ride.

    So the horn button is beneath the center of the steering wheel then...? As I understand it;s wired to the horn relay and then to the horn itself, with a power feed and a ground along the way.
    .
    .
    OK, good news... I think~! There's a black knob on the dash with the white letters 'OD' on it. Hmmmm. What could this be? Over Draft protection for my checking account? On Demand wifi system (no, they didn't have that back in '51.) Guys, I think I have overdrive already installed~! As I understand, all I have to do to engage overdrive is get into third gear and then pull the OD knob. Is that correct? I'm sorta scared to try it for fear that when I do, nuts and bolts will come shooting out of the gear box and my truck will come to a grinding and expensive halt. But I'm sure excited that it's there and I'm to try it. Can you offer suggestions before I do so that I don't cause any mechanical damage? Also, how do I disengage overdrive? Just push the OD knob back in?

  24. #24
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    The OD is the overdrive handle, and it must be pushed in for the car to be able to go into overdrive after you reach about 33 MPH. When up to 33 or faster, with the knob pushed in, just let off the gas and the overdrive will engage. Never try to pull the OD handle out while moving, unless the tranny is out of overdrive and the engine is pulling the car. In other words, if you are doing less than 33, so the overdrive isn't engaged, just slightly push on the gas so the engine is pulling, then pull the handle out. If you are driving in overdrive and want to pull the handle out, to lock it out of overdrive, then floor the throttle, which will kick the tranny out of overdrive, and as soon as the engine speeds up and is still pulling the car, then you can pull the handle out.

    The horn button will send the ground to the horn relay, which makes the relay contact close and send voltage to the horn. So, on the relay, one terminal goes to the horn button for grounding, one terminal is full time voltage, and the third terminal sends voltage to the horn when the contacts close.

  25. #25
    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    I have to agree with what has been said. Unless that truck has some body issues that don't show in the pictures, it really doesn't need paint. I see what appears to be some rust in the door so there may be other problems like in the cab corners and steps, but they can wait until the truck is running and driving well. A slightly used original is always popular with people.
    Do you have any more pictures? We love pictures.


    "In the heart of Arkansas."
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    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.

  26. #26
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    Before doing anything, completely rebuild the brakes. A brake failure will ruin your whole day as well as the truck's. If you are paying to have everything done, slow down and plan what you really want. At $100 per hour labor the price escalates fast. Most of the respondents to your original question are assuming you have the skill and tools to do all this yourself. If that is not the case, be practical and plan your efforts so this does not turn into a garage/yard ornament. The best way to add overdrive is to find a complete setup from a parts truck. The South Bend may swap meet or various online part sites are a good place to start looking.
    james r pepper

  27. #27
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    Or you could just skip all the bother and sell it to me for what you paid, load it on a transport headed to Elko, NV. and I will deal with the head ache. Just kidding. It sounds like you will enjoy working on it, as well as driving it. Just take it slow, and do your research as you go along, so you know what you're getting into. I learned a few things from this forum that I should have known BEFORE I tackled the job. Enjoy your truck!

  28. #28
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    Nothing like talking about old Studebaker trucks here on Christmas eve!

    Lots of good advice here. I have owned my 2R-5 for over two decades. Great truck and easy to work on. It looks like your truck might be midnight blue, same color as mine. I am also including a photo of my truck's engine where you can see where the original oil filter mounts.
    photos downloaded 6 18 15 048.jpg001.jpg

    As others have stated overdrive is a great thing to add to your truck if you don't already have it. Your truck most likely has a 4:88 rear axle, which will limit your enjoyment of the truck. I am fortunate, as my truck came factory equipped with overdrive, as well as the oil filter and Climatizer.
    If you have any questions, ask them here, or feel free to PM me directly if you wish.
    Eric DeRosa

    \'49 2R-5 (original Survivor)
    \'63 R2 Lark (the moneypit-mobile)

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2R2 View Post
    Nothing like talking about old Studebaker trucks here on Christmas eve!

    Lots of good advice here. I have owned my 2R-5 for over two decades. Great truck and easy to work on. It looks like your truck might be midnight blue, same color as mine. I am also including a photo of my truck's engine where you can see where the original oil filter mounts.
    photos downloaded 6 18 15 048.jpg001.jpg

    As others have stated overdrive is a great thing to add to your truck if you don't already have it. Your truck most likely has a 4:88 rear axle, which will limit your enjoyment of the truck. I am fortunate, as my truck came factory equipped with overdrive, as well as the oil filter and Climatizer.
    If you have any questions, ask them here, or feel free to PM me directly if you wish.

    Eric,

    Merry Christmas. Always a great day to talk about old trucks.

    Thanks for photos of your beautiful truck. It's the same truck and the same color as mine and it's in the condition where I want mine to be. Does it have a (original) rear bumper? I'd love to see more photos and I sure would like to get together sometime. What suggestions can you offer me as I begin to work on her? What should I know about the 2R5 model?

    Mark

  30. #30
    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard, Mark That's a fine-looking truck you have.

    I cannot improve on all the excellent advice you're received here, and it sounds like you plan to heed it. Good!

    Join The Studebaker Drivers Club right away. You'll enjoy Turning Wheels as there is 'nearly always something "truck" in every issue...and "for sure" there are parts vendors with truck parts in every issue. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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  31. #31
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    Hi
    It's Christmas morning , about 6:30 here in lower Alabama , so MERRY CHRISTMAS every one . In regards to your overdrive tranny and proper operation , get with some one locally with overdrive in their vehicle ( it really doesn't matter what brand vehicle ) and let them instruct you on how to operate it . Maybe let them take you for a drive to show you how to use it . It may save you a good deal of time and possible damage to your O.D. unit . Please make sure your brakes are in good shape as the darn thing " FREE WHEELS " in overdrive and engine braking may not be available in some situations .
    I have several vehicles with O.D. and prefer O.D. in all my " STUFF "
    I have a 47 M16 which doesn't have O.D. but wish but wish it did . I also have a 52 Champion with overdrive and enjoy driving it . Also several Kaiser Frazer products .

