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Quentin
12-13-2016, 07:53 AM
63 Hawk;
Good news - after almost 2 and 1/2 years, I put the car over the inspection pits for registration, passed first time. One long odyssey complete.:!: (Some pics on facebook under Quentin Richards, Carnarvon, Oz.)
Bad news - appearance wise, the hood looks crap. There is a big gap on one side.
Door gaps are good, but it appears the front clip has been taken off at some point and roughly re-assembled prior to my ownership.
I have read numerous posts under "hood alignment", and read the excellent Ray Lin site, with guidelines on adjusting the fender bolts at the front to minimise the gap. However, I need to get the hood situated correctly first.
The replacement cowl rubber sits up slightly above the panel...How much rubber should be visible? Setting the hood up with a large cowl gap makes the side gap smaller, but looks crap as well with a big rubber strip visible;
In all those posts, the closest I can find to a measurement of the space between the cowl and the back of the hood, is "as thick as a paint stirring stick", i.e whatever you like . Also one post suggested the hinges be mounted as far forward and upward as is possible, as a starting point.?? As the manual write up is minimal, any assistance would be appreciated. Cheers, Quentin

Hawkowner
12-13-2016, 11:37 AM
Thanks for post I am a new Hawk Owner just joined forum in Aug and will be following replys as I was not happy with the hood adjustment . My car is in FL and my neighbor is starting it for me an tells me he can not get hood to latch.

63 R2 Hawk
12-13-2016, 12:05 PM
Easiest way to align a GT Hawk hood is to remove the engine, crawl into the empty engine bay, close the hood behind you and loosen/ shim the hinges as required. Make sure you have a flashlight, necessary wrenches, hammer and shims. Oh, and don't forget to have a helper so he/she can unlock the hood and let you out when you're finished....
JUST KIDDING! You could have issues with the front fender alignment, it's sometimes hard to tell what has been done to a 50+ year old car, body wise. Back in "the day", they used a LOT of shims and judicious hammer smacks with padded wooden blocks to align sheet metal on auto assembly lines.

6hk71400
12-13-2016, 12:12 PM
Hood alignment can be a tricky proposition. I always advise someone that first thing that needs to be done when the front clip is off, is to hang the hood first then place the fenders on after the hood is hung. Otherwise, it is a constant battle to try to get the fenders to line up with the hood properly. If you look at factory assembly photos, they show the body drop with the hood attached to the car as the body was dropped to the chassis.

On Larks, only 6 bolts attach the front clip in one piece, alignment is a snap. On Hawks, because the hood it long and heavy, not so much. My 55 Hardtop came out of the barn after 30 years; never apart. The original cowl rubber is in place and it is about 1/2 inch below the top of the cowl. When the hood is shut, the rubber is not visible but that could be because it is 61 years old. Now, look at your cowl where the wiper motor is. You will see two raised areas; one on the right (at least on my 55) has the wiper motor wire going into the car the other side may have a hole that is plugged. Where the wiper motor wire goes is a raised area. On the what I call torque bar for the hood is where two rubber roller parts should be. They are about 3 inches long and about 1/2 inch on each side after they are place on the back bar. Many cars I see either don't have them or if the have them they are not placed on the bar so that when the hood comes down, they do not rest on those raised areas. My 55 hood is not as fussy as a Hawk to open, just open and lift. On Hawks I have owned, you have to open then pull forward to avoid the dreaded hood kink. After 61 years, no kink and the alignment is still great. I have a rust area on the right front fender I need to attend to. It is not the usual Studebaker fender rust but at the top of the fender. I am not sure if it can be repaired properly on the car but if I do have to take it off, I will not disturb the hood so it should go back on without a problem.

I am sorry this is so wordy but the fact is you may spend days trying to align everything and still not be happy. You may want to consider removing the front clip and start with the hood then fenders. Once the hood is on, you have a guide for fender alignment as far as gap and adjustment.

