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Okiejoe86
03-20-2016, 03:54 PM
Has anyone ever entered their car into The Great Race?? When I was in automotive school in 2005, I got the chance to work at the pit stop for cars in Puyallup, Wa.

Looking at past pictures, I was just thinking of how much fun it would be to drive across the country in an old school race.

Sam Ensley
03-20-2016, 04:08 PM
Does anybody have an educated guess as to how much money it would take to enter a car and run the race? Include all expenses including lodging and food, please.

Okiejoe86
03-20-2016, 04:24 PM
Does anybody have an educated guess as to how much money it would take to enter a car and run the race? Include all expenses including lodging and food, please.

Private party entry fee = $5000
Corporate entry fee = $7000
X-Cup (Student Only) = $1500

Those prices are "per car" and each car can carry up to 4 people.

I think the meals are free at "hosted" locations. Not sure about room and board.

The race looks like it would be an absolute blast!!

DieselJim
03-20-2016, 04:29 PM
Did it in 1990 with the Studebaker National Museum. I was the engine builder and crew chief. Got to drive 2 different days. I was better at being the mechanic. We used the 1928 Roaster # 6. Did have a great time.

Okiejoe86
03-20-2016, 04:42 PM
Did it in 1990 with the Studebaker National Museum. I was the engine builder and crew chief. Got to drive 2 different days. I was better at being the mechanic. We used the 1928 Roaster # 6. Did have a great time.

Do you have any pictures from the race?

Lark Parker
03-20-2016, 04:43 PM
I was on a crew back about 1987. At that time the entrance fee was $5K for individual Entries and $10K for commercial entries. It looked like most of those guys had their own enterprises and were using the race for tax write off fun. The others were mostly people who thought that was pocket change. I got to work on Franklin D. Roosevelt's car one night! We stayed at the most expensive hotels arranged by GAR, but that's not the way I would do it if going again. Staying at other hotels was permissible then, maybe still is now.

My opinion: Send your support crew (if any) 12 hours ahead to take care of the car when you get there. Then they take off for the next stop and wait for the cars to arrive. Rinse and repeat and stay at cheaper hotels. (Nobody did this.) My method would keep the support people fresh and ready to work on the car instead of -- working at night after the cars arrive and the crowd leaves, getting little sleep and having to leave the required hour before the race cars the next morning.

1987 -- Twelve grueling days from Disneyland, Ca to Disney World, Fl. This year this year looks like a short hop.

DieselJim
03-20-2016, 05:05 PM
Do you have any pictures from the race?
I should have, but after all this time, I don't know where to look. We did move in 92. Still boxes packed in the back of the closet.

roadster dave
03-20-2016, 05:08 PM
diesel jim; Would you elaborate a little on the Great Race car in the museum? I have a 27 Comm. sport roadster very similar. The first thing that hit me was how did you manage the heat from the engine and floor boards? Two other things was the seat comfort/discomfort and the best speed for the car. Also, what rear end gear ratio did the car have? I'm sure others would like to hear of your adventure.

Okiejoe86
03-20-2016, 05:28 PM
Wonder if it would be possible to gather some SDC folks and get a team together for one year.... I would gladly volunteer my time and my car for the journey and adventure!!

