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studebaker-R2-4-me
03-02-2017, 11:00 PM
My grade 11 -12 Auto Shop class took on a stale 15 year old restoration of a '64 Daytona Convertible. I'm new to Vancouver Island and have been invited a couple times out with the SDC...thanks Mark, where I met a gentleman who's convertible needed to be finished. I offered to build it for him in my auto class.

Wow!... What arrived on Monday morning was a really nice Canadian Built 1964 Convertible 185 ci automatic. The original project stalled after the car came out of the paint shop, so my students will install windows, cat whiskers, carpet, seats, bumpers,grill and all the other bright work and trim work. We've been asked to change the entire braking system with bigger V8 brakes for some better stopping power.

At this point we've got the rear hubs off, brake parts down to the backing plates, the car has been clean out, we had to deal with a few generation of mice in the glove box and another in the convertible top and started to clean up and paint some parts. bumper has been polished, the grill too. The owner has been finding missing parts and dropping off parts by the school.

My students are fully engaged and pretty excited to be working on a cool project like this.

Allen

kurtruk
03-03-2017, 12:29 AM
Bravo! :!!:

JRoberts
03-03-2017, 07:13 AM
Fantastic! :!!: It seems most school systems around here have done away with these kinds of classes. :mad:

FleetMaster68
03-03-2017, 07:35 AM
Would the owner and your school allow you to share some pictures of the project? Bravo on having young people not afraid to do physical labor, get dirty, and learn about more than a computer.

JoeHall
03-03-2017, 08:19 AM
Please excuse my skepticism. Over the years, I have known two Stude 289 motors that were, "overhauled" by high school shop students. Once something becomes a student training aid, it should be designated as such. Afterward, it should also be rendered permanently unserviceable, i.e. cut in two, so nobody ever tries to place it back in service again. Long story short, both of those motors were only worth the price of scrap iron.

I also know of a 1957 Golden Hawk that was entirely, "restored" by prisoners in an auto-shop training program, and the outcome was similar to the above 289s.

jackb
03-03-2017, 08:45 AM
mmmmm.... I would be interested in how Hagerty & others might cover an insured vehicle restored by students ? Does the shop class/school have a "boiler plate" policy that covers such ? Just wondering.... Also, through thought, and having restored a 64' ragtop 2X..... if you don't have the torque (subfloor) boxes installed or equivalent (and there really is little equivalence), forget body alignment and durability for after 2 years....

candbstudebakers
03-03-2017, 09:16 AM
These shops are only as good as their teacher, one that can really inspect all work being done and correct as needed.

2R5
03-03-2017, 11:01 AM
These shops are only as good as their teacher, one that can really inspect all work being done and correct as needed.

Agree and Allen is the man to handle that aspect Im sure !

Guido
03-03-2017, 11:36 AM
I had the engine in my '49 2R5 rebuilt by the local vo-tech class in 1974-75. It was still running fine when I sold it in 1980.

Buzzard
03-03-2017, 11:47 AM
I can see some of the scepticism, but I personally feel it is overruled by the fact that young folks are being introduced to Studebakers. I agree with 2R5 and hope they all learn something. Lets see some progress pics!
Bill

SN-60
03-03-2017, 12:12 PM
I graduated high school from a voc-tech school, where folks who lived in the surrounding community could apply to have their vehicles worked on by students supervised by trained instructors......

Most everyone agreed it was an EXCELLENT program!....Good for the tech students, and the vehicle owners alike! :!!:

I'm sure the '64 Stude convertible will come out very, very nice!!! :)

BILT4ME
03-03-2017, 03:12 PM
Those that accept the work of the students and the instructor accept the fact that the quality of the work may not be "perfect". They do rely heavily on the instructor to do their job and foresee the pitfalls and fix them before they are a problem.

I had a friend in high school that relegated a Pontiac 400 to the same heap as described above. Even after I pointed out what he SHOULD have done, he got mad at me and told me I was wrong, even though I had already rebuilt 3 engines before I ever took a HS shop class.

You can lead a horse to water.......

sweetolbob
03-03-2017, 03:50 PM
They're not going to learn if they don't have something to learn on. It's a win/win if they do the car and the owner gets a good deal. Doctors and Veterinarians need to go through the same process so in any case you are depending on the instructors to lead them correctly.

My oldest grand daughter in Vet school just lost her first patient after many successful surgeries because the anesthesiologist administered the wrong dose of anesthesia. On the other hand, a friend lost a good friend a while back that was undergoing knee surgery. He was 45 and the surgeon had done hundreds of these operations.

The bottom line is, students need to learn by doing what they are going to be doing as a career. Luckily, I didn't blow the wall out of the chemistry lab I was experimenting in.

Kudos to Allan for allowing his students to practice real world applications. :!:

Bob

BobPalma
03-03-2017, 06:21 PM
My grade 11 -12 Auto Shop class took on a stale 15 year old restoration of a '64 Daytona Convertible. I'm new to Vancouver Island and have been invited a couple times out with the SDC...thanks Mark, where I met a gentleman who's convertible needed to be finished. I offered to build it for him in my auto class.