Hope this helps

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ

swvalcon
12-13-2016, 12:35 PM
I've found on most of the old cars I work on gaps are a problem. They didn't fit like they do today and back then no one cared. Today everyone thinks they should fit like a new car even if it is 50 years old. Don't be afraid to open things up with a carbide bit and a drill if you need more adjustment.

Hawkowner
12-13-2016, 02:26 PM
The fit and finish became a big thing in the early eighties . The comment about blocks of wood and big hammers is true.
when GMC built class 8 truck there was a 2 by 4 0n the line that was used to bend the top of the doors to fit the opening.

wdills
12-13-2016, 07:59 PM
Hood alignement was the only thing about the reassembly of my car that gave a lot of trouble and I am still not happy with it. However after a trip to the Stude Museum and seeing the fit of the hoods on display cars, I am more satisfied with mine. Apparently these things can't be made to fit as well as the rest of the panels. In order to get the front of the hood slope to match up with the slope of the front fenders I had to move my hood forward leaving about a 3/8 inch gap between the hood and cowl. I could bring the front of the fenders in enough to get a nice gap at the front but the rear of the fenders would jam against sides of the cowl before I could get a nice hood to fender gap at the rear of the hood. So I ended up compromising between hood to fender gap and and fender to cowl gap. Good luck with yours...Wayne

TWChamp
12-14-2016, 12:06 AM
I'm surprised to hear so much about bad gaps in the Studebakers. My dad bought his 1950 Champion 4 door new and always bragged about the nice precision fit of the doors, and I was quite young, but I sure don't recall any wide gaps. My restored 1950 2 door doesn't have as nice a fit on the doors as I'd like, but it's not too far off either. I do need to remove the door panels to raise the rear of the door up about 1/8".

Warren Webb
12-14-2016, 03:07 AM
The hood gap should be the same & match the gap between the fender & front door creating an even line. That hood gap should be done first as it was said in the prior post, then fenders aligned to the door edge & work forward. My 62 Cruiser although having minor collision damage to the front fenders shows good gaps between the hood, fenders & doors but the front end panel gets way too close to the center of the hood along the front edge. Was it that was when new? Who knows but I'll worry about it when the time comes to do the exterior. Meanwhile I drive it just about daily.

6hk71400
12-14-2016, 08:53 AM
Warren brings up a good point. Any type of damage, no matter how minor, can affect alignment. One car I owned, was a low mileage Lark. Fit and finish was good for at the time a 30 year old car. After I sold it, years later it surfaced and I went to look at it. The front bumper was missing; it had been involved in a "minor" accident. The passenger door would make the horrible metal to metal sound when opened. Looking at the hood, you could see on the right side at the back of the hood and cowl there was almost no gap that widened as you looked to the left side where the cowl and hood went. The sheet metal looked ok as it appeared that the front bumper took the impact, but the alignment was off.

Good luck everyone. Do the best you can but don't forget to enjoy the car.

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ

karterfred88
12-14-2016, 10:09 AM
The only thing I can say is--"they never fitted new". I had one in 1965, 12,000 miles on it, fit annoyed me then, kept moving things around, till the damn hood popped open and folded itself over the windshield header. New hood didn't fit right either, but the paint match was good!!

63 R2 Hawk
12-14-2016, 10:37 AM
I remember helping to restore a couple of old Chevys where we used repro sheet metal fenders. Turns out, the repro fenders come from Asia and are stamped on "soft" dies so each time they are used, the initially poor fit worsens until the dies fail completely. We ended up having to split and reweld portions of the fenders to get them even close to fitting. Also had to "hog out" or reweld most of the mounting points to get enough adjustment and there was a lot of straightening and filler involved to get them to look right. At least, the steel stamping dies Studebaker used didn't deteriorate over time as they were used....

