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View Full Version : '64 hawk Ebay NC $1800



TXmark
02-26-2017, 02:11 PM
has anyone in the area gone and looked at it?

r1lark
02-26-2017, 02:43 PM
A link would be nice ;)

Corvanti
02-26-2017, 02:56 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1964-Studebaker-Hawk-GT-/162406854475?forcerrptr=true&hash=item25d033ef4b:g:2lIAAOSwCU1Yr0Pn&item=162406854475

:)

Bud
02-26-2017, 03:12 PM
From the looks of the pictures, the car is badly rusted. With the drivers side floor rusted into the door post, it will be an expensive proposition to restore the car. I would say that is probably good only as a parts car. Bud

mbstude
02-26-2017, 04:10 PM
From the looks of the pictures, the car is badly rusted. With the drivers side floor rusted into the door post, it will be an expensive proposition to restore the car. I would say that is probably good only as a parts car. Bud

I'm with you. With the floor and trunk floor that far gone and so many parts already missing, I think it's best suited for parts. Unless that red primer is covering up a bunch of bondo, the sheetmetal doesn't look too bad. And we all know how desirable a nice '64 Hawk deck lid is.

edpjr
02-26-2017, 05:06 PM
I'm with you. With the floor and trunk floor that far gone and so many parts already missing, I think it's best suited for parts. Unless that red primer is covering up a bunch of bondo, the sheetmetal doesn't look too bad. And we all know how desirable a nice '64 Hawk deck lid is.

I also agree. I sold my 64 GT with 4-V 289, pwr stg, pwr disc brakes, full instrumentation, auto floor shift, new tires and much less rust in 2015 for $1700. I'm just down the road, but I've seen enough in the pics to turn me off.

JoeHall
02-26-2017, 07:44 PM
Just lookin at the pix, my back begins to ache. LOL

TXmark
03-02-2017, 01:02 PM
I was not planning to restore it I was looking at it as a parts car, engine, trans. ect. does the floor shift indicate which trans. it has?

jbwhttail
03-02-2017, 01:58 PM
It's a Borg Warner Powershift Transmision

LovelandJoe
03-02-2017, 05:03 PM
Parts car is about its only use. I hope who evet gets it turns the Vin number into the Hawk registry so we know it's fate.

Jessie J.
03-02-2017, 05:55 PM
I hear they're not making 1964 Hawk's in Canada anymore, ;) and the supply is limited and dwindling. I've seen much worse beginnings under the hands of a dedicated enthusiast, turn into an outstanding show piece. If I weren't now so durn old I'd snap it up immediately. Hope someone younger has the foresight to buy it and either fix it or stash it for someone who will.

TX Rebel
03-02-2017, 10:56 PM
It definitely could be built but I would rather pay more to get a decent builder! This car is just marginally better than the 57K mile '64 GT I bought at Naugle's sale for $300. and just as far from home.

