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Thread: (opinion) Can Millenials Save The (Studebaker) Hobby?

  1. #1
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    (opinion) Can Millenials Save The (Studebaker) Hobby?

    According to this NYT writer, maybe.... (I think he's full of it <lol>)

    https://journal.classiccars.com/2017...-car-industry/

    (Snippet copy - See link for entire article)

    Larry Edall, editor...wrote:
    Between traveling and work and other responsibilities, including an eight-day babysit of three grandchildren, it sometimes takes me a few days — OK, sometimes a couple of weeks — to get around to working my way through the Sunday edition of The New York Times (yes, I’m an old codger who actually likes to get printer’s ink on his hands as he reads his news).
    But I’ve finally read David Sax’s mid-November essay, “Our Love Affair With Digital Is Over.” The subhead on the article is “Many of us are yearning for records, real books, and hardware stores,” to which I suggest we can add cars that you not only drive yourself but that need some tender-loving care from time to time, perhaps even some carburetor adjustment or re-setting of the ignition points (remember those?).
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

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    Silver Hawk Member bezhawk's Avatar
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    Perhaps if they had the opportunities that their parents had, then yes they might be able to save, and invest in a hobby. It will slowly die out with the boomers save for a few.
    Bez Auto Alchemy
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    Quote Originally Posted by 52-fan View Post
    I don't worry about the future of my hobby. Of course, I have a attachment to Studebakers, but in the end it is all just stuff. This same question comes up on model builders forums. What will happen to my finely built models when I am gone? The real answer is that you won't care. They will go the way of an earlier person's carriage collection.
    I agree. I sometimes think about my "stuff". If I need the money, I could sell some of it. Of course, I could spend the money, the key word is "need".
    I have sold off almost all of my hard parts. I have mostly paper (literature, books, manuals, magazines, etc.). I have three rooms full. It is most heavy in Studebaker with Chrysler products second and about everything else third. I don't have the amount of Studebaker stuff that Richard Quinn and perhaps a couple of others have, but I have a lot of Brand X that I am pretty sure that they do not have.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    "A '71 Hemi Barracuda crossed the auction block today... but received no bids despite having no reserve. Meanwhile..., an early edition Prius (build #2) sold for a record 67 Bit Coin."


    ​How many of us have a garage full of Buggies because our grandfather's encouraged us to keep the hobby going?
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-69 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    Silver Hawk Member Guido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Dateline: Scottsdale, AZ - January, 2030.

    "A '71 Hemi Barracuda crossed the auction block today... but received no bids despite having no reserve. Meanwhile..., an early edition Prius (build #2) sold for a record 67 Bit Coin."


    ​How many of us have a garage full of Buggies because our grandfather's encouraged us to keep the hobby going?
    My last grandfather died in 1966, despite being a medical doctor and obtaining the rank of Colonel for his service in WWI and WWII he never learned to drive. Having been born in 1880 I presume he navigated a buggy at some point in his life. He never spoke to me about collecting anything...
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    I have met very few millenials who are interested in any old car, let alone a Studebaker. There's for sure some interest, but not the level we boomers are accustomed too. Old cars are expensive to maintain and store for young people that never grew up involved with them. Also, the sheer number of cars available to an ever shrinking audience vieing for them will be the final arbitor. Supply and demand has always been the key!

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    I hope at least the collector cars of today end up in a dry climate storage , Similar to how they store old aircraft , You could take a tour bus to view them for 1/4 bitcoin , Ed

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    President Member Gunslinger's Avatar
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    If it doesn't drive itself and be equipped with Bluetooth or it can't be operated by their smartphone, I can't see too many millennials being interested in old cars. Of course, that's the spoiled, self-absorbed millennials we hear about in the media. There's plenty of hard-working, unselfish young people we simply don't hear about because they're too busy getting ahead in life...they'll have hobbies and cars will be one of them. After all...vinyl LP's are making a comeback as are instant cameras similar to Polaroids. I think old cars will ok.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    President Member Commander Eddie's Avatar
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    I think the answer to the question is difficult to answer. I will tell you this, however. There is a young man here in my town who I met at a local car show a number of years ago when he was 14 years old. He came over to talk to me because he saw I brought a Studebaker. He asked lots of good questions and then let me know that his grandfather was leaving him a 1922 Studebaker in his will. He showed me some photos of the car and I was surprised to see a car in such good condition.
    He finally got the car a little over a year ago and drove it to the same show where we had met years before. His car was extremely nice and in original condition. He took home an award that day. He was beaming!
    A few months later I went over to his parents house to see the car and discovered it had come with lots of spare parts including a spare engine.
    As it turns out he is going to college at McPherson in Kansas with a business major and auto restoration minor and plans to come back here and open a restoration shop. He is an excited Studebaker owner and has joined the club. So, there is one little ray of hope for our marque's future.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

  10. #10
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post


    How many of us have a garage full of Buggies because our grandfather's encouraged us to keep the hobby going?
    That's it in a nutshell.