StudeNewby
12-14-2016, 03:31 PM
The only thing I can say is--"they never fitted new". I had one in 1965, 12,000 miles on it, fit annoyed me then, kept moving things around, till the damn hood popped open and folded itself over the windshield header. New hood didn't fit right either, but the paint match was good!!
Fred brings up a really good point that I have seen mentioned here in several threads. Many Hawk owners have experienced their hoods unlatching at speed and flipping back over the windshield. Most have lived to tell. Taking the precaution of adding a "safety" is money and time well spent.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?5983-Hawk-Hood-Tiedown&highlight=hawk+hood+latch

Quentin
12-14-2016, 06:25 PM
[QUOTE=karterfred88;1028126] the damn hood popped open and folded itself over the windshield header. QUOTE]

I have drilled the "big spike" (one mild concussion so far) and use a hood pin/ring after closing, and local licencing approved this modification when I took it in for rego. Simple, and safe.
Anyways, in terms of alignment, I am going to remove the hood (again!) this W/E, remove the cowl rubber (too high) and hinges (not enough adjustment). ream out hinge holes for more forward/aft adjustment, and re-assemble, with the aim of getting the hood central. Hopefully this will allow for a gap between fenders and hood of less than the grand canyon. THEN I will loosen the fender bolts up front and follow the RayLin instructions to minimise the gap as far as is possible. I will attempt to learn to live with the result, hopefully better than now.

swvalcon
12-14-2016, 07:24 PM
Sounds like a lot are having issues with the cowl rubber. Are they all replacement part? If so I would say something is not built right and will be checking size when I order new for my car. I still have some of the factory part still left on mine. 63 R2 Hawk.Almost all the aftermarket sheet metal is made in China and the molds are just close enough that you can tell what the part is suppose to be for but if you can get it to fit anywhere close to right Someone is looking down on you for sure.

Quentin
12-18-2016, 03:46 AM
Progress report - I have removed hood, adjusted hinges so they are as far forward as possible; as low as possible. I then put the hood back on, and I am happy to say there is a moderate improvement.
Next step was to tighten front fender bolt "E" (as per instructions on "Ray Lin" site) to se if this pulled the gap between fender and hood smaller. However, I thought I would check in first. The bolts for D1 and E (sorry, not able to paste picture, check www.raylinrestoration.com (http://www.raylinrestoration.com) under Studebaker Body Panel and Alignment Procedures, Cowl and Hood) in the picture appear to be metal to metal. On my no-doubt-much-tampered-with Hawk, there is two thick (1/4")rubber pads under both D1 & E. Rubber resembles a section of leather belt 4" x 2" x 1/4" under E, 1"x1" x 1/4" under D1. Any other Hawk owners aware of this arrangement? Oz Hawk owners?? I am thinking that I am not going to be able to get the adjustment described with any tightening of bolts resulting in the rubber squishing instead of the fender gap changing? Quentin

Hawkowner
12-18-2016, 10:32 AM
Could someone post a picture of the drill of the hood latch pin I think I know how this is done I am assuming the hole is through the tapered point of the latch pin what is the diameter of the latch pin used.
I will be able to lay hands on and drive my Hawk in two weeks but who is counting. -15 here in Sunny Prescott St Croix is froze solid no ducs no geese no eagles.

64V-K7
12-18-2016, 10:57 AM
hood latch pin....... the hole is through the tapered point of the latch pin.....


Yes, drill a 3/16" hole through the pointy end of the latch pin, chamfer the edge to a 45' angle to ease locating it. Go to Lowes and purchase a bag of medium duty Hairpin clips
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and a small length (8-10") of jack chain ( light duty for hanging flourescent lights, etc)

Slide the pin thru one of the links to capture it.

Attach the other end of the chain with a metal screw somewhere on the underside of the Hood Latch, near where the pin would protrude through. After closing the hood, reach under and slide hairpin clip through hole in Latch pin. The pins hold by spring tension and are easy to place and remove...

Don't use cotter pins, as they don't have the shear strength to do the job..

sweetolbob
12-18-2016, 12:02 PM
From a previous post started by junior. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?34438-C-K-hood-latch(revised-10-5-10)

The picture won't post separately but shows up in the linked post.

