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Thread: Use of Oil Flush Products on Stude V8--anybody have any experience?

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    Commander Member sgriggs's Avatar
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    Use of Oil Flush Products on Stude V8--anybody have any experience?

    I'm getting ready to perform an oil change on the 289 in my 62 Champ, and I suspect it may have some sludge buildup. Has anyone tried any of the oil flush products out there on a Studebaker V8? If so, what did you use and what were your results? I have read online that these products can clean up your engine internally and cause sticking rings to seal better, etc. I have also heard people warn about stripping away deposits that actually prevent oil leaks on old (and marginal) gaskets. The worst horror stories hypothesize that the use of an engine oil flush product loosened deposits that then clogged an oil passage and led to engine failure. The problem with doing a general internet search on a subject like this is you can find support for any position and sometimes little consent.

    I appreciate your responses.

    Scott Griggs
    Louisville, KY

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    Perform a hot drain, then ASE marked 10-30W to the full mark..... drive it. Everything you've stated above is marginally true and leads me to this advise...

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    My 52 Land Cruiser had the worst case of sludge I'd ever seen. You could barely make out the rocker arms, so I used a popsicle stick to clean out all I could, then I did regular oil changes using 10-30 oil. I never removed the oil pan, but kept checking the rockers, and they slowly came clean. I tried diesel fuel in my Model A and made an air bubbler for the drain plug. I let it bubble for several hours, drained and repeated, but in the end I had to remove the oil pan to clean out the caked on sludge.

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    Modern day oils do a terrific job of cleaning with additives for that purpose already in the formula. If you suspect sludge build up continue using a quality oil at whatever service interval you use (3,000 mi. or 7,500 mi.) but change the oil filter half way before the next oil change. Do that a few times and most sludge will be removed except of course for really caked on cases. Have you removed your valve covers? If they are clean then most likely most of the system should be. If they're caked then you do have to start scraping and that includes your oil pan. I'd stay away from additives. I know of more than one horror story!

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    Isn't any products on any shelf they know what engine you may be putting it into.
    A dirty engine is a dirty engine.

    Personally, I'd do the cleaning...manually. Pull the rocker covers and valley pan (under manifold)...and start cleaning, "carefully".
    Then run two or three oil changes with reasonably good modern oil at about 2000/25000mile intervals.
    All those "cleaners" do is "spread to goo"..!

    Mike

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    President Member 63 R2 Hawk's Avatar
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    "Back in the day" before "detergent" oils were available I used a product called Rislone regularly in all my cars. It kept things clean inside the valve covers but I never had to tear an engine down that I used it in so I don't know how things looked inside the crankcase. Also, keeping the PCV system clean and in good working order will help a lot, as will long trips at highway speeds. I believe modern oils have sufficient additives that prevent sludge buildup but if you have an older car that doesn't get driven much, especially only short trips on local streets, it's a good idea to change your oil often.

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    Commander Member sgriggs's Avatar
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    I decided to take jackb's advice and run a flushing oil change with a high quality 10W30. I drove the truck for about 30 minutes and then drained it. The flush oil looked pretty clean on the way out. I have not had the valve covers off of this engine. Maybe I'll borrow a borescope from work and nose around to see how clean it is in there.

    Thanks to all who responded.

    Scott Griggs
    Louisville, KY

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    don't throw out that oil! What I meant was fill with fresh oil then drive it for several hundred miles or more, checking the oil for use....

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    Silver Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackb View Post
    don't throw out that oil! What I meant was fill with fresh oil then drive it for several hundred miles or more, checking the oil for use....
    I agree, as long as it was drained into a clean container. Otherwise, I wouldn't reuse it, except perhaps in an oilcan oiler. I don't think 30 minutes is enough time for the oil to do much "cleaning," of a sludged up engine! However, on a fresh rebuild, I have filled up an engine with fresh oil, run it up to normal temperature, and changed the oil just in case I had overlooked a speck of debris somewhere. But, for an engine that has accumulated crusty gooey sludge over a period of time, it will take time to dissolve and flush it out. Probably more than one oil change.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC


    SDC member since 1975

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    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.J. lavallee View Post
    I'd stay away from additives. I know of more than one horror story!
    Half a can of Seafoam won't hurt it, and it does a wonderful job of 'decarboning' an engine.

    Craig

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    Speedster Member colt45sa's Avatar
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    The absolute 'best' and most effective cleaner I have ever used is called "Kreen". It is sold by mail order by Kano Labs which can be found on the internet. Use it according to the instructions and you will be very pleased I assure you~!

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    don't do any flush agents. IF one of them really does work all its going to do is distribute all the sludge against all close tolerance places in the engine and cause damage. The only way to remove it is to overhaul, hot tank all disassembled parts.

    Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
    53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
    57 SH (project)
    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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    Scott: re-read post #12, then read it again....

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    President Member swvalcon's Avatar
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    When it gets down to the add mark and needs and oil change soon add a qt. of ATF oil and run it for about a 100 miles or less then change your oil. The ATF is high in detergent.Should help clean out some of the sludge.

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    Drop the pan and clean out the goo....

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    President Member TWChamp's Avatar
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    To check for sludge in the oil pan, you can bend a wire to 90* then stick it through the drain hole and spin it around to see if it picks up any sludge. If it comes out clean, then I doubt you'd have to worry about sludge, but if you do need to remove sludge, then removing the pan is the only good way to do the job.

  17. #17
    Speedster Member colt45sa's Avatar
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    It's apparent that no one here has had any experience with Kreen. I've been involved with old cars for more than 45 years now and my brother has been as well. In fact he presently owns a restoration shop. We've probably tried every product know to man at one time or another, and the products from Kano Labs have amazed us at every turn. Kreen has made pushrods from a totally worn our '58 Pontiac engine sparkle like new, and cleaned up sludge and deposits from a '37 Packard V-12. If cleaning up an engine causes it to leak from every orifice, it can be pulled and resealed. Sludge and crud can prevent motor oil from lubricating parts that need to be lubricated. Kreen cleaned my 67,000 mile '55 President State Coupe engine and the only leak I wound up with was the one it started with at the timing cover seal. When I fist got the car, it had 3/8" of sludge at the bottom of the oil filter canister. The only reason I am posting this is so that you don't take the wrong advice or have to try every non-working canned snake oil being sold.

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