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lelshaddai
03-02-2017, 11:53 AM
Can a 4L60 transmission work with a 289? What is the work involved in the switch?

fargoguy
03-02-2017, 12:12 PM
I believe it will- probably contact Frank VanDoorn- 41fFrank here on the forum- I think he sells adapters

wittsend
03-02-2017, 12:23 PM
Most here refer to it as the 700R4, the name of the earlier version. Note too that the 4L60 went electronic not too long after the name change with an "E" on the end of the designation. The electronic version adds complications and special computer alterations. If you search 700R4 you will find a number of post on the subject.

But to put it basically there are: special bellhousings (or adapters) needed, flex plate and starter alterations (I believe - mine was a 350 Chevy to 700R4 transplant), batwing modifications, trans mount modifications, drive shaft alterations, shift lever/linkage modification, speedometer cable modifications and wiring considerations for the lock up convertor - to name most aspects.

Mine was in a '64 Daytona 4 dr. with the noted 350 Chevy. Other than the bellhousing/starter all the other modifications are common to either engine.

karterfred88
03-02-2017, 12:53 PM
As long as the bell housing to block matches one of the vendors adapters anything GM can be adapted. Get to the "E" versions then you move past the simple bolt in problems and start buying stand alone electronic controllers and a whole rash of other complicated modifications. Same is true, I am finding, with manual transmission transplants. Some pretty easy, some possible but hard, some just not doable without a machine shop in your garage. Most take the route of doing something already done by others. Me --I'm nuts--don't do it my way, do it the easy way. Find a 700R4 200R4, been done by many and problems overcome.

345 DeSoto
03-02-2017, 03:52 PM
This 200-4R/289 was basiclly a "bolt-up". Steel adapter was purchased from Phil at Fairborn Studebaker. Kit contained everything necessary for the bolt up, except the Jeep starter (sourced locally). Rear 200-4R transmission mount was bolted to the "B" Post cross member, and the driveshaft was shortened 2 1/2". Unlike a 700-R4/4L60 installation, the driveshaft tunnel needed no modification, do to the 700-R4's Governor Housing...

JoeHall
03-02-2017, 04:06 PM
When I installed a 700R4 in the 63GT I considered a 200R, but the 700R4 was an easier fit. For example, the 200R, woulda required replacing the batwing with an aftermarket cross member, to serve as a rear mount. With the 700R4, I simply removed the forward 1" lip off the batwing. Nothing in the floorboard or driveshaft tunnel needed modifying. For a transmission, I found one from an early 1990s van with 70xxx miles on it, in a salvage yard. I simply resealed it, and it has worked perfectly from day one. It has only needed topping up with fluid once or twice in the past 20,000 miles.

I recommend avoiding a hopped up transmission. You only need something capable of handling 250 HP or so, and the OEM-GM transmissions are more than capable. As for a shift kit, avoid them at all cost. They totally destroy the personality of the transmission, and harsh up/down shifts make it less pleasurable for street driving. JMHO

sals54
03-02-2017, 06:39 PM
When I installed a 700R4 in the 63GT I considered a 200R, but the 700R4 was an easier fit. For example, the 200R, woulda required replacing the batwing with an aftermarket cross member, to serve as a rear mount. With the 700R4, I simply removed the forward 1" lip off the batwing. Nothing in the floorboard or driveshaft tunnel needed modifying. For a transmission, I found one from an early 1990s van with 70xxx miles on it, in a salvage yard. I simply resealed it, and it has worked perfectly from day one. It has only needed topping up with fluid once or twice in the past 20,000 miles.

I recommend avoiding a hopped up transmission. You only need something capable of handling 250 HP or so, and the OEM-GM transmissions are more than capable. As for a shift kit, avoid them at all cost. They totally destroy the personality of the transmission, and harsh up/down shifts make it less pleasurable for street driving. JMHO

As far as stock vs shift-kit trannys:
I have two half-ton Silverados. One is powered by a cammed 6.0 litre with a 4:10 posi rear. It has a rebuilt trans with shift kit and 2500 stall converter.
The other is stock 5.3 with stock trans and 3:73 rear.
I can testify that the 2 trucks are completely different animals.
The stock one is smooth, quiet and a pleasure to drive.
The 6.0 is a wild thing. Its constantly trying to outdrive itself. It wants to GO, BABY, GO ! ! ! In fact, I have to be very careful not to spin the tires taking off at half throttle.
Soooo... It all depends on what you're after.
I can tell you, though. I enjoy driving the 6.0 A LOT more than the stocker. Its my daily driver choice.

wittsend
03-02-2017, 10:39 PM
One other thing I forgot to mention in post #3 is the TV cable. The positioning of the attachment point is very critical. I wound up cutting a portion off a throttle body and adapting to an Edelbrock carburetor. Took about half a day to get the cable mounting point the right distance from the shaft center line and at the correct angle. But, hey it's a hobby - right?

My swap was similar to Mr. Hall's in post #6. I pulled a 700R4 out of Pick Your Part. I probably looked under at least 100 cars but eventually found one that appeared rebuilt. It was strikingly cleaner than the engine and car in general. The fluid was transparent and minimal lining material in the pan. It was under $80 out the door at their 50% off sale. A Buick skylark (4 dr.) driveshaft for $20 saved the cost of having a shaft cut. I went with a floor shift from a Camaro and a console from a Cadillac Seville. Both cost me about $30. $12 got me a plate type trans cooler from a Ford F-150. The bat wing and trans mount modifications were mine (free). After I sold the original Studebaker trans for $50 the whole swap cost about $100. Already having a Chevy engine saved the need for a costly adapter. On the other hand I've heard of folks going with everything new and having the install done for them. In those cases it can approach $5,000. Me, I like to tinker and drive my car maybe..., 300 miles a year. Thus a CASO Overdrive was a no-brainer.

I'll include a few pictures for the original posters sake. The TV Cable level (attachment). The batwing modification (cut area was reenforced with 1" box tubing). Shifter and Console.

41 Frank
03-03-2017, 09:33 AM
I believe it will- probably contact Frank VanDoorn- 41fFrank here on the forum- I think he sells adapters

We have sold our Studebaker parts business and thus are in the process of closing out the adapters. As far as I know we have two kits left. Contact John (my business partner) at jcaskey60@gmail.com

Thanks

HOXXOH
03-03-2017, 04:23 PM
If you still have thoughts about the 4L60, you might as well look at the 6L80 or 8L90, since adapting the electronics will be the same amount of effort. I really like the 6L80 in my Vette, but the 8L90 is far better. Either one is programmable using HP Tuners software to suit your personal requirements.

Lynn
03-04-2017, 10:31 AM
I can't help with info on tunnel mods. But, as has been stated, the readily availabe adapter plates for Chevy trans to your Studebaker engine mean you can use any of the Chevy transmissions.

The beauty of the 4L60E trans is availability. They were used in probably a million or more Chevy & GMC pickups & full size SUV's.
I went with a 4L60E for my 68 El Camino. Write up is here: http://www.chevelles.com/forums/33-transmission-driveline/843449-4l60e-upgrade-update-questions.html

I bought a GM reman one that had 6 mos of use for $300. The 700 R4 (non electronic) hasn't been made in 25 years, and is much less plentiful. And the TV cable geometry can be a challenge. If off a little, it can burn up.
The 200 4R is getting very difficult to find for a good price. They were considered disposable, and hundreds of thousands went to the scrappers. Before guys figured out how to build them to handle decent power (most came behind low performance V6 engins) there was just no use for them. In the GM world, they are still sought after mainly because it is the same overall lenght as a TH350. That means you don't have to have the driveshaft shortened on a 60's muscle car. But... the "built" ones usually end up around $2000. Shortening the driveshaft on my swap cost $60.

I bought an aftermarket controller for the trans and a remote TPS switch. Also had to buy an electronic motor to convert the VSS signal into motion to run my original speedometer. Lots of guys just convert to electric speedo. Anyway, yes, I did spend $960 on the electronics. But, my trans was so cheap, the bottom line was still less than running with the herd.

And, I can program shift points, shift firmness and lock up speed for the torque converter. No need to pull the pan and mess with the valve body if I am not happy with something.