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View Full Version : So you think you've seen a rusty Studebaker resurrected?



BobPalma
03-29-2016, 09:18 AM
:eek: PekkaP treated us to a report of his modified 1955 President coupe's appearance at their local car show in Helsinki, Finland, in another thread.

I was intrigued by the nice 1951 Hudson Hornet sedan Pekka included among his photos, and asked him about it. He reported it being a rusty Minnesota car imported to Finland and restored there, per this link to the Finland AMC Club. Even if you can't read the language, the pictures throughout the thread tell the story:

http://www.amccf.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1264338075/all

E-Gad, and you thought we brought back Studebakers with structural rust! What gorgeous work, eh? :cool: BP

52-fan
03-29-2016, 10:40 AM
Wow! I wish I could read the description for some of those pictures. I wonder how many hours went into that build? The details are fantastic.
It just shows what desire + money + skill + tools and equipment + time + resources + talented help can accomplish. I usually can come up with the desire, but most of the others are in short supply. :)

showbizkid
03-29-2016, 11:11 AM
That is remarkable work~! Just the fabrication of the new frame is spectacular. It's amazing that car was able to hold together at all with all of that metal missing!

55 56 PREZ 4D
03-29-2016, 11:33 AM
I keep getting a 403 Forbidden error image ?
I must have something set wrong on my computer ?
Anyone have a suggestion how to reset or fix it ?

63 R2 Hawk
03-29-2016, 11:51 AM
I am getting the same "forbidden"message.

packard352
03-29-2016, 12:36 PM
What a glorious restoration that guy has achieved, true craftmanship

Buzzard
03-29-2016, 12:44 PM
Incredible diligence and workmanship. Thanks for the post.

Lou Van Anne
03-29-2016, 12:54 PM
I keep getting a 403 Forbidden error image ?
I must have something set wrong on my computer ?
Anyone have a suggestion how to reset or fix it ?
Same for me too...

48skyliner
03-29-2016, 01:13 PM
A very impressive restoration, but the replacement of all the frame and floors is very commonly done on serious racers, including drag cars, even when starting with cars that are not rusted out. It is all the detail work that sets this one apart.

BobPalma
03-29-2016, 02:10 PM
:( I'm sorry some of you are getting the Forbidden message. I sent the link to Bill Pressler earlier and he got the same thing. We think it's because it is a Finnish website and some computer systems may block foreign websites.

That's the only explanation this computer ignoramus can offer, since many of us are getting it with no trouble. :cool: BP

jclary
03-29-2016, 02:10 PM
I would like to think that I have done some fairly good work. Especially, since I have not had any formal training in body work, welding, and restoration skills. In fact, some of the skills required, were self taught as the need arose. However, looking at those pictures, tools employed, and facilities, I know I'm not anywhere close to that level. There is currently another thread about a 1937 Studebaker Coupe needing restoration. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?94248-1937-President-coupe .

It has been a nearly lifelong dream of mine to own a pre-war car of this era. I'm fast moving beyond the age where extensively restoring a car like this is not a practical goal. Therefore, instead of an unrealistic fantasy about the '37 Coupe, I'm now hoping that someone with the skills, like those who restored this Hudson, will find this Studebaker. In my opinion... if a rusty four door sedan can receive such attention...surely a very desirable coupe should deserve the same kind of attention.:)

studegary
03-29-2016, 02:24 PM
Being from NYS, I have dealt with many rusty Studebakers. One prime example comes to mind. It was a 1955 Speedster. When we went to open the driver's door, a pull on the door handle simply pealed the outer door skin off the car. That Speedster was brought back to be a stock, show winning car.

StudeRich
03-29-2016, 02:34 PM
I always knew that Hudsons were built like a Tank, but I never knew how.
Now I see that it seems to have BOTH a internal Frame like a Stude. but also a perimeter frame!

No wonder they survived in a Jalopy Derby! What a Beast! :!:

RadioRoy
03-29-2016, 09:34 PM
Nobody does rust like Minnesota. Go Vikings and go Twins!

55 56 PREZ 4D
03-30-2016, 04:02 AM
Try it again. The site came up just now for me.

JRoberts
03-30-2016, 07:20 AM
Try it again. The site came up just now for me.

Not for me:(

Lou Van Anne
03-30-2016, 11:07 AM
Not for me:(
....nor me either.

Jessie J.
03-30-2016, 11:33 AM
WAU!!! as they say.

BobWaitz
03-30-2016, 01:49 PM
Usually you only see someone do something that extreme* with, say, a pre-war Mercedes!




*Or in my case, stupid -- my M5 was about as bad when I started.

55 56 PREZ 4D
03-30-2016, 03:56 PM
IT just came up again.
If you press the 2 small boxes that are connected diagonal, in the upper right side it translates to english.

Jeff_H
03-30-2016, 07:46 PM
I've tried this at both here at home and from my work computer at the office and get a "forbidden" message for each on the 2 different days I have tried. Oh well.

dleroux
03-30-2016, 08:11 PM
"Nobody does rust like Minnesota. Go Vikings and go Twins!"
I made up my mind 37 years ago, at age 26, that winter is a lesson for slow-learners & headed west. Though I go back to the great state of Minnesota at least once a year, I know I made the right decision.

63t-cab
03-30-2016, 09:04 PM
Well I'm impressed,very much effort "due to deterioration " has gone into the end result. isn't the construction of these Hudsons referred to as " MONO BUILT "?

BobPalma
03-30-2016, 09:27 PM
Well I'm impressed,very much effort "due to deterioration " has gone into the end result. isn't the construction of these Hudsons referred to as " MONO BUILT "?

:) That's correct, Joe. They had a stub frame up front like first-generation Camaros and many other cars since, to which the engine / transmission assembly and front suspension / steering were attached. A very advanced design when you consider the engineering was done in the mid-1940s for a 1948 model year launch.

The angle of those rear springs and the Panhard bar to locate the rear axle housing side-to-side greatly contributed to their superior handling. That's why they won so many NASCAR races. The big 308 Twin-H engine, although a flathead six, had "just enough" power to keep up with the Olds and Chrysler OHV V8s, but Hudsons went through the corners so much better. The competition was left flopping around trying to get around each corner without sliding off the track or rolling over...while the Hudson was disappearing down the next straightaway. ;) :cool: BP

63t-cab
03-30-2016, 09:45 PM
Bob, some of what You just said "sparks memories of My Father talking about Hudsons in general". My Grand Father was a Hudson Man for Years,and the last one He bought new - was the little 53 Jet. now let Me ask You this "I can't remember" was it Hudson or Packard that had the "Load Leveler System" I believe side to side as well as the rear ?


:) That's correct, Joe. They had a stub frame up front like first-generation Camaros and many other cars since, to which the engine / transmission assembly and front suspension / steering were attached. A very advanced design when you consider the engineering was done in the mid-1940s for a 1948 model year launch.

The angle of those rear springs and the Panhard bar to locate the rear axle housing side-to-side greatly contributed to their superior handling. That's why they won so many NASCAR races. The big 308 Twin-H engine, although a flathead six, had "just enough" power to keep up with the Olds and Chrysler OHV V8s, but Hudsons went through the corners so much better. The competition was left flopping around trying to get around each corner without sliding off the track or rolling over...while the Hudson was disappearing down the next straightaway. ;) :cool: BP

BobPalma
03-30-2016, 10:28 PM
Bob, some of what You just said "sparks memories of My Father talking about Hudsons in general". My Grand Father was a Hudson Man for Years,and the last one He bought new - was the little 53 Jet. now let Me ask You this "I can't remember" was it Hudson or Packard that had the "Load Leveler System" I believe side to side as well as the rear ?

You're thinking of 1955 and 1956 Packard Torsion-Level Ride, Joe. All 1955 and 1956 Packards and most (but not all) 1955 and 1956 Clippers were so equipped.

Packards and Clippers so equipped had no coil or leaf springs anywhere in the suspension system. The basic suspension components were two long torsion bars, one on either side of the car, that tied the front suspension to the rear suspension. The front end weight would try to twist the long bar in one direction while the rear suspension tried to twist it in the opposite direction, so the twists kind of balanced each other out to "suspend" the car on its chassis.

Two shorter torsion bars, one on each side of the rear suspension only, were tied to a leveling system that detected when the rear of the car was too high or too low. A big electric motor (actually a modified starter motor), sits under the center of the car and is connected to a small gearbox with levers that hold one end of each bar. When the system is actuated, the starter motor turns one way or another through that gearset, twisting the leveler torsion bars to raise or lower the car. A limit switch tells the system when the car is at the correct ride height regardless of load, turning off the leveler motor at the right time to effect the ride height desired.

Ingenious...and when they are working correctly, those cars ride smoother than anything at the time. I know; I've owned a 1956 Packard Clipper Super hardtop for 23 years and it rides wonderfully.

Too often today, you will see those cars listing to one side or another. That's because the many grease fittings on the rear leveler system weren't greased properly through the car's life, so one side has a little more friction in the greased bushings to overcome, causing a bind. Few grease monkeys look toward the rear of the car for grease fittings, so they were overlooked and ran dry. I once calculated that my '56 has as many grease fitting in back of the cowl as it does in front of the cowl; those for the front suspension and steering!

So you can see how ordinary gas station lube men would just grease the usual front suspension parts and let it go, ignoring the rear suspension and leveler system fittings in the rear and under the center of the car. :( Not good. :cool: BP

63t-cab
03-30-2016, 11:09 PM
I have to say that must have been/should have been the Cat's Meow of the day! any how in the mid to late 50s My Father worked a second job at night for a local Gas Station. one of these Cars would pull in from time to time,He and a Buddy would get on the rear Bumper "let the car level back up" and jump off "and watch it bring It's Self back down" some times They'd get caught :o at least that's how I remember His Story so long ago.


You're thinking of 1955 and 1956 Packard Torsion-Level Ride, Joe. All 1955 and 1956 Packards and most (but not all) 1955 and 1956 Clippers were so equipped.

Packards and Clippers so equipped had no coil or leaf springs anywhere in the suspension system. The basic suspension components were two long torsion bars, one on either side of the car, that tied the front suspension to the rear suspension. The front end weight would try to twist the long bar in one direction while the rear suspension tried to twist it in the opposite direction, so the twists kind of balanced each other out to "suspend" the car on its chassis.

Two shorter torsion bars, one on each side of the rear suspension only, were tied to a leveling system that detected when the rear of the car was too high or too low. A big electric motor (actually a modified starter motor), sits under the center of the car and is connected to a small gearbox with levers that hold one end of each bar. When the system is actuated, the starter motor turns one way or another through that gearset, twisting the leveler torsion bars to raise or lower the car. A limit switch tells the system when the car is at the correct ride height regardless of load, turning off the leveler motor at the right time to effect the ride height desired.

Ingenious...and when they are working correctly, those cars ride smoother than anything at the time. I know; I've owned a 1956 Packard Clipper Super hardtop for 23 years and it rides wonderfully.

Too often today, you will see those cars listing to one side or another. That's because the many grease fittings on the rear leveler system weren't greased properly through the car's life, so one side has a little more friction in the greased bushings to overcome, causing a bind. Few grease monkeys look toward the rear of the car for grease fittings, so they were overlooked and ran dry. I once calculated that my '56 has as many grease fitting in back of the cowl as it does in front of the cowl; those for the front suspension and steering!

So you can see how ordinary gas station lube men would just grease the usual front suspension parts and let it go, ignoring the rear suspension and leveler system fittings in the rear and under the center of the car. :( Not good. :cool: BP

Dads Baby
03-31-2016, 12:23 AM
Here is the page in English.

https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&prev=search&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=fi&u=http://www.amccf.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl%3Fnum%3D1264338075&usg=ALkJrhhDb0LR5rjLREPINrnzH16G3wGsdQ

BobPalma
03-31-2016, 07:40 AM
I have to say that must have been/should have been the Cat's Meow of the day! any how in the mid to late 50s My Father worked a second job at night for a local Gas Station. one of these Cars would pull in from time to time,He and a Buddy would get on the rear Bumper "let the car level back up" and jump off "and watch it bring It's Self back down" some times They'd get caught :o at least that's how I remember His Story so long ago.

:) Yep, Joe; that happened all the time back then, so I'm sure your Dad's recollections are accurate. The system doesn't shut off when you remove the ignition key and leave the car, so many youngsters took rides up and down on the rear of those cars.

As I said, the leveler motor is a heavy-duty starter motor and draws a lot of current to level the car, bring it up to proper riding height, when it is down. It doesn't take too long to run the battery down playing like that...and if you consider the fact that I was ten years old at the time and Dad always had a "demo" around....well, you get the idea...;) :cool: BP

austrian
04-01-2016, 09:07 AM
I bookmarked the thread to remember, how the best possible work should be done ...... probably the best example for the (less skilled) work on my 54 Champ.

Thanks for the post and thanks for the translated version!

Peanut
04-03-2016, 03:38 PM
Can someone post the original picture in a different format? When I click on the link, it says "forbidden".

Bish
04-03-2016, 06:22 PM
Nobody does rust like Minnesota. Go Vikings and go Twins!
Vermont will give it a run for its money! ;)

cultural infidel
04-04-2016, 01:57 PM
Holy Moses! That is one hell of a feat!

studeclunker
04-04-2016, 05:10 PM
Thank you Carey, that did the trick! He certainly has the interior close. It looks very much like I remember my Grandfather's Hornet. Same colour scheme. Gosh, all it needs is the stink of the old man's cheap cigars! Fabulous effort for a fabulous car!

BobPalma
04-04-2016, 05:49 PM
:eek: I just took another look at those photos. Would you really want to swing the weight of a 308 Hornet engine and early Hydra-Matic Drive off that flimsy a chain? Take a close look at the chain they used to pull the engine. I wouldn't want to have been anywhere near it; that's got to be 1,000 pounds with all the accessories attached. :oops: :cool: BP

t walgamuth
04-04-2016, 06:04 PM
:) That's correct, Joe. They had a stub frame up front like first-generation Camaros and many other cars since, to which the engine / transmission assembly and front suspension / steering were attached. A very advanced design when you consider the engineering was done in the mid-1940s for a 1948 model year launch.

The angle of those rear springs and the Panhard bar to locate the rear axle housing side-to-side greatly contributed to their superior handling. That's why they won so many NASCAR races. The big 308 Twin-H engine, although a flathead six, had "just enough" power to keep up with the Olds and Chrysler OHV V8s, but Hudsons went through the corners so much better. The competition was left flopping around trying to get around each corner without sliding off the track or rolling over...while the Hudson was disappearing down the next straightaway. ;) :cool: BP

Another big factor is the low center of gravity in those Hudsons.

rodnutrandy
04-05-2016, 10:42 PM
I put my 1946 M series truck on abandoned and neglected On facebook and was shocked to get 942 likes at last look , But do think it made a leap forward , even thou some disagree.

RadioRoy
04-07-2016, 05:11 PM
"Nobody does rust like Minnesota. Go Vikings and go Twins!"
I made up my mind 37 years ago, at age 26, that winter is a lesson for slow-learners & headed west. Though I go back to the great state of Minnesota at least once a year, I know I made the right decision.

Me too. I left at age 24 in 1973 and that was 43 years ago.

dleroux
04-07-2016, 09:17 PM
Roy,
Where in MN? I'm from Duluth. Remember Bridgeman's, my dad managed one so I guess I grew up in an ice cream shop. Met Bart Starr who gave us a tour of Lambeau Field back in '66 during a break from a basketball tournament. Mr. Starr asked if we wanted an autograph & I politely declined fearing what might happen if my dad found out being the rabid Viking fan that he was. He would of considered it consorting with the enemy. Lived through the Fran Tarkenton days, along with Joe Kapp and the frozen Metropolitan stadium. Seahawks fan now but I still am hoping for a return to the SB for the Viikes, they deserve another shot & if they do get it, I hope they finally win.