Bob

wdills
12-18-2016, 05:19 PM
Quentin, my fenders have a stack of washers where you have rubber pads. This allowed me to add or remove one at a time when making adjustments. It has big ugly gaps by todays standards but it is as good as I could get it without modifying panels. Good luck.

Hawkowner
12-18-2016, 05:40 PM
Thanks for post will be doing this to my Hawk ,

hank63
12-19-2016, 08:24 AM
I have worked in car assembly factories. Even "good" dies wear, the main issue was always to get the gap sides parallel. Too much tapering gap is always noticed. If gap sides are reasonably parallel, then nobody thinks twice about the actual gap width.

stude dude
12-21-2016, 08:46 AM
I haven't read everything above so this may have been covered already, but a couple of points;

The thick edge of the cowl rubber should face forward, and there is a gap (maybe 1/4") between it and the step of the cowl panel. If you poke around the ends there will be a pair of holes where the end of the rubber was secured with body nails. These holes will give you some idea of where to position the rubber.

Don't go drilling larger holes in your hood hinges. There should be sufficient adjustment in them without doing this, even on cars that may have had significant bodywork. Make sure the torsion rod between them is facing the right way too.

Have a look at the packers between the radiator support and the chassis rails. There should be a bunch of thick washers. These are often substituted for rubber which will add to misalignment where the hood meets the cowl (front panels 'droop', gap widens).

I don't have a problem with the Hawk hood latch design. I cannot remember a single 'survivor' or carefully restored Hawk that has had hood latch failure. These problems are related to the condition of the parts being used and how well everything fits up.

Chris.

Quentin
12-30-2016, 07:59 PM
Have a look at the packers between the radiator support and the chassis rails. There should be a bunch of thick washers. These are often substituted for rubber which will add to misalignment where the hood meets the cowl (front panels 'droop', gap widens).
Chris.

As previously mentioned, I purchased this car (63 Hawk) with rubber substituted for the metal shims at the 3-on-each-side fender attachment bolts at the front of the fenders. There is a noticeable droop on the left side. To rectify, I need to remove the rubber shim and insert the proper metal shims and at the proper height of shim stack. I am hoping that somebody can take a pic or measure their shim stacks of an unmolested car/properly reassembled car to give me a rough guide ?

PS - after 2 year resto, car road registered and driven legally for the first time yesterday. Goes well! Happy new year all.

Jeffry Cassel
01-01-2017, 12:51 PM
I like the idea of the hitch pin clip. I've also welded the safety catch to the latch plate more securely . On the matter of adjustment I have literally taken years to get them to where I wasn't too unhappy with them. Art Seebach years ago told me that you assemble the front end and leave all the bolts loose. then you run around the front end and kick at it til it doesn't look too bad and quick tighten the bolts!

Hawkowner
01-01-2017, 04:30 PM
I was looking at my hood to day and my hood is a little to the left but I don't see where the side to side adjustments are .1 of the hood springs on the left is missing would that effect adjustment?

Hawkowner
01-04-2017, 06:58 PM
Made the first big road trip experienced the hood latch Issue first running about 50 and a rough spot on the road that twisted the front end and the hood popped up . Fortunately the second latch held.The the latch pin is now drilled for a 1/4 CIA pin. FYI the point of the pin is case hardened so I ground a flat spot to get through the hardened part .

bensherb
01-04-2017, 09:48 PM
Made the first big road trip experienced the hood latch Issue first running about 50 and a rough spot on the road that twisted the front end and the hood popped up . Fortunately the second latch held.The the latch pin is now drilled for a 1/4 CIA pin. FYI the point of the pin is case hardened so I ground a flat spot to get through the hardened part .

