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"Sparky"

Promoting Vintage Car Mechanics

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What can Forum members do to expand the "reach" of vintage car mechanics? I am very new to the forum, so I'm unaware of previous blogs or comments on this issue. My situation is that a few "reliable" mechanics, (in my area) refuse to work on older vintage cars, such as my 1964 GT Hawk. Feedback is that it is against their policy, since it ties up a "bay" too long. My suggestion: Require that specific required parts be "in hand" before working on a vintage car. Would appreciate your comments.
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  1. StudeRich's Avatar
    Yes it does or SHOULD help to have the "unobtainable" Parts on hand, most people do not know that Post War Studebaker Parts are the easiest to find Collector Car NOS Parts of all.

    You need to be "Connected" to the Studebaker World by joining your Local Georgia SDC Chapter and the International SDC Organization.

    There ARE knowledgeable Studebaker Drivers Club Member mechanics in your area or Shops they have used.

    A 1964 GT Hawk is one of, if not THE Best Studebakers ever made, and should be properly cared for by a Knowledgeable "Expert".
  2. "Sparky"'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by StudeRich
    Yes it does or SHOULD help to have the "unobtainable" Parts on hand, most people do not know that Post War Studebaker Parts are the easiest to find Collector Car NOS Parts of all.

    You need to be "Connected" to the Studebaker World by joining your Local Georgia SDC Chapter and the International SDC Organization.

    There ARE knowledgeable Studebaker Drivers Club Member mechanics in your area or Shops they have used.

    A 1964 GT Hawk is one of, if not THE Best Studebakers ever made, and should be properly cared for by a Knowledgeable "Expert".
    Appreciate your background and insight. Yes, I recently joined my local chapter and have contacted the previous owner.
  3. Skip Lackie's Avatar
    This isn't gonna get any easier. A lot of repair shops only have one or two people who really know how to repair anything, plus a bunch of grunts who know how to interrogate the on-board-diagnostic software and replace simple things, like oxygen sensors. They have a simple procedure set up so the real mechanics only spend their time on productive tasks. They don't want to burn any useful hours screwing around with things like carburetors or mechanical distributors. OBD2 began around 1996, so anything made before that is an old car.
  4. "Sparky"'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie
    This isn't gonna get any easier. A lot of repair shops only have one or two people who really know how to repair anything, plus a bunch of grunts who know how to interrogate the on-board-diagnostic software and replace simple things, like oxygen sensors. They have a simple procedure set up so the real mechanics only spend their time on productive tasks. They don't want to burn any useful hours screwing around with things like carburetors or mechanical distributors. OBD2 began around 1996, so anything made before that is an old car.

    Thanks for your comments, Skip! What is OBD2 (for the illiterate)?
  5. Skip Lackie's Avatar
    On board diagnostics series 2. I don't really know when the first microprocessors started in cars -- 1982 or so? Around 1987, fuel injection, O2 sensors, etc became common and minicomputers began controlling fuel/air mixtures and some other parameters. These had a simple under-dash jack that could be used to check for error codes and set simple things like the throttle position sensor. This was OBD1. OBD2 on-board computers monitor dozens of sensors and constantly adjust many parameters. Reading OBD2 outputs requires a much more expensive suite of hardware -- but investing in that hardware allows many service functions to be performed by relatively untrained personnel. The computer tells you what is wrong and in some cases, "repair" means the simple replacement of a module.

    Someone correct me if any of the above are off-base.
  6. "Sparky"'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie
    On board diagnostics series 2. I don't really know when the first microprocessors started in cars -- 1982 or so? Around 1987, fuel injection, O2 sensors, etc became common and minicomputers began controlling fuel/air mixtures and some other parameters. These had a simple under-dash jack that could be used to check for error codes and set simple things like the throttle position sensor. This was OBD1. OBD2 on-board computers monitor dozens of sensors and constantly adjust many parameters. Reading OBD2 outputs requires a much more expensive suite of hardware -- but investing in that hardware allows many service functions to be performed by relatively untrained personnel. The computer tells you what is wrong and in some cases, "repair" means the simple replacement of a module.

    Someone correct me if any of the above are off-base.
    Thanks for the background. Skip. I guess I have an OBD1 on my 83' El Camino.
  7. Skip Lackie's Avatar
    Assume your El Camino is carbureted. Not sure if it is electronically controlled or not, but unless you have a multi-port jack under the dash, you don't have an OBD system. It's just a microprocessor for a few functions.
  8. "Sparky"'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Lackie
    Assume your El Camino is carbureted. Not sure if it is electronically controlled or not, but unless you have a multi-port jack under the dash, you don't have an OBD system. It's just a microprocessor for a few functions.
    It's a Rochester 4bbl and I do have a multi-port plug-in under the dash.
  9. "Sparky"'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by "Sparky"
    It's a Rochester 4bbl and I do have a multi-port plug-in under the dash.
    With regard to finding mechanics in vintage car repair, I would suggest financial support to something like RPM Foundation. They are encouraging the training of " craftsmen and artisans" in restoring and preserving collector vehicles.