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MrHemi2U
12-25-2016, 09:29 PM
A friend of mine found this old issue of Turning Wheels comic from 1954 at the Stormville flea market here in New York. It's in really good shape, I think I'll frame it.
6078460785

studegary
12-25-2016, 09:39 PM
I believe that these were reproduced/reprinted, but even that was years ago.

It has been many years since I treked around the Stormville Flea Market.

Studebaker Wheel
12-25-2016, 10:15 PM
I ran an original on ebay about 30 days ago and received absolutely no interest at all. Sign of the times I guess, dying hobby?

bensherb
12-25-2016, 11:38 PM
It's the video game generation. A classic car to most of these people is a 1982 model, they seem to have no idea anything existed before that or interest in learning about it. If you can't program it they're not interested. I can't remember the last time I met someone under 40 who knew how to wrench. Of course, that could just be here in California.

MrHemi2U
12-26-2016, 08:20 PM
I don't think the hobby is dead just a little on the down low lately. We have lots of car cruises and shows around here.
I noticed a few more youngsters coming to shows with cars they are working on. Nothing pretty but all of us old timers give them pointers to encourage them.

Cowtown Commander
12-26-2016, 09:18 PM
I think it is also an inditement of the diminished use of eBay. I know that I do not follow e-bay nearly as much as I used to. I don't need more items - I need to sell what I have but I certainly do not have the time to wade through 25,000 shifter balls, seat cover and other crap e-bay allows to be misrepresented as fitting a Studebaker.

TWChamp
12-26-2016, 09:51 PM
I think it is also an inditement of the diminished use of eBay. I know that I do not follow e-bay nearly as much as I used to. I don't need more items - I need to sell what I have but I certainly do not have the time to wade through 25,000 shifter balls, seat cover and other crap e-bay allows to be misrepresented as fitting a Studebaker.

That is a real problem, and also why I don't check greedbay as much as I used to. I look forward to the Studebaker swap meets. South Bend is my favorite.

voxnut
12-27-2016, 11:50 AM
It's the video game generation. A classic car to most of these people is a 1982 model, they seem to have no idea anything existed before that or interest in learning about it. If you can't program it they're not interested. I can't remember the last time I met someone under 40 who knew how to wrench. Of course, that could just be here in California.

While you are correct in that a lot of millennials aren't even interested new cars, let alone old ones, I think there are some young people interested in the old car hobby, just not as many as previous generations. I think a big part of it is frame of reference - how many of us are interested in the things our grandparents were interested in? Plus lack of disposable income - especially in California, housing and the cost of living is so darned expensive and if you're a kid who is having to pay $1800 a month for an apartment with no place to work on a car - plus the continual cost of the care and feeding, not to mention the price to buy a good example - I'm sure it just seems cost prohibitive. When I was in my early 20's, I worked as a parts guy at a jobber shop and made enough to make rent (with a roommate), keep myself fed and clothed, and have an old car to goof around with. I don't think that would be the case nowadays.

I used to chuckle at the boomers with 60's Camaros berating the tuner kids for buying Hondas to hot rod and not 60's Muscle cars. I'd ask them, so are you prepared to sell your '67 Camaro for $5000 so a kid can get into the hobby in a way you deem appropriate? "Of course not!" Well then what do you expect? A kid doesn't have the means (or will if they have the means) to buy a $30K 60's muscle car. Early 90's Civics are the modern equivalent to what late 60's Camaros were to my generation who were in high school in the early 80's, and what '55 Chevys were to the generation before me. Old cars to tinker with on a kid's budget.

I think most of the young folks who will be into old cars will be because they grew up around it, so they actually have firsthand memories with the cars. If they aren't in a person's frame of reference in the formative years, I don't think they will have a sense of interest or nostalgia. Times do change, and I think we're at the crossroads where we will see a confluence of lot of the changes in the span of one generation that will move away from a number of things that have managed to hang around for a few generations. My older friends who are into old Lionel Trains have been dealing with this for a few years - the rapid decline of that particular hobby. I know there are plenty of other hobbies that young folks just don't have a direct frame of reference for and will peter out on any kind of mass scale. Some already have: Free-flight peanut scale model airplanes, anyone?

