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View Full Version : Comparing a 1947 Studebaker to a Crosley



TWChamp
09-23-2016, 12:18 AM
I came across this nice little pickup today on ebay, and started wondering how much would a Studebaker pickup have cost in 1947, and just think about how much more vehicle the Studebaker would be for the money?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/232085031642?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Jessie J.
09-23-2016, 12:36 AM
I have the original bill of sale (and original title) for my 1948 M-5. Total was $995 _including optional horn and heater.
A LOT more vehicle. About enough metal to build 3 or 4 of those tin cans. :)

voxnut
09-23-2016, 01:39 AM
Hey now, I own both a Studebaker AND a Crosley. :)

58646

studeclunker
09-23-2016, 02:40 AM
Gas in Europe is many times what we pay here. Hence vehicles need to be insanely good on mileage. The Crosley is one answer to that. Must admit though, people drive them like madmen and it's pretty frightening in London dealing with these road fleas. Anyway, considering the Petrol situation over there, the Crosley is a pretty good little car for the money. Not that I could comfortably drive one.

Mrs K Corbin
09-23-2016, 07:42 AM
ROAD FLEAS!!!!:lol::lol:
laughed so hard nearly pissed my pants!

Mrs K Corbin
09-23-2016, 07:46 AM
Now I've got this mental picture of a Semi-Truck sitting there like a dog trying to scratch off some Smart Cars..... Laughing till it Hurts!

Anybody good at Drawing? somebody draw this up, the next CARS movie needs it!!!!

voxnut
09-23-2016, 11:46 AM
Gas in Europe is many times what we pay here. Hence vehicles need to be insanely good on mileage. The Crosley is one answer to that. Must admit though, people drive them like madmen and it's pretty frightening in London dealing with these road fleas. Anyway, considering the Petrol situation over there, the Crosley is a pretty good little car for the money. Not that I could comfortably drive one.

The Crosley was actually an American car, built in both Richmond, and Marion, Indiana. I doubt any were ever sold in the UK (or Europe, for that matter.) They had plenty of their own small cars and didn't need to import one over from the US. Powel Crosley was actually 6' 4" and he insisted that the design allowed him to be able to drive one with his hat on. That's why they are shaped like upright pianos. :) Getting in and out can be a challenge, but once you are in they are surprisingly roomy for what you are. The only requirements to drive one are to develop a good double clutching technique, and to have a good sense of humor.

Dean

Alan
09-23-2016, 12:04 PM
I used to own a Crosley station wagon back in the early 60's, nice little cars and good gas mileage. When I got out of School and got a good paying job, I dropped a 430 inch Lincoln in it. Only thing that gave it away was the Ford 9" that I didn't have the money or time to narrow had the wheels hanging out the sides.

StudebakerGene
09-23-2016, 01:08 PM
Crosley was the first manufacturer to offer disc brakes--- they had something going on! My childhood buddy's dad bought him a "Hot Shot," we were almost killed in it several times. The last incident he rolled it on a dirt road doing about 45 miles an hour--- wasn't much left after that, had I been in the car, I probably wouldn't be writing this today, only reason he wasn't killed was because he was ejected immediately!

rockne10
09-23-2016, 02:11 PM
Interchangeable front and rear fenders! How novel! ;):rolleyes:

Noxnabaker
09-23-2016, 02:15 PM
#4, as if anyone ever seen a Crosley in real life here in Europe...?
Maby in books about really-really strange cars or such.

voxnut
09-23-2016, 02:23 PM
Crosley was the first manufacturer to offer disc brakes--- they had something going on! My childhood buddy's dad bought him a "Hot Shot," we were almost killed in it several times. The last incident he rolled it on a dirt road doing about 45 miles an hour--- wasn't much left after that, had I been in the car, I probably wouldn't be writing this today, only reason he wasn't killed was because he was ejected immediately!

They were also the first manufacturer to build an all-steel station wagon! Glad you're here to tell the tale of routine Hotshot wrecks! ;)

RadioRoy
09-23-2016, 03:04 PM
Hey now, I own both a Studebaker AND a Crosley. :)

58646

My daddy had one just like that - almost. It was red and had a propeller on the front. Apparently it was not as good in the Minnesota snow as he wanted. The next two were a new 51 Ford woodie that only lasted a year, followed by a 52 Rambler station wagon.

TWChamp
09-23-2016, 03:10 PM
I have the original bill of sale (and original title) for my 1948 M-5. Total was $995 _including optional horn and heater.
A LOT more vehicle. About enough metal to build 3 or 4 of those tin cans. :)

I'm surprised that the Studebaker pickup had such a low price in 1948, and even more surprised that it was even cheaper than the Crosley.

I've always wanted a Crosley, but not bad enough to pay today's prices.

gordr
09-23-2016, 03:20 PM
Hey now, I own both a Studebaker AND a Crosley. :)

58646


Me, too! A '48 panel delivery in red and white.

JRoberts
09-23-2016, 04:16 PM
http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh58/NCJoe/Maxton%20may%2008/Planting113.jpg

Crosely Super Sport racing with the ECTA at Maxton, NC. Runs a Crosley engine. At one time it ran Hilborn fuel injection.

Milaca
09-23-2016, 05:23 PM
Crosleys built for export were called 'Crosmobile" and had badging that said so. The reason for different badging was to avoid confusion with Great Britain's Crossley automobile. (per Wikipedia)
Four-wheel disc brakes were only offered in 1950. These had a problem with corrosion making the pistons freeze. Crosleys also had a overhead cam engine.

63t-cab
09-23-2016, 05:50 PM
They don't look exactly the same to Me, though that might not stop Some One from interchanging them :confused:


Interchangeable front and rear fenders! How novel! ;):rolleyes:

voxnut
09-23-2016, 06:07 PM
Me, too! A '48 panel delivery in red and white.