scottsewall
03-03-2017, 12:29 AM
FYI Engine Id is PH322

P Hawk/Lark-type 289
H Aug
3 1963
22 Day

Jessie J.
03-03-2017, 12:42 PM
I tend to get a kick out of the perfectionists that insist on starting out with a 'decent builder'. Then comes the complete engine rebuild, the trans rebuild, the suspension rebuild, the brake system rebuild, the power steering refurbishment, and then the body-off-frame stripped-to-bare-metal repaint, the polish & rechrome of all of that dull 50+ year old trim and bumpers, and/or the purchase of x thousand $$$ in NOS, new lenses, new wiring harnesses, new windshield and perhaps a few other pieces of glass that are less than perfect, a new headliner. The 50+ year old vinyl if not already split, is stiff and brittle, and lost it luster, so order up a complete all new interior.
So they end up spending as much, if not more than the guy that starts out with a 500$ hulk.
Rust seems to be the biggy that scares the bejesus out of many, but unless it has progressed to ridiculous extents, is repairable at relatively little cost by any dedicated home craftsman willing to learn a few new skills.
A few years ago I replaced practically the entire floor-pan in one of my '64 Daytona's. A used gas welding set up and a discounted mig only ran a couple of hundred bucks. A trip to the scrap yard netted two old '70s Cadillac hoods for a whopping $50, a couple of weekends, employing cardboard patterns and working in small sections and using hammer and scrap steel carefully reproduced the factory indentation details, 'hammer-welded' into place, I had a new 'Studillac' floor that was virtually indistinguishable from the factory original. Having so polished the skills by hands on experience, the floor work on that Hawk wouldn't be much of a deterrent.
And as for the rest of the costs, they are common to what goes into a 'correct' restoration of any old vehicle.
If one can be content with only having a 'nice' and safe old daily driver, the amount of detail work and time and money spent can be reduced considerably, or spread out over decades of ownership.

sals54
03-03-2017, 12:50 PM
I tend to get a kick out of the perfectionists that insist on starting out with a 'decent builder'. Then comes the complete engine rebuild, the trans rebuild, the suspension rebuild, the brake system rebuild, the power steering refurbishment, and then the body-off-frame stripped-to-bare-metal repaint, the polish & rechrome of all of that dull 50+ year old trim and bumpers, and/or the purchase of x thousand $$$ in NOS, new lenses, new wiring harnesses, new windshield and perhaps a few other pieces of glass that are less than perfect, a new headliner. The 50+ year old vinyl if not already split, is stiff and brittle, and lost it luster, so order up a complete all new interior.
So they end up spending as much, if not more than the guy that starts out with a 500$ hulk.
Rust seems to be the biggy that scares the bejesus out of many, but unless it has progressed to ridiculous extents, is repairable at relatively little cost by any dedicated home craftsman willing to learn a few new skills.
A few years ago I replaced practically the entire floor-pan in one of my '64 Daytona's. A used gas welding set up and a discounted mig only ran a couple of hundred bucks. A trip to the scrap yard netted two old '70s Cadillac hoods for a whopping $50, a couple of weekends, employing cardboard patterns and working in small sections and using hammer and scrap steel carefully reproduced the factory indentation details, 'hammer-welded' into place, I had a new 'Studillac' floor that was virtually indistinguishable from the factory original. Having so polished the skills by hands on experience, the floor work on that Hawk wouldn't be much of a deterrent.
And as for the rest of the costs, they are common to what goes into a 'correct' restoration of any old vehicle.
If one can be content with only having a 'nice' and safe old daily driver, the amount of detail work and time and money spent can be reduced considerably, or spread out over decades of ownership.

Dang, Jeff.... Thats pretty close to blasphemy. How dare you suggest someone build a daily driver for cheap. That would never mollify the Pharisees of the Studebaker Elite.
But then again, you should see the floors on my wagon. I used an old metal desk which donated its sheet metal for the floors. I didn't even bother to hammer out the indentation details you mentioned. I may just be burned at the stake.

Jessie J.
03-03-2017, 01:40 PM
It was an exercise undertaken to test and to improve upon my welding abilities. Next one I'll skip the intricate detail work and simply go with new 18 ga. metal with a few simple stiffening creases.
Stronger and longer lasting than the original.
Topside is concealed by carpet, bottom side by undercoating. Save that kind of OCD perfectionism for 100k + vehicles.

Jessie J.
03-03-2017, 01:52 PM
I'd estimate that about 90% of the nice mid-western Studebaker's that I have seen at shows over the years have had their floors repaired at least once, as with 10 years of regular usage they were normally already due for replacement.
Purchased a never in salt, 'rust free' Western '64 Daytona, for its pristine floors, and before I had racked up 10,000 miles of only summer driving it had developed holes in the drivers floor you could poke your finger through. Rain leaks in, carpet gets wet, all too soon its goodbye to that perfect floor.
Just a given with old cars driven and regularly exposed to the elements. Kind of like replacing tires, it is just something that needs done from time to time.

jackb
03-03-2017, 03:36 PM
the 64's were terrible for water leaks around the doors....