    I don't post much here , but read the forum everyday for years now and enjoy reading the post like this one .

  32. #32
    Golden Hawk Member BobPalma's Avatar
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    What Michael said in Post #31; have someone "demo" a working overdrive unit in any car or truck of the era to more easily understand how it works.

    Important is this: Until you fully understand what you're doing, do NOT push or pull the overdrive knob in or out while the truck is in motion.

    It can be safely done either way under the right circumstances but can cause a lot of damage under the wrong circumstances.

    And Merry Christmas to all this Christmas morning. (The Nashville TN parade is on TV and quite the event if you have no children or grandchildren in the house opening presents.) BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

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  33. #33
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    To summarize: The original question was about paint. Fix any paint problems LAST. Make sure the truck runs and stops before worrying about paint. While doing the important stuff, the small stuff like the lack of a horn can be addressed as time and parts permit.

    Slight correction to TWChamp's post #24: the original single horn in trucks "floated" electrically. The horn button completed the ground circuit to the horn. The hot side of the horn was hot all the time. There was no relay. The optional dual horn kit included a relay and was wired the way TWChamp stated.

    The 2R5 models differ very little mechanically from the 3R5 models or the E5 models that succeeded them. They are rugged and simple and easy to work on. The mechanical parts are all available. The principal differences among Studebaker truck models are discussed in the Stude truck history referenced above.

    The 2R truck owners manual includes a very good discussion of overdrive operation. Reprinted copies are available from SI.

  34. #34
    President Member Ron Dame's Avatar
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    Agreed. After getting an idea of the overall mechanical condition of any car, I rebuild the brakes. Not going is disappointing, not stopping is deadly. Next comes suspension and steering, then engine/trans/diff. Otherwise It's too tempting to drive an unsafe vehicle.


    Quote Originally Posted by jpepper View Post
    Before doing anything, completely rebuild the brakes. A brake failure will ruin your whole day as well as the truck's. If you are paying to have everything done, slow down and plan what you really want. At $100 per hour labor the price escalates fast. Most of the respondents to your original question are assuming you have the skill and tools to do all this yourself. If that is not the case, be practical and plan your efforts so this does not turn into a garage/yard ornament. The best way to add overdrive is to find a complete setup from a parts truck. The South Bend may swap meet or various online part sites are a good place to start looking.
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ

  35. #35
    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    "I have a 47 M16 which doesn't have O.D. but wish but wish it did ."

    I have a 1946 M16 in excellent original condition. My thought is that none of the big trucks had overdrive available. Is it even possible to install an overdrive on one?

  36. #36
    Speedster Member
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    Most heavy trucks from that era had an optional two speed rear axle, but I do not know whether Studebaker offered one. My M15A is four speed manual, with no two speed axle. Larger trucks yet, had a three or four speed Browning auxiliary transmission behind the main box.

  37. #37
    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsenecal View Post
    Most heavy trucks from that era had an optional two speed rear axle, but I do not know whether Studebaker offered one. My M15A is four speed manual, with no two speed axle. Larger trucks yet, had a three or four speed Browning auxiliary transmission behind the main box.
    Yes, Studebaker did offer this option. They were common on their military trucks during WWII. Many of the heavy trucks for civilian use also came with the two speed rear axle.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

  38. #38
    Commander Member
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    Paint

    .
    Eric DeRosa and friends -

    Did the 2R-5 originally come with a rear view mirror mounted in the middle, inside of the windshield? I see one in some 2R-5 photos but not in others. If so, how did it mount?

    Does anyone out there have a mirror like this for sale? My first genuine addition to “my girl.”

    PS, I very much appreciate all the wise and wonderful advice everyone is giving and I really do look forward to reading more. I hope to meet all you guys sometime..

    Merry Christmas,
    Mark and his blue ‘51 truck

  39. #39
    Silver Hawk Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander Eddie View Post
    Yes, Studebaker did offer this option. They were common on their military trucks during WWII. Many of the heavy trucks for civilian use also came with the two speed rear axle.
    Yes, many 1.5 and 2-ton Stude trucks came equipped with 2-speed rear axles, but the ratios were low and very low -- they were designed to improve low speed lugging, not high speed operation. As tsenecal said, the only option is the addition of a Browning or other make auxiliary transmission. Relatively expensive.

  40. #40
    Silver Hawk Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkibler View Post
    .
    Eric DeRosa and friends -

    Did the 2R-5 originally come with a rear view mirror mounted in the middle, inside of the windshield? I see one in some 2R-5 photos but not in others. If so, how did it mount?

    Does anyone out there have a mirror like this for sale? My first genuine addition to “my girl.”

    PS, I very much appreciate all the wise and wonderful advice everyone is giving and I really do look forward to reading more. I hope to meet all you guys sometime..

    Merry Christmas,
    Mark and his blue ‘51 truck
    The 2R trucks came with a driver's side outside mirror. The right side outside mirror and inside mirror were optional and relatively rare. The inside mirror itself is the same one as used on late 1940s Stude cars and is fairly easy to find. What is hard to find is the bracket that screws to the inside windshield moulding of the trucks. The individual parts are described in the truck parts book. Complete 2R truck mirror assemblies come up on eBay occasionally. Sometimes the availability of rare parts are posted on the Stude Truck Talk forum:
    http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885

    Edit/add: Both outside rear view mirror assemblies have been reproduced by SI.
    Last edited by Skip Lackie; 12-26-2017 at 04:24 PM.

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