I also have vintage racing karts, and I thought I saw an old post here where you mentioned having a vintage kart. If you also are into old British motorcycles, and/or vintage Vespas and Lambrettas, we're brothers from another mother. :)

voxnut
09-23-2016, 06:21 PM
The 722cc Crosley engine is a neat little engine. SOHC, no separate head. The original one had a furnace brazed sheet metal block. Worked great on generators in WWII, but not so hot in cars. The joints would suffer from electrolytic corrosion and leak. But they came out with a cast iron block in early 1949. They actually did really well in a lot of different small bore racing endeavors. Class C boat racing, 3/4 midgets, H-mod sports cars among them. When Crosley motors ceased operations in 1952, Aerojet General bought the motor and produced them for a couple years with intended government use. In the mid-50's Fageol bought the rights to produce the motor for an outboard boat motor, Crofton bought out the rights and remaining inventory from Fageol around 1961 and sold a version of the old Crosley Farm-O-Road jeep called the Crofton Bug, in very limited numbers. In late '61 Homelite bought the rights from Crofton, and made a "big block" version for their Bearcat 55 outboard motor. This was built through 1972. Along the way Thermo King also used the engines to run the refrigeration units on semi trucks. Super cool little jewel of an engine.

TWChamp
09-23-2016, 07:16 PM
Thanks guys, I'm learning some interesting things here.
In 1961 my neighbor had a 2 cylinder Homelite chainsaw that I could have bought for $10.
I wanted to use it on a go kart, but I didn't have the $10 to pay him.
That's the only 2 cylinder chainsaw I've ever seen.
I didn't know that Homelite make outboard motors.

t walgamuth
09-24-2016, 06:01 AM
The Crosleys had some advanced engines. there is a small hydroplane in the lobby at the Clifty Falls Inn in Madison In. with a crosley engine in it. Wonderfully back yard built look to the whole thing.

The Crosley cars had styling that could be described as unfortunate. Maybe one could say it looks like a car built by a refrigerator company.;)

That pickup will likely go for a big price as pickups are very hot now and little cars too.

TWChamp
09-24-2016, 07:22 AM
That hydroplane does sound like a neat boat. About 5 years ago I bought a small Fiat engine and tranny, thinking I'd install it in an older Cub Cadet, but after buying a Honda HT3813 lawn mower, there is no need to build something different. The Honda is 13 HP, water cooled, and 2 cylinder, so it's a very nice power plant for the mower.

kmul221
09-24-2016, 07:33 AM
In order to get a safety one has to have windshield wipers,where the devil would you get a set-up for this thing ?

56H-Y6
09-24-2016, 08:38 AM
Generally the prevailing attitude toward the Crosley was it was a silly curiosity, driven by skinflints, eccentrics or used as a toy by the well-healed. It made more sense to buy a good used car for the $900-$1000 a new Crosley cost. In mid-1948, that money bought a good used '41 Champion or a '40 Commander or President, a much more serviceable car for most folks.

Had the Crosley been sized fifty percent larger with a robust, reliable powertrain from the start, it might well have been taken seriously. It might even have become a springboard to a successful compact car line into the 1950's when those gained wider-spread acceptance.

t walgamuth
09-24-2016, 09:25 AM
That hydroplane does sound like a neat boat. About 5 years ago I bought a small Fiat engine and tranny, thinking I'd install it in an older Cub Cadet, but after buying a Honda HT3813 lawn mower, there is no need to build something different. The Honda is 13 HP, water cooled, and 2 cylinder, so it's a very nice power plant for the mower.

I thought you were going to say you wanted to put the fiat into a crosley!;)

t walgamuth
09-24-2016, 09:30 AM
In order to get a safety one has to have windshield wipers,where the devil would you get a set-up for this thing ?

There are generic kits available from various street rod vendors....manual, electric etc.

gordr
09-24-2016, 10:22 AM
My Crosley has windshield wipers, and I think they were standard equipment.

voxnut
09-24-2016, 10:31 AM
So does mine - the good ol' vacuum wiper setup.

TWChamp
09-24-2016, 11:38 AM
I thought you were going to say you wanted to put the fiat into a crosley!;)

Actually I should just sell it.
I have too may other things to work on.
Someone want a nice engine for a lawn tractor pulling engine and tranny?

clonelark
09-24-2016, 07:57 PM
I also have a 47 Crosley pickup, it is so primitive driving i'm almost afraid to drive it on the street, very loud straight non syncro gears, mechanical brakes., very loud inside the truck. a Studebaker would be 10 times better for driving. This a picture of one like mine, same color but much better shape

http://i68.tinypic.com/saz793.jpghttp://i67.tinypic.com/2427b4o.jpg

JRoberts
09-25-2016, 06:04 PM
One advantage that Crosley had over Studebakers of the same era......lower delivery costs:rolleyes:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/95/b1/92/95b192f6e0d71749b8e462fe2c4d44cb.jpg

Milaca
09-25-2016, 06:34 PM
Awesome photo, Joe! They appear to be 1949 or earlier Crosleys as they appear to have sliding side windows, as the later models had conventional roll-up side windows.
If I recall correctly, my 1950 Crosley sedan measures 49 inches wide. I thought 96" trailer width was the limit back then, but maybe there was an exception for wider width on the top deck?

TWChamp
09-25-2016, 07:39 PM
Awesome photo, Joe! They appear to be 1949 or earlier Crosleys as they appear to have sliding side windows, as the later models had conventional roll-up side windows.
If I recall correctly, my 1950 Crosley sedan measures 49 inches wide. I thought 96" trailer width was the limit back then, but maybe there was an exception for wider width on the top deck?

Yes, I was thinking the same thing about the 96" width.