Jessie J.
03-03-2017, 04:01 PM
In the '50s and '60s our family never once had a problem with rust in any of our Studebaker's. Dad just went down to our local Studebaker dealer and traded in on a new one every two years. It wasn't even thought of that anyone would care to seen hanging unto any old Studebaker for more than four or five years, by which time most would be sporting their infamous South Bend 'racing stripe'.

mbstude
03-03-2017, 06:29 PM
I wasn't saying that rusty cars shouldn't be restored. But there are still a lot of good, buildable cars in better shape than this one that one could start with. Take Chuck Naugle's place in Arizona for example.. A couple of hundred Studebakers up for grabs and a lot of them with very little (if any) rust, and there's more cars than buyers. Some people (like me) like doing mechanical work, but hate rust repair. Everyone is different, and it's all dependent on what the owner's skills and intentions are.

Unless someone enjoys that kind of repair work or the car has sentimental value, why not start with the best example that you can find?

Jessie J.
03-04-2017, 01:40 AM
Yup. gotta admit that I do enjoy that kind of work. The other part has to do with being a family man enjoying a potentially expensive hobby on a very limited budget while saving for the kids college education. I would likely not have ever bought a single Studebaker if I had waited until I could afford starting with the best example I could find.
I like many others, started with what I could justifiably fit into my working mans family budget without shorting other family needs.
Been a hands on involved Studebaker owner/hobbyist for 48 years and counting. Have owned a total of 14 Studebaker's, performing all work on them with my own two hands.
As a active Studebaker (only) enthusiast I have had the pleasure of years of attending the South Bend Spring swap meets, (occurring the same week as my birthday, wife and I make an annual vacation out of it) in the good old days, shopping for NOS parts at SASCO in the old Studebaker harness factory, and enjoying dinner at Tippecanoe Place.
And then there is our annual trek to the Mid Michigan Pure Stock Muscle Car Drags, and the hundreds of Studebaker friends the wife and I have made over the years, beginning in 1968. Never needed to own the 'best example I could find', as a perquisite to enjoying all the friends, fun, and occasions.
Now down to 4 Stude's and a ton or two of parts, I continue at age 68 to enjoy the Studebaker hobby on my own terms and in my own way, being content with what I have, and the pleasure of that ownership and the involvement it has brought, I haven't had reason to either buy or trade one in over 20 years.
Did let one get away however, as I sold off my long held '62 Champ pickup to one very enthusiastic and determined 15 year old for a father & son project.
All of this to say, there is one heck of a lot of enjoyment to be found in the ownership of ANY Studebaker, and involvement in the Studebaker Drivers Club experience and exposure. Its not what you got but what you make of what you got that counts.

1948 M-5
1962 Lark 6 2dr sedan
1964 Daytona HT
1964 Daytona HT -parts car

TXmark
03-23-2017, 01:03 PM
I offered $1000 and he accepted, so is it worth that? A complete powershift w/shifter is hard to come by, power steering is something else it has that I want, and I always like the '64 trunk lid. I wish he had said no way.

swvalcon
03-23-2017, 01:13 PM
Anything can be rebuilt just depends on how long and hard you want to work.

StudeRich
03-23-2017, 04:34 PM
That '64 is well worth about $1500.00 as a Parts Car for the Full Flow 289, the Power Shift, the Decklid, the '63-'64 GT Only Climitizer System, whatever is left of the Gauges less Bezels, Power Steering if you need it etc.
Not to mention the 1966 Only, Wheel Covers! :ohmy:

So $1000.00 is a good deal. :cool:

swvalcon
03-23-2017, 07:27 PM
Plus the bucket seats with the head rests. Those are hard to find. If this car is parted out I would be interested in the top seat backs with the headrests.