You mentioned earlier you had trouble getting the hood to latch. The latch is likely adjusted too tight, so it's not latching properly. If it latches properly and completely it's very unlikely for the hood to unlatch itself. This being said, I too drilled my latch pin for a hairpin, you can't be too safe. It also makes it harder for "unwanteds" to open your hood. I had no trouble drilling or indication of the pin being hardened in any way.
A missing spring will likely affect the way the hood fits. The only way I found to center the hood at the front , shy of completely re-setting the entire front end (the way it really needs to be done), is to move the hood latch plate, side to side. Be careful, it doesn't take much change to make a big difference. Sometimes a small "tweak" of the pin is all it takes.

alpayed
01-06-2017, 04:46 AM
Sorry guys I could not help myself.
Problem solved.
61122

GrumpyOne
01-06-2017, 04:22 PM
Sorry guys I could not help myself.
Problem solved.
61122



Sure would have been nice if Studebaker had done that...

bensherb
01-07-2017, 04:43 AM
If my hood opened that way, it would not have been on the car most of last year. How do you remove the shroud, radiator, ac condenser, fan, water pump, etc.... does it move far enough out of the way to get to this stuff without removing it.

alpayed
01-07-2017, 05:29 PM
No problem with access. The hood folds forward a lot. No fan shroud as it has thermo fans mounted behind the radiator.
I had to replace the water pump/timing cover a couple of weeks ago and it was easy once the air cleaners were removed.
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Charlie D
01-08-2017, 01:29 AM
I am at the hood and front fenders installation point in the reassembly of my 1955 sedan. I have been following this thread since it got started. Last Tuesday my son, son-in-law and grandson came over to help. We installed the hood first and got a pretty nice cowl to hood gap of ¼”. The hood was taken off and the front fenders were loosely attached. That is where things got harder. A lot of grunting, groaning, prying and pushing got the hood to fender gaps pretty even. The right side hinge had to be moved forward a little to get the hood and right side fender gap fairly even.

The problem with the ¼ cowl gap was the hood was kissing the cowl on its way up and down. I put masking tape on the cowl to try to protect the paint. My first effort to keep that from happening was to get up in the car and raise the center of the hood which did get it to bow up a little and no longer kissed the cowl but there was a light gap between the center of the hood and the cowl seal when it was shut. I then pressed down a little which took the slight bow out but now it’s kissing again.

I went out today to take a look at the whole situation and noticed things that I had missed the other day. I am not very good at thinking on the fly which is what was happening the other day. I also took a look at the 1955 sedan parts car and there is a ½” gap between the cowl and fender but the rest of the hood seems to fit better. After reading this thread and studying the Ray Lin site I want to make another run at this alignment of the hood. If I have to give up another 1/8” of cowl to hood gap but get away from the kissing of the panels I will do that.

I am going to temporarily mount the two front doors to make sure the rear ends of the front fenders are lining up correctly. I am also going to take the upper air deflector in front of the radiator out. It was loosely bolted to both fenders the other day and restricted the movement of the fenders somewhat when the bolts got out to the edge of the round holes. I think if I work each fender to hood alignment independently of the other fender and then install the upper air deflector after that is accomplished things may go a little better.
611636116461165

Charlie D.

alpayed
01-08-2017, 03:51 AM
When I assembled my purple Hawk I sat the hood on the car central to the windscreen and with the appropriate gap around the cowl. The doors had already been aligned with the roof and pillars.
I then aligned the guards to get the best gap at the front of the doors and on either side of the hood. I think the trick is to align the guards to suit the hood.
61166
After I had the fit correct I even linished (sanded) the edges of the side grills to match the shape of the hood.
As you can see the fit ended up pretty good. (for a Hawk anyway).
Allan

GrumpyOne
01-08-2017, 04:21 PM
I am at the hood and front fenders installation point in the reassembly of my 1955 sedan. I have been following this thread since it got started. Last Tuesday my son, son-in-law and grandson came over to help. We installed the hood first and got a pretty nice cowl to hood gap of ¼”. The hood was taken off and the front fenders were loosely attached. That is where things got harder. A lot of grunting, groaning, prying and pushing got the hood to fender gaps pretty even. The right side hinge had to be moved forward a little to get the hood and right side fender gap fairly even.