    Most of us don't want the same cars our parents lusted after...in fact we have few (if any) of the same hobbies or leisure time activities. Why do we want, or expect (or insist) that young people today do as we didn't do?
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    President Member DougHolverson's Avatar
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    Now I'm feeling sad thinking about all those old Studebakers going to the boneyard.

    OTOH, is this all this new? I'm a late Boomer, child of the '70s, Class of '79, and I swear that I was the lonely only one inthralled with Studebakers. A forgotten company that closed shop right before kindergarten. Most of the rest of my age didn't care because it wasn't some new Trans Am, Camaro, or something like that.

    Stipulate only sell to a good home in your wills....
    1963 Champ "Daisy Stu Bludebaker"- sometimes driver
    1957 Silver Hawk "Josie"- picking up the pieces after an unreliable body man let it rot for 11 years from an almost driver to a basket case
    1951 Commander Starlight "Dale"- basket case, next project after the Hawk
    1947 Champion "Sally"- basket case
    1941 Commander Land Cruiser "Ursula"- basket case

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    OK, I give up..........so what's a "bitcoin"?

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    President Member DougHolverson's Avatar
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    It's a made up currency for doing business across the Internet. It's worth whatever the investors and speculators think it's worth at the given time.
    1963 Champ "Daisy Stu Bludebaker"- sometimes driver
    1957 Silver Hawk "Josie"- picking up the pieces after an unreliable body man let it rot for 11 years from an almost driver to a basket case
    1951 Commander Starlight "Dale"- basket case, next project after the Hawk
    1947 Champion "Sally"- basket case
    1941 Commander Land Cruiser "Ursula"- basket case

  14. #14
    Silver Hawk Member JRoberts's Avatar
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    Maybe I am just not too smart, but why oh why must we constantly go through this discussion about what is going to happen to Studebakerdom (or any other given "dom") when the baby boomers die out? Are we any better than the generations that follow us. No. Are we less lazy than the generations that follow us? Certainly not. The generations maybe different from one another, approach life differently than each other and even be interested in different things than each other. Why the negativity concerning any generation that follows the Baby Boomer generation? I just cannot figure it out. I have two kids, both adults with kids of their own. I think they are pretty typical of their generation and I don't see the doomsday situation that many seem to have when it comes to the the two generations that follow ours. I just don't understand......... But I do know one thing, this negativity toward the generations that follow ours is what is threatening those generations' interested in our beloved Studebakers and other classic cars as well.
    Joe Roberts
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    '65 Cruiser
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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    I started out very young hanging out at a two bay shop down the street from my parent's house . At that time it was known as Gene's auto body .. He specialized in corvettes but there was always lots of really cool hot rods and gassers coming and going , this would be 1971 - 74 . His name is Gene Townsend he is well known for corvette restoration and painted many hot rods around So Cal in the day. He was always nice to me and showed me what he and his guys were doing. After Gene moved on to a bigger shop in El Cajon the little two bay shop was occupied by an elderly gentleman by the name of Harry Dort.. Harry opened his first shop in San Diego in 1918 after moving west and quitting his job as a firestone tires traveling salesman. He was happy to let me hang around the shop and clean up etc. In return he taught me a good work ethic And small things like how to hold a wrench . He would show me pictures of the model T speedster he built and raced in the late teens -early twenties . I remember helping to swap a 430 lincoln in to the 57 ranchero shop truck that at 13 years old he would let me drive locally to help customers with tires batteries etc. Without these people in my life I would not have the skillset I do today! This morning I loaned my 56 chevy daily driver rat rod pick up to my high school buddies 27 year old son for his wedding. I told him he could take my 37 coupe or my wife's really nice 66 C10 but he said He's always loved the patina'd truck. Tomorrow I'm takin the lark to a big toy run and car show in town , and the 23 year old up the street , who is restoring a 63 impala wagon and daily drives a 64 c10 is riding along. ITS UP TO US TO INVOLVE THE YOUNGER FOLKS. I OWE EVERYTHING I HAVE NOW TO THE OLDER FOLKS WHO TOOK THE TIME TO TEACH ME!!