Wow!... What arrived on Monday morning was a really nice Canadian Built 1964 Convertible 185 ci automatic. The original project stalled after the car came out of the paint shop, so my students will install windows, cat whiskers, carpet, seats, bumpers,grill and all the other bright work and trim work. We've been asked to change the entire braking system with bigger V8 brakes for some better stopping power.

At this point we've got the rear hubs off, brake parts down to the backing plates, the car has been clean out, we had to deal with a few generation of mice in the glove box and another in the convertible top and started to clean up and paint some parts. bumper has been polished, the grill too. The owner has been finding missing parts and dropping off parts by the school.

My students are fully engaged and pretty excited to be working on a cool project like this.

Allen

:!!: Excellent, Allen; 'Way cool. Keep up the good work. :cool: BP

StudeRich
03-04-2017, 09:34 PM
Wow!... What arrived on Monday morning was a really nice Canadian Built 1964 Convertible 185 ci automatic.

A '64 Daytona 6 Convertible would have had a 170 c.i.d. OHV Six Engine, has it been changed to a 185 Flathead? :confused:

kmul221
03-05-2017, 11:46 AM
There is local who has a few high-school builders motors(6cyl.) and rear ends all tall(4:54 )ratios & no one wants them !

StudeRich
03-05-2017, 12:22 PM
There is local who has a few high-school builders motors(6cyl.) and rear ends all tall(4:54 )ratios & no one wants them !

If the rear Axles are Studebaker Dana 44's with Low "Racing Gears", someone doing Drag Racing somewhere should want them.

studebaker-R2-4-me
03-05-2017, 11:18 PM
My mistake, I have not had a 6 cylinder since 1978.

A '64 Daytona 6 Convertible would have had a 170 c.i.d. OHV Six Engine, has it been changed to a 185 Flathead? :confused:

I measured the supplied V8 brake drums for the upgrade and unfortunately the drums/hubs are not within tolerance. The owner is rethinking the upgraded V8 braking system. I now have to measure the 6 cylinder drums, even they may be worn, then who know which way to go. I will take some picture this week and post them.

Allen

StudeMann
03-06-2017, 02:28 PM
Hi Allen,

At which school is this being done? I designed the new shops for Vic High a few years ago and knew the shop teachers there. Did you replace Mark at VHS?

Jim

StudeRich
03-06-2017, 11:00 PM
It will be pricey to replace the V8 Front Drums with Hubs, and Rears, but a better way to go for availability now and in the future.

The braking will be adequate with 6 Cly. Units but with a Very Heavy Convert. it will be much better with V8 Type.

studebaker-R2-4-me
03-06-2017, 11:25 PM
I'm at Spectrum. We measured the 6 cylinder front brake hubs and they are toast as well, measuring at 10.180. I guess there is a good reason this car had a hard time stopping.

The owner has some decisions to make. Put in V8 brakes, he has all the brake parts including backing plates or stick with new 6 cylinder drums/hubs, shoes, wheel cylinders, Master cylinder.

I also have to look at the front spindles. They were heavily laden with sticky grease. I wiped them down quickly passing by and thought I spotted a rusty spindle. A better look tomorrow.



Hi Allen,

At which school is this being done? I designed the new shops for Vic High a few years ago and knew the shop teachers there. Did you replace Mark at VHS?

Jim

studebaker-R2-4-me
03-07-2017, 12:04 AM
I agree. Can you help us out with the the parts Rich?

Allen



It will be pricey to replace the V8 Front Drums with Hubs, and Rears, but a better way to go for availability now and in the future.

The braking will be adequate with 6 Cly. Units but with a Very Heavy Convert. it will be much better with V8 Type.

StudeRich
03-07-2017, 12:38 PM
Sure, PM me with what is needed and we can check used stock, and or can order New. All Hydraulic System Parts are in stock New.

Mark57
03-07-2017, 02:15 PM
Good stuff Allen! Glad to hear this is working out. I chatted with Ken about the project on Sunday and I supported the move to the V8 drum brakes.
Brian Curtis (now near Spokane Wa.) did a '66 Daytona several years back and converted the 6 cylinder brakes to V8 drum brakes at the same time as replacing the broken 194 6cyl with a crate 350 motor. Makes even more sense with the "heavy" convertible... Studebaker missed the boat a bit by not equipping these cars with 11's and 10's to begin with (IMO) :).

studebaker-R2-4-me
03-07-2017, 09:32 PM
The owner came in today make up a parts list for the brakes. He has decided to upgrade to the V8 brakes. We can now start media blasting the backing plates and painting them. Other students are installing the rear glass, while others are installing trim.

We also started to R&R rear axle seals and bearings on a 1999 WJ Grand Cherokee for a teacher at our school. We managed to pull the two axles today, tomorrow cutting the old bearings off to replace them. Upon inspection looks like we are also installing new emergency brake shoes too.

It's sure nice to expose these kids to newer cars maintenance as well as the old cars.


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