The problem with the ¼ cowl gap was the hood was kissing the cowl on its way up and down. I put masking tape on the cowl to try to protect the paint. My first effort to keep that from happening was to get up in the car and raise the center of the hood which did get it to bow up a little and no longer kissed the cowl but there was a light gap between the center of the hood and the cowl seal when it was shut. I then pressed down a little which took the slight bow out but now it’s kissing again.

I went out today to take a look at the whole situation and noticed things that I had missed the other day. I am not very good at thinking on the fly which is what was happening the other day. I also took a look at the 1955 sedan parts car and there is a ½” gap between the cowl and fender but the rest of the hood seems to fit better. After reading this thread and studying the Ray Lin site I want to make another run at this alignment of the hood. If I have to give up another 1/8” of cowl to hood gap but get away from the kissing of the panels I will do that.

I am going to temporarily mount the two front doors to make sure the rear ends of the front fenders are lining up correctly. I am also going to take the upper air deflector in front of the radiator out. It was loosely bolted to both fenders the other day and restricted the movement of the fenders somewhat when the bolts got out to the edge of the round holes. I think if I work each fender to hood alignment independently of the other fender and then install the upper air deflector after that is accomplished things may go a little better.
611636116461165

Charlie D.

I found that once you have the hood where you want it, leave it on! I would not that hood rubbing the cowl indicates weak hood springs. A temporary solution is to be sure to pull the hood forward when lowering or raising it.

Lining up the fenders should be fairly easy IF no major trauma has been suffered to the body or frame. Assuming that there has not been such, tighten the bolts to hand tight then nudge that fender as required to obtain an acceptable door/hood gap. Repeat for the opposite side.

Install the lower air intake next followed by the hood latch and supporting sheet metal. Next install the grille parking light assemblies.

I found alignment on my '55 Prez State sedan one of the easiest. The c/k models are much more of a challenge. Of course mine is a later wrap around windshield but I wouldn't think that would make much of a difference but maybe it does.

I think that the key is making the hood the guide for alignment by placing it into the correct position first...

GrumpyOne
01-08-2017, 04:31 PM
When I assembled my purple Hawk I sat the hood on the car central to the windscreen and with the appropriate gap around the cowl. The doors had already been aligned with the roof and pillars.
I then aligned the guards to get the best gap at the front of the doors and on either side of the hood. I think the trick is to align the guards to suit the hood.
61166
After I had the fit correct I even linished (sanded) the edges of the side grills to match the shape of the hood.
As you can see the fit ended up pretty good. (for a Hawk anyway).
Allan


Indeed, the Hawk doghouse alignment can be a bear. After replacing both from fenders with reworked ones, alignment as good as yours was not to be at least this time around. To do so I would have to elongate the fender to frame holes to permit a shift to the driver's side but I'm not about to do that!

The funny thing is that this car had an alignment issue when it came out of the factory as I knew the first two owners neither of which never had an accident etc...

alpayed
01-08-2017, 05:14 PM
Charlie D. I think the 1/4" cowl gap may be a bit small. Ease the hood forward a bit. Also I would fit the doors and align them to the door surrounds. Then you can adjust the fenders (front and rear) to get the gaps correct there.
Grumpyone. I had to elongate the front left chassis rail hole a bit to achieve the alignment. This could be due to where the body ended up when I put that on the chassis, who knows. I probably had a bit more movement because the body is mounted a little higher to give me more hood clearance over the Bronco intake manifold. The body mount thicknesses vary greatly too. I had to play around with them to get the door alignment right.
The mount vary from 1" to 2" thick. I am not concerned about this as the cars are old with unknown history. The end result is the important thing. As I said earlier I reshaped the edge of the side grill before it was re-plated. I will take a photo of my front mount and post it. It will be interesting to have some comments.......... Allan
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Charlie D
01-08-2017, 05:59 PM
As I told you in the last post I saw some stuff when I did a slower walkabout. My son was holding the rear of the left fender while I was tightening up the screws into the body. It was held up close to the body. My grandson was holding the rear of the right fender while I was doing the same thing. I did not pay attention as to how close to the body it was. From the pictures you can see it was probably out ¾” or so.

