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Thread: replacing gas line - ANOTHER QUESTION

  1. #1
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    replacing gas line - ANOTHER QUESTION

    I will be replacing my gas line in a 62 Lark. Old one is bent, crimped and corroded in places. I see alum, steel and stainless steel. Which one is safest. I assume each is about the same level of difficulty to install, correct? Is there a high pressure, flexible, steel braided (maybe like a hydraulic hose) hose that can be used? Lots of questions, thanks in advance for any comments and suggestions.
    WHILE I AM AT THIS, SHOULD I USE/UPGRADE TO 3/8 INCH LINE. It is a 259 V8 with a mechanical pump.
    Last edited by joe'slark; 10-13-2017 at 11:59 AM.

  2. #2
    Speedster Member
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    Stainless would hold up well, and would not be too difficult to replicate the old line. As far as flexible line, there is Teflon inner, with braided stainless outer jacket. Any hydraulic, or hose supply place should stock it. Our mechanics at work use it on diesel equipment, and it comes in various sizes. If it were my car, I would prefer the stainless tubing. If you are after authenticity, steel tubing would be original, and still hold up well. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Silver Hawk Member 52-fan's Avatar
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    Steel tubing would be fine and you can get it at any auto parts store. Stainless is nice, but more expensive and the steel will probably outlast your need for it.


    "In the heart of Arkansas."
    Searcy, Arkansas
    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.

  4. #4
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    Just be sure to use the newer (bio) fuel rubber hoses on either end!!

    treblig

  5. #5
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    You have many options, steel is what is most common, it was used by the factory, hard to bend and flare correctly. You'll need tools to bend and flare it.
    Cunifer is an option that is a little more expensive than the steel, easier to work with bending but you'll still need a good tool to perform the double flare ends that are used. Whatever material you choose you need a good quality tool to flare the lines. I'd recommend having someone with a professional tool do the flares, there is a learning curve on doing it right. I finally gave up and spent $500 on a flare tool but I do it for a living.................well part time hobby/garage.
    Stainless is hard to work with and expensive.
    Aluminum is used in late model vehicles. Its easy to bend and flare. Not as tough against abrasion etc, I've not used much aluminum.

    If you are going to do this yourself I suggest the conifer http://store.fedhillusa.com/38directory.aspx

    Quote Originally Posted by joe'slark View Post
    I will be replacing my gas line in a 62 Lark. Old one is bent, crimped and corroded in places. I see alum, steel and stainless steel. Which one is safest. I assume each is about the same level of difficulty to install, correct? Is there a high pressure, flexible, steel braided (maybe like a hydraulic hose) hose that can be used? Lots of questions, thanks in advance for any comments and suggestions.

    Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
    53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
    57 SH (project)
    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

  6. #6
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    It's a little tricky to replace the line all in one piece where it crosses over the top of the frame rail in the right rear area (if the body is still on the frame). I've found those little blue tubing benders from harbor freight to be very good to get into tight spots when bending to fit.
    Mike Sal

  7. #7
    Silver Hawk Member JoeHall's Avatar
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    Conifer is the latest and greatest, for both fuel and brake lines. It is made of copper & nickel, and much easier to bend and flare. I once installed stainless a fuel line in a 56J, and all I can say is, never again. A royal PITA, and nearly impossible to flare.

    I recommend the conifer, hands down, over any other metal. As for the absolute easiest, use steel braided rubber line, but make sure the rubber is the good stuff, heat rated, and long term impervious to fuel. It threads through all the twists and turns on a Stude like a mop string. I used it for plumbing the EFI on both of the GTs, both the supply and return lines.

  8. #8
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    The..."best" (I hate that term..!) material to use is Teflon. It will stand up to "ANY" form of gasoline/fuel the government passes on to us. It's also the most expensive, in the form of Stainless Steel Braided, Teflon. Also the most flexible. Under most conditions, this will never require replacement.

    Stainless Steel tubing would be next best as far as any upcoming new fuels put upon us. Will stand up to "most" mixtures of gasoline. A bit tuff to bend and flair though.

    Coated steel would be next in line.

    Aluminum and uncoated steel are close to the same as far as fuel corrosion is concerned.

    Copper (todays copper !) is not a good choice. It will become brittle. It may last ten years, it may last one before splitting..!

    Rubber (of ANY) design is fine for short lengths (under 12"), but from the rear to the front...I'd never do it..! I don't like fires..! Most if not all racing organizations will not allow it over 10" or 12".

    Mike

  9. #9
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    Up to 200 HP the 5/16" is fine. But you will have to look at all the fittings. Couplers, T's and other brass fittings, some of which will have holes 1/4" or smaller will need to be tossed or modified. I would go to 3/8" only if I were going to do a later swap or plan to self round the rear tires.

  10. #10
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    I anticipate replacing my fuel line over the winter [1953 Commander Coupe with original (although rebuilt) 232 V8. I have had the car nearly forever so I believe the fuel line is the original. Where can I obtain Stainless Steel Braided Teflon?
    Studebaker! If you're lucky enough to own one, you're lucky enough!!!

  11. #11
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    Aircraft Supply outfits are the best place to start. Teflon hose uses a 39 degree angle on their hose ends. The fittings in -5 are rare. You will have to make your own adapters, although some places like Speedway or Summit might have them, but they will be aluminum. If you are going to SS braided I would say 3/8" or -6 would be more common. Buying one or two of stainless will be expensive. I am a retired A&E mechanic and have been working in stainless for almost 55 years.

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