It's sad, I know - but I guess it just makes it all that more important to enjoy things and the like-minded folks while we're still here and can still enjoy them.

JRoberts
12-27-2016, 01:05 PM
While you are correct in that a lot of millennials aren't even interested new cars, let alone old ones, I think there are some young people interested in the old car hobby, just not as many as previous generations. I think a big part of it is frame of reference - how many of us are interested in the things our grandparents were interested in? Plus lack of disposable income - especially in California, housing and the cost of living is so darned expensive and if you're a kid who is having to pay $1800 a month for an apartment with no place to work on a car - plus the continual cost of the care and feeding, not to mention the price to buy a good example - I'm sure it just seems cost prohibitive. When I was in my early 20's, I worked as a parts guy at a jobber shop and made enough to make rent (with a roommate), keep myself fed and clothed, and have an old car to goof around with. I don't think that would be the case nowadays.

I used to chuckle at the boomers with 60's Camaros berating the tuner kids for buying Hondas to hot rod and not 60's Muscle cars. I'd ask them, so are you prepared to sell your '67 Camaro for $5000 so a kid can get into the hobby in a way you deem appropriate? "Of course not!" Well then what do you expect? A kid doesn't have the means (or will if they have the means) to buy a $30K 60's muscle car. Early 90's Civics are the modern equivalent to what late 60's Camaros were to my generation who were in high school in the early 80's, and what '55 Chevys were to the generation before me. Old cars to tinker with on a kid's budget.

I think most of the young folks who will be into old cars will be because they grew up around it, so they actually have firsthand memories with the cars. If they aren't in a person's frame of reference in the formative years, I don't think they will have a sense of interest or nostalgia. Times do change, and I think we're at the crossroads where we will see a confluence of lot of the changes in a generation that move away from a number of things that managed to hang around for a few generations. My older friends who are into old Lionel Trains have been dealing with this for a few years - just the rapid decline of that particular hobby. I know there are plenty of others. Sad, I know - but I guess it just makes it all that more important to enjoy things and the like-minded folks while we're still here and can still enjoy them.

Thanks for putting this thought into words. I agree that the new muscle cars are Hondas, Subarus, etc. What you can afford is what you get into.

studegary
12-27-2016, 02:42 PM
Thanks for putting this thought into words. I agree that the new muscle cars are Hondas, Subarus, etc. What you can afford is what you get into.

One of the last cars that I privately sold was a 1996 Honda Prelude SH. I sold it for $3250. There was a tremendous amount of interest in the car. With Studebakers, I am lucky to get one interested party. My everyday car is a 2001 Acura 3.2CL. I get a lot of positive comments on it and people that want to be in line if I decide to sell it (not in the foreseeable future) .

Buzzard
12-27-2016, 03:19 PM
All well stated.
It is incredible that some of the up and comers have been able to hot rod their small displacement cars (also what is affordable to them) to unbelievable horsepower levels unheard of not that long ago. I guess we can credit laptops as that is how they are fine tuning these modern day monsters. At least they are showing an interest in our hobby and we should be thankful for that. I started in the early-mid 60's with what was available and affordable at the time(I was earning $1.25 per hour) and being on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada, a British Commonwealth country, that meant British Austins, Morris, Riley, Cortina, MG, Triumph, Sunbeam and Vauxhall. Sure I had always lusted for a Lowboy but it wasn't until I was 18 that I was finally able to fulfill my dream and acquire a 1963 Gran Turismo, which I still have and hope to get back on the road next year.
Lets hope this new generation lusts after the cars we deem to be common today and affordable in years to come.
Cheers, Bill

Ron Dame
12-27-2016, 06:15 PM
I take my old issues to the local VA. Lots of those guys are car guys ( and girls) and seem to enjoy having something to read.