I think this would have tilted the fender in toward the engine. In order to get the gap right we shimmed the top front of the fender quite a bit. I think we had quite a torque put on the fender so I just took the washers out. When I get the fenders lined up with the doors and that right fender brought in closer to the body I think we will gain some clearance at the front of the right fender. I am really appreciating the help you are providing.

Charlie D.


611746117561176

Quentin
01-08-2017, 06:26 PM
Don't think I can be much help, Charlie, apart from letting you know that my hood to cowl gap is 3/8". This gap looks Ok. Door gaps are good. However, I am still not happy with gaps between hood and fenders. I had another shot at adjustment, loosened bolts at rear, and the 3 on each side at the front of the fenders to the chassis rail. Could not budge the fenders to get any shift right/left. What am I missing? Do I need to undo something else? Q

63r2
01-08-2017, 08:47 PM
Q
From memory you need to undo the radiator support bolts through the chassis if you want to move the front as one piece ( if there is enough movement left).
If you need to move the fenders individually you would need to undo the bolts to the lower scoop as well because that ties everything together.
pb
ps I will double check but I'm sure they have a rubber shim between the fender and the body.
pb

alpayed
01-11-2017, 03:40 AM
Here are some pics of my body mounts. On all these mounts I used a rubber washer on ALL metal faces. This completely isolates the chassis from the body. Yes I did install a big earth strap.
Some of the mounts had considerable more rubber than the others.
This was done after the doors were hung to achieve the desired gaps around the door.
Don't be afraid to jack the body around to get it in shape.
When aligning the front guards I had only the 3 bolts in place along the rear edge and spaced them to get the door/guard gap correct.
I then moved the whole front around to match the hood.
612216122261223612246122561226
Hope this helps
Allan

Charlie D
01-13-2017, 09:48 PM
After the first attempt at hood alignment all the shims were removed and all the fasteners loosened. The upper air deflector was removed so that nothing was tying the fenders together. The front doors were installed. My son and grandson-in-law came over to help. The left hinge was bumped forward a little to get a 5/16” cowl gap all the way across the hood. The rears of the fenders were lined up with the front of the doors. The top and bottom screws into the radiator bracket were tightened and the hood lowered for its first test fit. The left side needed nothing. The right side was almost touching the fender so a 3/16” rubber shim was inserted between the fender and the top radiator bracket screw.

The next lowering of the hood showed a nice gap on each side. The fasteners were all tightened up and the gaps remained uniform. I am very happy with the results. I agree with GrumpyOne that this hood on my ’55 President State Sedan went pretty easily after I had learned some things by my earlier mistakes. The left rear fender was installed and the project is starting to look more like a car.

Charlie D.

63t-cab
01-13-2017, 10:04 PM
Short of being their Charlie, the Pics look like You and the Crew have this well tuned. I am in love with this beautiful 55 "I'm partial to 55s",do want to see more Pics as more progress occurs :!:


After the first attempt at hood alignment all the shims were removed and all the fasteners loosened. The upper air deflector was removed so that nothing was tying the fenders together. The front doors were installed. My son and grandson-in-law came over to help. The left hinge was bumped forward a little to get a 5/16” cowl gap all the way across the hood. The rears of the fenders were lined up with the front of the doors. The top and bottom screws into the radiator bracket were tightened and the hood lowered for its first test fit. The left side needed nothing. The right side was almost touching the fender so a 3/16” rubber shim was inserted between the fender and the top radiator bracket screw.

The next lowering of the hood showed a nice gap on each side. The fasteners were all tightened up and the gaps remained uniform. I am very happy with the results. I agree with GrumpyOne that this hood on my ’55 President State Sedan went pretty easily after I had learned some things by my earlier mistakes. The left rear fender was installed and the project is starting to look more like a car.