  16. #16
    President Member Xcalibur's Avatar
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    They don't and won't have any interest in saving it. Most haven't even heard of Studebaker, unlike many, many of us who grew up with 'em. As one said, "What do you mean? They still make Buicks?!?"

  17. #17
    Silver Hawk Member studeclunker's Avatar
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    Um... I have Studebakers, a McLaughlin (Phaeton about 1905), a Morgan & Co (Whitechapel Cart about 1860 or so), and a Russian pony Troika (late 19th sometime) among others. Oh, and a '66 Chevy pickup. Sadly no Horse Drawn Studebakers yet. My maternal-grandfather had a Hudson Hawk and Grandmother loved Studebakers. Paternal grandparents I never knew. As I understand it all my greats never did adapt well to those auto-mobile gas buggies. My maternal grandmother's father loved using tin lizzies for his sawmill. My youngest daughter might enjoy Bess and my pickup. She might even like my Spartanette ('51 tandem). Provided of course they're all usable at the time she comes into them.
    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
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    Speedster Member parts's Avatar
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    2037

    "Hey Dude I/m almost done restoring that 1997 Sentra !!!"

    I won't be there to see it..so..guess it doesn't make a difference//

    This same conversation is active for us Guitar players. I have 9/ 1965 to 1971 Gibsons..and a couple same era Fenders.. Sampling and digital synth seems the easy way now. I still do projects..and actually it has picked up..but they only want "Parts" of what I do as samples to use in some "modern" mess..
    We wonder what will happen to all these collectable guitars.. A 1959 Les Paul Standard (Burst) can sell for upwards of $300,000..what will it be after they are just museum relics ?

    I inherited a One Off custom Banjo from my Uncle..a 1929 Pacheco & Klemm..and One of one.. What's it worth ? Banjos are gone out of fashion..so who knows now.
    Last edited by parts; 12-10-2017 at 03:37 AM.
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    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by parts View Post
    2037
    I inherited a One Off custom Banjo from my Uncle..a 1929 Pacheco & Klemm..and One of one.. What's it worth ? Banjos are gone out of fashion..so who knows now.
    Tell that to Bela Fleck !

  20. #20
    Speedster Member parts's Avatar
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    Bella (59..10 years younger than me) cannot buy EVERY unique or collectable Banjo.. Just as we cannot buy Every collectable Studenaker.. Mine has been appraised at Gruhn for a large sum..yet in the future..??
    I am on several Banjo forums for years..and a pro Guitarist for 50+ years..

    The post was what will happen to ALL,,and certainly one person still playing will not continue to Millennials after we are gone.. Collectors buy 59 Bursts now for 300K..the point is..who will want these relics after we are passed..

    This is a Unique piece




    What happens to these things ?..to our cars..to 32 Ford coupes..etc.. Sorry to be Off Studebaker specific topic..but this is quite the similar concern many of us in Guitar collector or musician/recording share..
    My life is Family of course..but Cars,,Guitars are my life work and passion..
    The mass of new agers prefer Uber to owning a car..have little excitement for our cars..and unfortunately Guitars..Banjos..our history// I have seen the Music business change over decades to the Thing it is now..
    But then..I never bought a 1880 Carriage LOL

    And so it goes..
    Last edited by parts; 12-10-2017 at 03:56 AM.
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    President Member DougHolverson's Avatar
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    Nothing new part #2: all those horror stories over the years of idiot heirs crushing a fleet of some old guy's old cars because it was just old junk to them.
    1963 Champ "Daisy Stu Bludebaker"- sometimes driver
    1957 Silver Hawk "Josie"- picking up the pieces after an unreliable body man let it rot for 11 years from an almost driver to a basket case
    1951 Commander Starlight "Dale"- basket case, next project after the Hawk
    1947 Champion "Sally"- basket case
    1941 Commander Land Cruiser "Ursula"- basket case

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    I am restoring my '64 Daytona. My son loved the car when he was a teen so I have it almost finished. Unfortunately, my son who is now 40 has fallen in love with sail boats. Now spends all is time sailing, while poor dad slugs away in finishing the car that he has no longer any interest in. Other two kids - again no interest. Grand kids, whats a Studebaker?