DieselJim
03-20-2016, 10:23 PM
diesel jim; Would you elaborate a little on the Great Race car in the museum? I have a 27 Comm. sport roadster very similar. The first thing that hit me was how did you manage the heat from the engine and floor boards? Two other things was the seat comfort/discomfort and the best speed for the car. Also, what rear end gear ratio did the car have? I'm sure others would like to hear of your adventure.
This is one of the three cars that Studebaker ran on a board race track. 25,000 miles in 23,000 minutes. That included all pit stops, valve adjust, oil changes and driver changes. At one of the stops, the oil pan had to be removed to weld drain bung back on. During the GAR, we has our first experience with alcohol gas. Car would hardly idle. We picked up some sheet metal, snips, and pop rivets and fashioned a air scoop to move cool air over the carburetor. Also removed the hood sides. The seat was reupholstered with modern material. Don't remember doing anything special about engine heat. The pilot complained that didn't have the power on the hills. On our free day, I set the points, checked the plugs. While testing on the road, throttle on the floor, it was picking up speed. I pushed extra hard and the car jumped like it got hit in the rear. I discovered that the carburetor was a 2 stage. Readjusted the linkage and that fixed the power problem. The brakes didn't work wright. While at the Sloan Museum, I mentioned it to a Studebaker person. He ran hone and got some brake parts. I then discovered that Bendix, while rebuilding the brakes, had put the lever on upside dawn causing the s cam to pull on the back side. I don't know the gear ratio, but I believe the car could easily run 85-90.

kurtruk
03-20-2016, 11:10 PM
Was it George Reitnour (sp)? that had the red/silver '36? batwing coupe in the race many years ago? Was a lot of coverage in Turning Wheels about it. These races can be hard on the cars. And the timed events (if you want to be competitive) can be hard on the people.

jclary
03-20-2016, 11:12 PM
Yes, George (the watch repairman) was one of the ones on the team that raced the '37. Great guy!

rockinhawk
03-21-2016, 07:01 AM
Yes, George (the watch repairman) was one of the ones on the team that raced the '37. Great guy!And he always timed himself with a Studebaker Pocket watch.

plwindish
03-21-2016, 04:59 PM
There was a blue and white 55 President from Oregon or Washington as well as one other Stude in the Great American Race in 2015. The race is for cars 1972 and older. My wife and I participated in the Great American Tour last year, which started as an overflow of the race fans that weren't able to get into the race, as they have a limit on the entries. We in the tour did not have to be timed between stops like the race participants, but we had the same type of directions from point to point. The race covered Rte 66 last year and was a blast to go along the "Mother Road". The cost for the tour was very reasonable, covering lodging and meals. The tour criss-crossed the route the race followed and we were able to get to know some of the race participants and see their cars close up. This year's tour is smaller, not covering the entire route of the race. People from all over the world enter and participate in the race, teams from Sweden and Japan participated. Its a great thing to experience and the winners get to split a pretty healthy purse.

Participants do need to purchase a specified clock and speedometer to use in the race, and I'm told, they aren't cheap.

Studebaker Wheel
03-21-2016, 06:15 PM
Yes, George (the watch repairman) was one of the ones on the team that raced the '37. Great guy!

It was a '36 Dictator. Have many pictures.

6hk71400
03-21-2016, 07:51 PM
Our chapter sponsored George for one of the races. George had some health problems during the time of the race and had a suit made to keep him cool driving across the desert and summer heat. He told of when the brakes went out coming down the mountain, the 36 looked like a red and silver flash that obtained speeds going downhill that were (ahem) around twice the legal limit.

Hope George has overcome his health problems and has a continued great life.

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ
Home of Lazarus and Meshach

Lark Parker
03-21-2016, 08:19 PM
George had some health problems during the time of the race and had a suit made to keep him cool driving across the desert and summer heat.

Bob Miles

My wife and I made that cooling vest. I used an ice water cooler, a 12volt bilge pump. a small control valve, and plastic tubing sewn (thanks, Barb) into the vest. It's only overlooked design consideration was an urge to urinate when the ice water started flowing up your spine.

jclary
03-21-2016, 09:01 PM
It was a '36 Dictator. Have many pictures.
,
In that case, it had a back window that could open for additional air flow. Actually, the '37 was a typo.:oops: (Old laptop with no numbers keyboard)

Thanks for the correction anyway.;) How 'bout posting a few of those pictures, if it's not too much trouble.:) That car looked great with all the sponsor decals.:!:

Bullet
03-21-2016, 09:55 PM
One of our chapter members here in LA Chapter has been in. The Great Race several times. In 2015 he drove a 64 Daytona hard top. It is red with a white vinyl top resembling a 65. You are correct about the speedo and timing device. I am pretty sure he is in the 2016 race as well. I will try to find out his name.