Charlie D.

55 56 PREZ 4D
01-14-2017, 02:10 AM
Word of advise for others who are preparing to do panel alignment.
Do all the work to get acceptable gaps, such as placing shims and rubber spacers, enlarging holes, bumping, prying, installing and removing panels multiple times. Modifying panels if needed.
Do this all BEFORE final paint. Then photograph and mark all spacers, shims and hardware. Bundle and label the mounting hardware as to location.
After final paint, assembly is much quicker and far far less stressful.

Hawkowner
01-14-2017, 09:06 AM
I have not undertaken anyhood adjustment yet been doing other stuff more important like add oil to steering gear greasing adjusting wheel bearing parking brake building brackets for air conditioning compressor and alternator. Replacing cancel lever on turn signals. Drillind hood latch for safety pin.adding battery disconnect.Findind source of vacuum leak whistle the problem was a leak at the back Port left side of engine a first for me.chasing heat gauge problem.Does not seem like I have accomplished much but when I write it down it is rather long list for 2 weeks.

My hood adjustment question is the right rear corner of the hood seal has been trimmed in an area about 6 ln long to allow the edge oh the hood to be more level with the cowl.Any suggestions.
Hawkowner

bezhawk
01-14-2017, 10:59 AM
I personally would not substitute rubber for steel mountings on a C-K body. They body and frame were designed to be tight as a unit neither the body nor frame were not strong seperately, but together they were adequate. Lots of people replace just the floors, but not the structure that the frame supports between the body and floors. Then the alignment moves around as things settle and flex.

alpayed
01-14-2017, 04:16 PM
I personally would not substitute rubber for steel mountings on a C-K body. They body and frame were designed to be tight as a unit Either the body or frame were not strong, but together they were adequate. Lots of people replace just the floors, but not the structure that the frame supports between the body and floors. Then the alignment moves around as things settle and flex.
I am puzzled???
I have 3 RHC Hawks (59-62) and there is not 1 metal body mount on any of them. Every body to chassis mount was rubber from the assembly line.
Were the Australian delivered cars different??
Allan

sweetolbob
01-14-2017, 04:56 PM
On my 54K there was one rubber shim at each mounting point and the rest of the gap was filled with metal shims. That may be what was being referred to earlier. I put it back together the same way, bolted it down, adjusted the door gaps and went from there. Made a pretty solid assembly.

Bob

bezhawk
01-14-2017, 05:12 PM
All of the C-Ks I have owned (14 of them) had very thin rubber, and mostly metal body mounts(shims). The front fenders had no rubber except the cowl shim. Even my Packard Hawk, which you would think they would want softer and quieter.

63r2
01-14-2017, 05:38 PM
I am puzzled???
I have 3 RHC Hawks (59-62) and there is not 1 metal body mount on any of them. Every body to chassis mount was rubber from the assembly line.
Were the Australian delivered cars different??
Allan

Not sure Al
Mine had rubber mounts between the body (floor) and the chassis ( may be it worked as a sealer as well ) and steel between the outer chassis brackets and the subfloor boxes.
Rubber between the front fender and body and steel for the rest .
pb

wdills
01-15-2017, 07:39 PM
Charlie, Glad to see you got your gap problems taken care of. The car looks great. Wish the gaps on my hood looked that good. Keep the photos coming.

Quentin
01-16-2017, 03:49 AM
Not sure Al
Mine had rubber mounts between the body (floor) and the chassis ( may be it worked as a sealer as well ) and steel between the outer chassis brackets and the subfloor boxes.
Rubber between the front fender and body and steel for the rest .
pb
Mine also - 3 from 3 Oz cars being rubber mounted at fenders.

alpayed
01-16-2017, 05:27 PM
Here is the data from the manual.
I can't find the front fender to frame details but all the others appear to be rubber and there were 3 thicknesses to select/stack.
6136161362