    I love the hobby -and Studebakers. Enjoy the hobby for yourself. Eventually they will all likely end up in scrap. The I have been an avid stamp collector. Was to be my retirement investment. They now worth way less than I paid for them - if I can even find a buyer. My X-mas mail has 100 year only stamps (lots of them I must add) just to get rid of them. This is an other hobby that has died.

    Too bad, but life goes on.

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  23. #23
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noxnabaker View Post
    Oh yeah, guitars... totally OFF topic, few years ago I started thinking about stuff I used to have & wanted back...
    But prices made me make one myself (from a stripped Les Paul that a friend had laying around for 10 years) & it became (my favorite) Les Paul arched top Junior Gold Top, you can get one from Gibson but I need the money for Josephine & our tugboat.
    (& I also have an old tenor banjo that I don't have a clue what brand it is...)
    I guess there are a few Banjo players here, so many things in common. That Pacheco & Klemm banjo is beautiful. I traded off my 5 string but love my little 19 fret (no resonator). My '70 Les Paul looks like crap due to the time it spent in Viet Nam, but it still plays well.

    Like most of us, my kids aren't interested in my "old cars", instruments, collections (coins, guns,"collectables"...etc) or machine shop either. So far I haven't found any kid who is that I can pass this stuff and decades of knowledge on to. They just seem to be interested in computer stuff. I expect my entire existance will be relegated to the trash pile in 20 years or so. (unless someone perfects and sets off a huge EMP and fries all the computers )

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    I view buying new cars every now and then a TREAD MILL.....
    once you get on, you can't get off.
    I buy a junker every couple to 3 years, drive it, fix it, drive it. Sell it or give it away.
    It pays for itself in the first year, after that I bank that money for my Studebakers!

    Also, I've got a couple Idiot Nephews, who can't drive anything without their thumbs. (both 15).

    Although Grand Theft Auto is the greatest thing on the planet to them, I leave the keys in my 2R5.
    If either of them figure out how to drive the thing, I'll probably get them one.

    Been thinking about finding an old 3 speed lark beater and let em have it, just to see if they can manage to drive it without killing themselves.

  25. #25
    President Member Michidan's Avatar
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    There will be a generation after millenials too. And one after that, and that... Hard to say what will be important in their version of the world.
    One thing I sure appreciate from the current group of younger people is that PBR is popular again. I can find it in any bar or restaurant around, and that sure wasn't true 20 years ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    Dateline: Scottsdale, AZ - January, 2030.

    "A '71 Hemi Barracuda crossed the auction block today... but received no bids despite having no reserve. Meanwhile..., an early edition Prius (build #2) sold for a record 67 Bit Coin."


    ​How many of us have a garage full of Buggies because our grandfather's encouraged us to keep the hobby going?
    Ok, I'm not a millenial, so what's a bit coin?
    Bo

  27. #27
    Speedster Member pinehurstbob's Avatar
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    Bit coin is a cyber currency that has come on the scene over the last few years. Its value swings wildly and has traded as high as $15000.00 lately. Bit coin futures started trading in Chicago today. I guess that makes a Prius a good "bet" to put away as a store of future value.
    Bob
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    "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

  28. #28
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michidan View Post
    There will be a generation after millenials too. And one after that, and that... <snip>
    Already here....... Generation Z

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Z

  29. #29
    President Member cultural infidel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by parts View Post

    I inherited a One Off custom Banjo from my Uncle..a 1929 Pacheco & Klemm..and One of one.. What's it worth ? Banjos are gone out of fashion..so who knows now.
    Banjos are not out of fashion! I dream of learning to play one some day. My wife and I are big into "new-grass" and go to shows all the time. Over the summer we drove a little over 2,200 miles roundtrip for a bluegrass music festival. Heck, we just drove Seattle to Portland on Friday night for a bluegrass/blues/rock show! It was incredible!


    On the topic at hand, many of my friends (I hear we are borderline millenials) are into old cars, but we just can't afford the hobby. A large percentage of my generation lives check to check. Spending some money on that $300 set of headers, $1,000 on interior work, or $2,500 on a project car to even start is a hard pill to swallow. The money isnt there for many. It is also a matter of not having a place to work on these cars. Many millenials live in apartments and condos where working on a car isnt allowed in the garages per HOAs and such. Or they live with roommates in a big house no garage space to work on a car because it is a shared space. With rising home prices, I dont see this trend changing any time soon. I have had my Lark wagon in the garage for over 5 years and haven't touched it until recently. My wife would like her own old car in the garage but knows that it isnt in the cards financially for us right now.
    Last edited by cultural infidel; 12-11-2017 at 11:02 AM.
    1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon...
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    Anyone want to trade a 3spd for a FOM?