Mark

Studebaker Wheel
03-22-2016, 03:52 AM
,
In that case, it had a back window that could open for additional air flow. Actually, the '37 was a typo.:oops: (Old laptop with no numbers keyboard)

Thanks for the correction anyway.;) How 'bout posting a few of those pictures, if it's not too much trouble.:) That car looked great with all the sponsor decals.:!:

You ask for it.

The car is owned by George Reitenour who resided in Portland, Indiana (Jay County) when he was active in the old car rallies back in the 1980s and 90's. He raced in at lest three of the cross country GAR rally's (I think more) plus a lot of other shorter rallies. His navigator for most of the contests was Alan Hadley of Noblesville, IN. Both George and Alan reside in Tennessee currently. The '36 Dictator coupe was restored by George from a nice original one-owner 58,000 mile car purchased in 1982 in Indianapolis. Its first GAR was in 1987. It has featured been in Turning Wheels, The Antique Studebaker Review as well as Cars & Parts magazine.

524765247752478524795248052481

- - - Updated - - -


,
In that case, it had a back window that could open for additional air flow. Actually, the '37 was a typo.:oops: (Old laptop with no numbers keyboard)

Thanks for the correction anyway.;) How 'bout posting a few of those pictures, if it's not too much trouble.:) That car looked great with all the sponsor decals.:!:

You ask for it.

The car is owned by George Reitenour who resided in Portland, Indiana (Jay County) when he was active in the old car rallies back in the 1980s and 90's. He raced in at lest three of the cross country GAR rally's (I think more) plus a lot of other shorter rallies. His navigator for most of the contests was Alan Hadley of Noblesville, IN. Both George and Alan reside in Tennessee currently. The '36 Dictator coupe was restored by George from a nice original one-owner 58,000 mile car purchased in 1982 in Indianapolis. Its first GAR was in 1987. It has featured been in Turning Wheels, The Antique Studebaker Review as well as Cars & Parts magazine.

524765247752478524795248052481

Lark Parker
03-22-2016, 04:47 AM
diesel jim; Would you elaborate a little on the Great Race car in the museum? I have a 27 Comm. sport roadster very similar. The first thing that hit me was how did you manage the heat from the engine and floor boards? Two other things was the seat comfort/discomfort and the best speed for the car. Also, what rear end gear ratio did the car have? I'm sure others would like to hear of your adventure.

I'm not diesel jim but I will butt in anyhow.

Car speed will be specified for every foot of the "race". It's actually a rally.
If you have your own car --not borrowed__ you have a bit more freedom to improve the car performance.

I don't know what was done on the museum car but I did these things to the 36 Dictator (and they tested ok across Death Valley).

Installed the largest (junkyard) radiator fan that would fit. Added a manual switch for driver control.
Used wooden blocks to prop the rear edge of the hood sides to pull hot air out of engine compartment.
Capped the radiator and bronzed an additional radiator neck on the end of the overflow tube. Added a 5 psi recovery type cap there and a recovery tank.
I had some rugged shiny plasticized foil that large commercial computers came in. It was used to add a reflective layer under the carpet and backing the firewall. Made a big difference. Maybe something similar could be found at a builder supply place. There is glued air duct coat (thin foam) that could be used on the firewall but it may not be tough enough for the floor. Perhaps there is a building roofing sheet that would work ok on the floor.
The car had roof insulation added when the interior was replaced.
Wrap the exhaust manifold and head pipe with insulation available for that purpose. Jegs,PEP boys, etc.
There are radiator additives that "makes water wetter" at auto stores. Use this to improve heat transfer between coolant and metal.
50-50 antrifreeze mixture is not optimum for heat transfer. If I can find my Prestone book I will refresh my memory as to what is best. 50-50 isn't bad, just not perfect.