  30. #30
    Golden Hawk Member Dick Steinkamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bo Markham View Post
    Ok, I'm not a millenial, so what's a bit coin?
    If you would have bought $1,000 worth of bitcoin when it was par with the US dollar (1 to 1) in early 2011, it would be worth $16,000,000 today. (BTW, by early 2011 it had ALREADY gained 300% from its 2009 opening price).

    It's always good to get our heads out of a carburetor every now and then to see what the millennials are up to .
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bo Markham View Post
    Ok, I'm not a millenial, so what's a bit coin?
    When I did the Bit Coin to US currency conversion the other day 67 Bit Coin represented $1,000,000 in my futuristic scenario. Like other forms of currency "backed by the full faith ... "
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-69 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  32. #32
    Golden Hawk Member DEEPNHOCK's Avatar
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    Bitcoin just opened on the NYSE today... Crashed the system, too.
    Futures had it trading at $17,000 per bitcoin.

  33. #33
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    I hit up a lot of cruise-ins and meets, no shortage of 'millenials' or younger hot-rodders. They do say people get into the cars they are nostalgic for from their youth, so yeah they might be into the Supras and 'tuners', but I see some restoring or resto-modding early Fords and Chevys too. I think Studebaker just has a higher hurdle to get past for collectors and hot-rodders, namely too small a pool of parts/dealers and lack of information.

  34. #34
    President Member bob40's Avatar
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    There are a lot of younger old car enthusiasts out there.Check out hot rod/custom/kustom car message boards and forums.
    You may not like what they are doing but it is the younger set and they will do what they want to do.
    Those who are into older cars have the passion many of us had as youths..which now has lessened in some or become tempered with a jaundiced eye.
    Are there less? Maybe,maybe not.Think back to your past and think about who the real hardcore guys were back in your teens and 20's.
    Not the ones who just wanted a nice car to go to school or be seen in but the guys who drag raced,stock car raced,worked on their cars all the time.
    It was a small group,wasn't it?
    As we age we tend to hang out with others who still embrace the aroma of grease and oil and it's still a small group although we know more people spread over a larger area.
    Next time anyone is at a fairly large car show look around and see who is driving a car or truck to the show.It may not be stock or suit your tastes
    but the REAL car guys of any generation still show up and have fun with cars.
    Mono mind in a stereo world

  35. #35
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wittsend View Post
    ​How many of us have a garage full of Buggies because our grandfather's encouraged us to keep the hobby going?
    Where I used to see LOTS of old horse-drawn buggies at one time was in front of business establishments that had a space in front of their premises to keep one. Nine times out of ten, it would be a place promoting a 'Western' theme, be it a restaurant, or a clothing store. I think time and the elements took a lot of them sitting out in the open like they were.

    Craig

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8E45E View Post
    Where I used to see LOTS of old horse-drawn buggies at one time was in front of business establishments that had a space in front of their premises to keep one. Nine times out of ten, it would be a place promoting a 'Western' theme, be it a restaurant, or a clothing store. I think time and the elements took a lot of them sitting out in the open like they were.

    Craig
    Now that I think about it (and somewhat eating my own words) I have these (to the right of the Datsun 510) but no grandpa influence. They came with the house and I was told they were sourced locally - likely from the 1880's going forward when Scandinavians settled the area and raised sheep. Surprising to find since in 1955 there were about 1,500 people and by 2000 more than 125,000.
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    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-69 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

  37. #37
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob40 View Post
    Next time anyone is at a fairly large car show look around and see who is driving a car or truck to the show.


    At any of the car shows I've been to, I'd guess the average age of the guys driving the cars and trucks to the show to be in their early 60's.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
    If you would have bought $1,000 worth of bitcoin when it was par with the US dollar (1 to 1) in early 2011, it would be worth $16,000,000 today. (BTW, by early 2011 it had ALREADY gained 300% from its 2009 opening price).

    It's always good to get our heads out of a carburetor every now and then to see what the millennials are up to .
    And I should have invested the $1000 and bought into Ebay in 1994 when it was offered to me, I'd be a millionaire now, but unfortunately hindsight is always better than foresight.


    Quote Originally Posted by cultural infidel View Post
    On the topic at hand, many of my friends (I hear we are borderline millenials) are into old cars, but we just can't afford the hobby. A large percentage of my generation lives check to check. Spending some money on that $300 set of headers, $1,000 on interior work, or $2,500 on a project car to even start is a hard pill to swallow. The money isnt there for many. It is also a matter of not having a place to work on these cars. Many millenials live in apartments and condos where working on a car isnt allowed in the garages per HOAs and such. Or they live with roommates in a big house no garage space to work on a car because it is a shared space. With rising home prices, I dont see this trend changing any time soon. I have had my Lark wagon in the garage for over 5 years and haven't touched it until recently. My wife would like her own old car in the garage but knows that it isnt in the cards financially for us right now.
    This is no different than it has ever been for many of us. The only difference is the numbers. 40 years ago it cost about three days gross pay for that set of headers. That 20 year old POS Chevy you towed home to put the headers on cost five weeks gross pay and a set of cheap mags and tires was over a month's gross pay. I think it's actually become cheaper in some respects. I just bought a set of new mag wheels and tires, and a new carb (I've never bought a NEW carb before) for my '62 GT. That brings my cash investment in it up to about $800, if I don't count registration and insurance, but I have invested a LOT of time and work in it.

    Around here the millenials don't seem to be interested in houses with garages or yards they'll have to take care of, they buy new 3 story row houses (costing no less than a house with a garage and yard) clustered together near public transportation and shopping so they won't need a car. The ones with cars are driving new to two year old Escalades, BMW's, and Mercedes. I don't know what they do for a living but they're clearly making more than the $33.000 a year I did when I retired.

  38. #38
    President Member DougHolverson's Avatar
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    Youthful car culture has probably shifted over to Tuners and Rice Boys. Then again I feel that car culture took a triple body blow in the'70s with OPEC 1, OPEC 2, and Detroititis, and never fully recovered.

    I hoping to retire from inheriting half a farm up in the Loess Hills in Iowa and work on my Studebakers. I'm not counting on it because I don't think such stuff is a sure thing since I lived through the Farm Crisis and saw relatives lose their farms and an Allis-Chalmers dealership, and my own personal bad luck with things like Heroes World and Fun Rockets.
    1963 Champ "Daisy Stu Bludebaker"- sometimes driver
    1957 Silver Hawk "Josie"- picking up the pieces after an unreliable body man let it rot for 11 years from an almost driver to a basket case
    1951 Commander Starlight "Dale"- basket case, next project after the Hawk
    1947 Champion "Sally"- basket case
    1941 Commander Land Cruiser "Ursula"- basket case

  39. #39
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    I believe modern auto companies have addressed any millenials' desires for classic/analog, with the retro style cars they have came out with. For example, a person with deep pockets can have a modern car with classic appearance, i.e. 55/56 T'Bird, Camaro etc.. That can include analog appearing gauges, for those who want the look of analog, but the accuracy of digital.

    As for anyone saving the Studebaker hobby, I believe we should just accept we are a dying breed, enjoy our Studes while we are here, and not worry about what will happen after we are gone. As someone else said here, in the end, its all just stuff anyway.

  40. #40
    President Member bensherb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeHall View Post
    As for anyone saving the Studebaker hobby, I believe we should just accept we are a dying breed, enjoy our Studes while we are here, and not worry about what will happen after we are gone. As someone else said here, in the end, its all just stuff anyway.
    It's not just Studebaker, at least from what I see here. I've been going to the Goodguys "Nationals" show in Plesanton since Goodguys started in '85 (I missed one, stuck in a huricane back east). Vehicle numbers and attendance increased until about 15-20 years ago then began dropping. In recent years it has dropped off dramatically. Back then they'd have maybe 5000-6000 cars, and the place was really crowded for three days. Last August I can't imagine there were even 1500-2000 cars. The place was never what I would even call busy, and Sunday was a ghost town, with maybe 100-150 cars.
    Perhaps the attendance drop is due to the fact that the guys from 20-30 years ago are in their 80's now, dying off and their kids aren't interested either. I know many who have died in the last few years, including the Goodguy himself Gary Meadors. I'm guessing in another 20-30 years there will be a glut of very nice old cars available very cheap because very few are interested in them.

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