Unrelated prep tip:
Fill the tires with nitrogen and they will keep their size under different temperatures.
Many of the older cars had an added overdrive unit in the driveline.

Check the recent rule book for what is permissible.
If its not listed, go for it.

Okiejoe86
03-22-2016, 08:06 AM
You ask for it.

The car is owned by George Reitenour who resided in Portland, Indiana (Jay County) when he was active in the old car rallies back in the 1980s and 90's. He raced in at lest three of the cross country GAR rally's (I think more) plus a lot of other shorter rallies. His navigator for most of the contests was Alan Hadley of Noblesville, IN. Both George and Alan reside in Tennessee currently. The '36 Dictator coupe was restored by George from a nice original one-owner 58,000 mile car purchased in 1982 in Indianapolis. Its first GAR was in 1987. It has featured been in Turning Wheels, The Antique Studebaker Review as well as Cars & Parts magazine.

524765247752478524795248052481

- - - Updated - - -



You ask for it.

The car is owned by George Reitenour who resided in Portland, Indiana (Jay County) when he was active in the old car rallies back in the 1980s and 90's. He raced in at lest three of the cross country GAR rally's (I think more) plus a lot of other shorter rallies. His navigator for most of the contests was Alan Hadley of Noblesville, IN. Both George and Alan reside in Tennessee currently. The '36 Dictator coupe was restored by George from a nice original one-owner 58,000 mile car purchased in 1982 in Indianapolis. Its first GAR was in 1987. It has featured been in Turning Wheels, The Antique Studebaker Review as well as Cars & Parts magazine.

524765247752478524795248052481

That is so awesome on so many levels!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Makes me want to get my President worthy enough for a trip that long!

Mike
03-22-2016, 08:20 AM
Does anyone remember the Stude that was entered in one of the "Cannon Ball Barker Sea To Shining Sea Trophy Dash" runs? It finished. As I remember, it was left in California after the race.
Mike M.

jclary
03-22-2016, 09:18 AM
You ask for it.
The car is owned by George Reitenour who resided in Portland, Indiana (Jay County) when he was active in the old car rallies back in the 1980s and 90's. He raced in at lest three of the cross country GAR rally's (I think more) plus a lot of other shorter rallies. His navigator for most of the contests was Alan Hadley of Noblesville, IN. Both George and Alan reside in Tennessee currently. The '36 Dictator coupe was restored by George from a nice original one-owner 58,000 mile car purchased in 1982 in Indianapolis. Its first GAR was in 1987. It has featured been in Turning Wheels, The Antique Studebaker Review as well as Cars & Parts magazine.

5247652477

Thanks for providing the pics. Seeing how easy it was for me to mess up the year of the car in my first post...you wouldn't want to see how bad I would do typing out George's last name using southern drawl phonetics.:rolleyes: Therefore, I waited to see your reply to get the correct spelling of "Reitenour."
Besides being a premier watch expert, George has been one of the best ambassadors of the Studebaker story!:!: I have had several encounters with him through the years. All of them very pleasant experiences. In fact, I'm probably one of the reasons he keeps his watches in a case with a lid on it. It keeps them safe from me drooling on them.;) I have a couple of Studebaker watches he serviced for me. Not only did he rescue them from being doomed to a "junk drawer relic" status, but he returned them in excellent working order along with the parts he replaced and an explanation of what & why.:)

I don't recall if I have ever read exactly how the genealogy gets from Studebaker to Reitenour...but I think George is a decedent of the Studebaker family.:) As in the spirit of our slogan, "STUDEBAKER, WE INVENTED COOL!" George and his Coupe is a front runner!:!: As we see in the comments posted from other members who assisted...he didn't do it all by himself, but welcomed others along for the ride.:!::):!: