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63avanti.
03-08-2016, 09:39 PM
Have a few questions regarding the 1963 Avanti. I know everyone has their own opinions so I'm looking for both input and answers....

In my search for a 63 avanti over the last few years my findings have been slim..

Is it worth the wait to continue my search for a driveable/show able avanti or should I dive into a project avanti which so many people say is a disaster waiting to happen?


What is the availability on 63 avanti parts? I found some on eBay and miscellaneous sites, but is there enough sources out there to restore an avanti?

Are there special tools needed when pulling the body from the frame on a car that has frame/torque box issues?

What does it cost to have the dash redone and why do so many people dread a cracked dash or having it replaced?


I know I can handle the mechanical end of the car, and I have a friend that runs a business and has the ability to do frame work but it would still leave me with interior, body/paint work to be sourced out.

I'm sure I'm not the only one that has these questions but just trying to gather more info on my end and clarify some points before I choose one way or the other.

StudeRich
03-08-2016, 09:57 PM
The consensus of opinion seems to be, that sure it is ALL very doable, the Parts and Pieces can be found but it's all about the outrageous, never to be recouped COST! $$$$$$$$$$$$$ :eek:

I believe that IF, you can find one done right, and to YOUR taste, it is MUCH cheaper. :!:

studegary
03-08-2016, 10:11 PM
Buy the best one that you can afford (unless you are just looking for a long term, expensive project).

edpjr
03-08-2016, 10:16 PM
Buy a rough condition Avanti and try to fix it up? Don't you do it!!! It's much better to buy a $35-40k '63-64 R2 in excellent condition and be done with it. If you buy a $10k Avanti, you'll spend $25-30K and lots of grief to make it into a nice car. Look for a nice low mileage '64 R2 with a 4-speed (rare) and pay thru the snout for it. You'll be glad you did.

StudeRich
03-08-2016, 10:32 PM
I believe Edwin (edpjr) has been there, done that, so should have some experience with a quickly dwindling Wallet!

HOWEVER, having said that... There is definitely a Lot to be said for doing the most you can yourself if you can.

karterfred88
03-08-2016, 11:00 PM
Depends on what you will be happy with. Do you just love the design? Or must it be the whole package, that is exactly as it was in 1963. Like any old car, the costs to make it "better than new" are high. Although I love mine, I have no desire to create a museum piece. I think every one seems to think it's more expensive to do an Avanti than a 57 Golden Hawk--not so--neither is doing a 63 split window corvette. It is easier to find the Vette parts, and when done you'll have a much higher value car. The relationship in cost, verses finished value isn't there on any restoration, and maybe less so on an Avanti. The real problem is the minimal suppliers left for Avanti only parts. Reproduction Avanti only parts are scarce and there really is too small a market to make them and not loose money. Putting new hog troughs on is as doable as putting them on a C/K or Lark, but at least the floors will be there. 63 round headlite parts are the hardest to find, the rest of the body parts pretty easy- new NOS, repro, used. Some of the interior chrome is hard to find, but as the saying goes, how much are you willing to spend for your desire, and how long do you want to wait. Right now you can find some for 10,15,20,25,30,40, even $50K drive it home and resell it for 1/2 what you paid! Your money, your choice.

Lou Van Anne
03-08-2016, 11:53 PM
It has to be a labor of love...you'll never get all your money back...been there, dune that! (But it's fun!)

Swifster
03-09-2016, 12:12 AM
No such thing as a cheap Avanti. Spend the money and get a nice one. By the way, the dash you can have rebuild at Just Dashes. Prepare to spend around $1250...

63t-cab
03-09-2016, 01:13 AM
Sounds like the best thing to do is this: take all the un - restored Avantis and PART THEM OUT ! if no One is supposed to spend to much Money on an Avanti,then how is One gonna find one already restored "so They don't have to be the One spending the Money,Who ever They is". I wonder how many here really do this for the love of Studebaker,or push a Pen,manipulate a Calculator for Investment purposes. I'm content being in this for the Fun Factor,and when the time comes to sell "if it comes to that" I've already come to terms that My Entertainment came with a Price.


Yours Truely,: THE STUDEBAKER INVESTMENT CLUB :yeahright:

packardHawk58
03-09-2016, 05:19 AM
Well said Joe!
As for the expense CHEAP Avanti, here is the one I bought last year for $7500, with 77.000 miles on it. 64 R2, auto.
All I am going to do is lift the body from the frame, recondition the running gear and put the body back on, it has a decent interior in it, the paint is fair. Should all be back on the road for under 25K all up. They say that an Avanti is expensive to restore, well try a Packard Hawk or a Golden. It all comes down to what you are happy with.
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_3124_zpsqeowolgt.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_3124_zpsqeowolgt.jpg.html)
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0648_zpsyjnxguir.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0648_zpsyjnxguir.jpg.html)
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0646_zps0dczxeng.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0646_zps0dczxeng.jpg.html)

64studeavanti
03-09-2016, 08:12 AM
I agree with karterfred and packardhawk. Avantis really do not cost much more to restore that any other car. If you are restoring, try to get one with all the parts present as that will cut down the time and expense chasing the hard to find pieces. FWIW, I have restored several Avantis and the most expensive one I have is a R1 4 spd that I have invested about $28,000 - including the $13,000 purchase. I have purchased several more rough Avantis for around $2,000 with less than $20,000 invested in the restoration effort. Keep in mind that I do all my own work, so labor is not included in the investment costs.

I am currently trying to restore a 56 GH and a 55 Speedster. Try coming out ahead on those!!!

If you want an Avanti, stay with the Stude versions. The Avanti IIs and later are worth about half as much; for no good reason as in many respects they are a much better car.

Gunslinger
03-09-2016, 08:18 AM
I, for one, believe that any Avanti that can be saved should be saved. I also know that makes no economic sense...the cost/benefit ratio is simply not there. I also recognize we need donor cars to keep other Avantis on the road.

We see and rebuild Avantis for the love of the car, not because we expect a financial reward down the road. It's sad...the Avanti has everything going for it...design pedigree, performance, timelessness, exclusivity...everything but value in the market.

ken-renda
03-09-2016, 09:00 AM
What you have seen in answer to your question is, for the most part, on target. I did a frame off restoration of a much abused 63 R2 4 speed but it had an interesting history and I am a Studebaker fan. It was a bad investment in dollars but a good investment in satisfaction at having something that represents a truly great car restored the way I want. Parts are hard to find and expensive and since completing my car, I understand that SI no longer has the replacement dash (it alone was $500, years ago) nor some of the side window seals. Economy of scale is a problem with Avanti reproduction parts. I would say buy one that is within your budget that does not require "restoration", but have an expert assure you that the frame, sub floor, supercharger, unique parts, and electrical grounding are things that you would not have to deal with. Ken, normally in Deltaville, Va


add glass to the things you "would not have to deal with", rubber gaskets are available but not sure about front and back glass to match original PPG.

karterfred88
03-09-2016, 09:23 AM
Well said Joe!
As for the expense CHEAP Avanti, here is the one I bought last year for $7500, with 77.000 miles on it. 64 R2, auto.
All I am going to do is lift the body from the frame, recondition the running gear and put the body back on, it has a decent interior in it, the paint is fair. Should all be back on the road for under 25K all up. They say that an Avanti is expensive to restore, well try a Packard Hawk or a Golden. It all comes down to what you are happy with.
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_3124_zpsqeowolgt.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_3124_zpsqeowolgt.jpg.html)
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0648_zpsyjnxguir.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0648_zpsyjnxguir.jpg.html)
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae194/packardhawk58/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0646_zps0dczxeng.jpg (http://s971.photobucket.com/user/packardhawk58/media/56%20Golden/64%20Avanti/IMG_0646_zps0dczxeng.jpg.html)
Nice find!! I spent twice as much for 1/2 as nice.

PackardV8
03-09-2016, 09:40 AM
Avanti are only expensive in the CASO context. Yes, some Avanti interior parts are somewhat expensive, but at least they're still available. Compared to many truly rare cars, the Avanti is just another '51-66 Stude, so most mechanical parts are thick on the ground and dirt-cheap. Since the Avanti is mechanically the same as most any Stude, it's agricultural in its simplicity and ease of disassembly and reassembly. Compare the cost of a rebuilt R1 engine with that of a '63 Jaguar XKE/Ferrari/Maserati/Lamborghini. If one wants a really nice Avanti, it can be restored to perfection for less than the entry price for any '63 Corvette or Jaguar XKE. Of course, it will still be less than the cost of that '63 Corvette or Jaguar XKE when it comes time to sell.

Bottom line - I'd never count up the cost of any hobby. If it's interesting and fun and one can afford it, don't look at the ROI. I've got a friend who's a retired and a golfer. Annually, he spends more than the cost of a restored Avanti on golfing trips to Hawaii, Scotland, Augusta, Pebble Beach and so on. What's he going to get back on the hobby cost when he goes to sell those?

jack vines

spokejr
03-09-2016, 09:54 AM
Doug, allow me to throw my two cents in on this.

Last spring I bought my first Avanti (63R2962), and I am ever so happy and proud of the car. Essentially a barn find but at least it had been stored in a closed garage with a dry concrete floor. It didn't start but was complete and all assembled. The hog troughs were as solid as can be as well as the frame. The paint was tired but showed signs of something that could be brought back. The interior was in great shape other than the front seats which need repair as the vinyl is failing at the seams. I paid $8,000.00.

So here's where I am at. I have rebuilt the powersteering system, radiator, carburetor. I have replaced all the hoses for cooling and braking as well as the tyres. I have pulled the fuel tank and boiled it out. When waiting on vendors for parts or the odd sub-let item (Dave Thiebuault for carb and distributor etc.) I kept the ball rolling cleaning the car and soaking the rubber seals to soften them and hopefully preserve them, Leatherique makes great stuff BTW. Be fiercly protective of the seals around the rear vent windows, unavailable and if found, massively pricey!

So far I am all in for about $12,000.00. The vast majority has been my work, the carb, distributor and brake work I hired others for. I might do some of the details differently but for the most part, I am glad I pulled the trigger to buy the car. It has worked because I enjoy working on cars and bikes and have done so for most of my life. Part of the success came though from looking at dozens of cars and skulking around this forum as well as the AOAI forum, researching as much as I can and listening to others who have been here before. It was a 3 year process to find my car and learn the pit falls that are unique to this breed.

There have been many setbacks along the way (man plans, God laughs). I had a clear plan on how to revive my car that pretty much was thrown out the window right from the start. The current curve ball is that at some point I have broken a piston ring so for now the car is laid up. The heart breaker is the engine block is the original, now there is a very deep groove in one cylinder and will need a sleeve in it so for the interim period I am on the prowl for a sound engine to transplant in and rebuild properly the original block.

So, here's my advise. If you are really skilled and find pleasure in sorting out problems, take on the car that needs work and have at it. If your background is mechanically weak or you become easily frustrated, find the best one possible. These cars are not impossible to work on, just different. For the most part, simple fractional wrenches are all you need but you may want to get some spare wrenches and be prepared to heat and bend them to better access the fasteners.

Good luck on your journey. The guys here are a great resource so don't be a stranger.

Ken Buchanan

sals54
03-09-2016, 10:40 AM
Here's another 2 cents worth. So that makes 4 cents, including the note above. Cheap advice so far.
Mine was purchased cheap. It came to me by accident, really. I was not in the market, but stumbled upon it on Craigslist. It was delivered to my door for under 5K. Its a 63 R1 automatic which runs. The reason I bought it was two fold. The undercarriage is spotless, no rust anywhere as its a California car from its birth. The interior was redone at some point in its history and the dash looks a bit sad. Now for the downside. It has a Chevy engine/trans in it. I'm not entirely put off by this so long as it runs and drives for now. Its paint is homely, but again, I'm not terribly concerned about that either. For now, I'm rather enjoying the patina'd look of it.
Anyhoo... My point is that I was probably never going to find and buy a very nice Avanti. I love them, but not enough to spend a bunch of money on one. I don't like being on the losing end of a car deal. My Avanti could be parted out for triple what I paid for it, or could be put back to Stude drivetrain for a couple grand. I'm loving the "driver" quality of it and will enjoy driving it as-is.
I suppose I have to take up with most of the advice already given. So it falls to you and what you want in the bargain. Do you want a very nice car to show and drive now? Or do you want to spend double and build it yourself? If you can live with some blemishes, then buy a decent running car and fix it as you go. If not, then start with the nicest one you can find. Either way its going to cost you.
Well, that was a bit of a rambling tome. So much for keeping it to just 2 cents. See what Avantis can do to your budget? Even 2 cents of advice can run into 2 bits worth.

edpjr
03-09-2016, 10:49 AM
Aye. Aye. The body work and paint job alone cost me a small fortune. I needed ALL bright parts replaced exterior, interior and under the hood. The interior work was over $4k with some work still to be done. New exhausts, 2-3 Carb rebuilds, new dual master cyl, electronic ignition, S/C Rebuild, power windows fixed, leaks, all rubber, rechrome bumpers, tires... and on and on and on... I've spent countless thousands of $$$ with Stude Intl, Mr. Myer, Mr. Thibeau and others. If my brother weren't a trained mechanic, I'd be in the poor house. On my best day, I couldn't recover half my investment if I sold my car. Yeesh!


I believe Edwin (edpjr) has been there, done that, so should have some experience with a quickly dwindling Wallet!

HOWEVER, having said that... There is definitely a Lot to be said for doing the most you can yourself if you can.

DEEPNHOCK
03-09-2016, 11:39 AM
(opinion)

If you enjoy the process of working on the machine, then restoring one is a possibility.
If your lifespan is at a point where you have the time (months/years), then restoring one is a possibility.
If your lifespan is not that long, then financing one, and paying it off over time gives you the ability to own one and enjoy it.
If your talent level is not high enough, then buying a finished one is your best bet.
If your financial position does not allow you to buy or finance one, then restoring one over time (out of your pocket) is a possibility.
There is an advantage in financing one, and driving it while paying it off. Enjoyment level is sometimes higher at a show than in the shop.
If you are a millenial..You want one now, you can't afford one, you can't finance one, and you don't have a drivers license..so forget about it.

qsanford
03-09-2016, 11:42 AM
You can't buy much of a new car for the money being discussed here. I think the entry level Mini is about $21,000!

paintim613
03-09-2016, 11:45 AM
I waited until I found a totally restored '63 R1 for sale and am glad I did. After restoring our '53 custom (pics in signature link) for big bucks we vowed never again.

sweetolbob
03-09-2016, 12:30 PM
Before you make a decision on what/if to buy, talk to your local body shop about the paint job you want. Almost any cheap/inexpensive Avanti will need a repaint and that's where the big bucks really come into play. If it needs a repaint, then the odds are it needs to be taken to bare fiberglass. That means all the glass out, new seals, etc. There are not many shortcuts here. So approaching 5-figures can be expected.

I deal with those issues because I've had a painter that does mine inexpensively until my 74 when he was to busy to do it. I scraped the body bare, primed, sanded and painted. You don't want to know the hours involved.

Personally, if I were in your shoes and I am kinda, I'd go with a later model with the GM drivetrain. When I repainted, the side lights came off, as well as the goofy bumper and grill setup. Pretty hard to tell from a 63/64 square light and much better and inexpensive parts to locate.

At the local shows, nobody knows the difference but then they wouldn't if I left later stuff on.

Tell me the year from this view.

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh263/sweetolbob/74%20paint/IMG_20150827_180352_zps7qodnq7h.jpg

Point is: if you really want a 63 and can't paint, buy the best you can find in the condition you want to drive it in. If you want to do the work yourself, consider a later model. Generally less expensive to buy and overall, less expensive to find mechanical parts for. Don't get me wrong, there's still plenty of the old Stude in it to keep your interest much like the originals.

Bob

plwindish
03-09-2016, 01:10 PM
Unless you are a grease and dirt under the fingernails type of person that loves to work on cars for hours on end, stay away from projects. If you have the time, talent and treasure to bring one back, then more power to you! 5 years ago I bought a 76 in reasonably good shape, but have put a small fortune in having it gone through, rebuilding some things(motor, suspension), replacing other things(trans, brake system, gauges) and finally repainting. I did very little of the work as I didn't have the facilities, time or talent to do the work.The car is now at the level where I can travel with it, driving to Avanti and Studebaker Meets in CO, DE, MN, MO, PA, WI and traveling Rte 66 to CA. Would I do that again? Probably not. I acquired an 89 convertible 2 years ago, but it had been resto - modded with a different motor, trans, rear end and wheels. What work has been done on the car is more maintaining it and making it more highway friendly for longer trips. I plan to enjoy both cars as long as health allows me to. Unless one has the talent and time to undertake a restoration project, I would recommend following the other's advice about buying a nice one that someone else has put the time and money into getting the car up to a high standard. Let's face it, a restored Avanti is much more reasonable than other "popular" brands that we see bringing big bucks at the auctions.

Hallabutt
03-09-2016, 02:48 PM
Almost fifty years ago I bought my first Avanti, a 40K mile original. It was where most of us Stude people wanted because we loved it for what we perceived as the best that Studebaker had produced. Using as daily transportation for my last two years of college, and several cross country trips dulled my enthusiasm for the car. I'm not saying that it ever stopped being one of the most beautiful and unique cars ever produced, but having to drive one summer and winter takes the edge off quickly. For about the same price as I paid for the Avanti I looked at a nice 1967 Jaguar drop head (convertible/roadster) but chose the Avanti instead! Oh the tribulation of falling in love with Studebaker!

The phenomenal survival rate of the Studebaker Avanti, and the fact of the multiple incarnations of the design, has created a condition that there are more really good cars out there then their are buyers. The patient selective buyer will find a number of suitable choices at prices that are a relative bargain in the collector car market. More power to the man who makes the effort at saving and restoring one, but it has to be a real labor of love! When I was younger I restored a number of cars because of sentiment, or that I plain just wanted to do them. Since I have been accused of never selling anything, it shouldn't be any surprise that I still own all of them. The satisfaction of restoring something is unmatched, but again do it because you want to, because you really have choices that are simpler and more cost effective.

I still own the 1964 Avanti, but it has been off the road for about forty years. I have other cars more rare and special that need my attention, so I'm considering giving it to my nephew. He is the best mechanic that I know, and has helped me a great deal, and he likes the car. Maybe this can be my contribution to bringing someone young the Studebaker family.

dleroux
03-09-2016, 03:04 PM
Here's what I started with:
http://arizonacollectorcars.com/detail.php?vid=553&q=current
I'm 20 months into it and it's now driveable. Just about everything has been done, except a re-paint. There are a "few" blemishes that one expert says he can work out. We'll see. This was the best I could find & still everything mechanically has been done. This was actually choice #2. I was looking for a '65 Riveriea GS which kept getting further away $$ wise. The Avanti was my wife's choice so with her on board, half the battle is won, right? No one source will have all the parts. Get to know the SI catalog and contact / get to know Dave Thibeault, Dan Booth, Studebaker Rich, John Brissette, Jon Meyer. All have been extremely helpful and their knowledge is indispensable. As far as the interior, ( I did mine in leather) I'm sure there is a local shop that could do a decent job. It's worth going to a classic auto dealer & finding out who they use for various aspects of their restorations. Rarely does one dealer do everything, they sub out many items, and most are willing to let you know who they use. Is it worth the investment? Only you can answer that. As far as my choice, as I proudly point out the difference between a II and a '63 or '64, there are ten letters on my trunk that have made it worthwhile to me. If you want to go further into this, PM me & I'll gladly go over what I've come across, however I can't give a big enough shout-out to the forum. This is an extremely helpful source of information and those who participate are always more than willing to lend their advice & words of wisdom.

mapman
03-09-2016, 03:56 PM
I like doing the work on all my cars. I bought a $1200 '63 Avanti in 1986 when I had 3 kids under 4. I flat towed it from Anchorage Alaska to Idaho and moved my family with it. Now 5 kids. I coached, I was Cubmaster, I have no idea how many soccer baseball and basketball games I watched. I served on many Boy Scout boards and the car waited as life went on. I got another engine and transmission and got the drivetrain together, finally getting it running in 2006. I continue to work on it as time allows but last year I was fortunate enough to find a '64 that had been used as basically a museum piece for maybe 20 years. It had been restored and the owner was selling off all his old cars. This was his last. It ran and looked fantastic but needed to be brought back to drivable condition. I cleaned the radiator, repaired a voltage regulator and wired it back to correct configuration. Of coarse the brakes needed attention and the power steering hoses were incorrect. The battery box needed repair and everything needed lubing. It is a very nice car and my wife now drives it whenever she needs it. Some things are incorrect and the AC doesn't work yet. We now feel comfortable driving it anywhere. Meanwhile the '63 is still coming along and my grandkids love my old cars. I have also restored several others and have more in the wings. I love this hobby. That's what it's about for me. You have to decide what it's about for you but I would buy that same cheap Avanti again.
Rob

Colgate Studebaker
03-09-2016, 04:07 PM
I restored my brothers 63 R2 4 speed that he has owned since 1978. It took me 5 1/2 years working on it in my spare time, and the only thing I farmed out was the paint. The paint was very generously done by a friend of my son, a professional body/paint guy, and he charged $4500 for the entire job, which is perfect. I repaired the frame rust, having it and all the suspension parts powder coated. Every bushing, seal, shim, nut and bolt was either restored or replaced. The engine and drive train were completely rebuilt or replaced with new parts. I reupholstered the interior top to bottom, the first time I've ever done it, and it looks perfect. Patting myself on the back here. Every piece of chrome, and I mean every piece on the entire car, was rechromed. New trim pieces were bought that I couldn't repair/restore. Forgot to mention the torque boxes needed replacing, not a difficult project to do actually. After the car was finished, my brother had lost his left leg during the rebuild, he had great difficulty driving the 4 speed, so I replaced it with a power shift, and added power steering to help him maneuver the car. I do not know the exact figure my brother has ended up investing in the restoration, but I believe it to be in the neighborhood of $29,000. Why did he do it? He has LOVED that car and if he could, I am sure he'd like to be buried in it when he kicks the bucket. He has gotten his moneys worth out of it several times over. Simple as that, and me, I really enjoyed doing it, nothing else. Bill

DMB-8
03-09-2016, 04:49 PM
I have a 63 r1 automatic avanti that I did a frame off restoration on.The car was a California car originally there was no rust on frame or hog troughs .I sandblasted the frame and painted it with por 15.I rebuilt the engine and had the transmission rebuilt.I stripped all the paint and repainted with base clear coat
it is avanti red with a black interior in very nice shape.It needs a few things but is a very nice drive able car with minor work that needs done.AC compressor valves would not hold and need replaced as I could not charge the air and a couple other things that I can discuss with you, all chrome has been redone and is very good.I have 8 cars that I have restored and need to sell some as my age is becoming a problem.Call me and I will tell you anything about the car.I can send pictures if you are interested.I am at the York swap meet right now as I am a vendor. I would like about$20,000 for the car.My phone #is 724-651-9320
My name is Don Borger and the car is in New Castle,Pa.Thank You,Don

63 R2 Hawk
03-09-2016, 04:51 PM
Another $0.02USD. I would make a safe, fun driver out of it and just upgrade & maintain things as you go. I've been driving my GT Hawk, the one I bought to restore, for over 10 years now and I decided it's not going to get restored, at least not on my watch. I'm 72 and no longer have the patience, energy, time or a big sack of money laying around to start a resto project. It turns as many heads and gets lots of questions just the way it is, and I'm not afraid to drive it and get a few dings on it. Besides, it's fun and it requires you to be involved and aware when driving it, unlike a nanny car.

wise raymond
03-10-2016, 11:04 AM
Restore,, drive,restore, drive,, restore, drive ,,just my two cents Worth. R

Xcalibur
03-10-2016, 06:10 PM
As suggested, I agree, you will ALWAYS be ahead waiting to buy the best you can find and afford. Some of your questions lead me to suspect you have never restored a car before and if so, CERTAINLY buy something you can enjoy right away... unless you are just looking for a project!

63avanti.
03-13-2016, 12:16 AM
Thanks everyone for all the input and opinions. Being able to read about other people putting forth the effort to restore one is great.

My main reason for starting the thread was to hear just that along with the availability of parts to finish a project. I have never fully restored a car before but don't mind a challenge. I have been a mechanic for 8 years now and have a little experience in body work and welding as well.

All in all I will just keep my options open and see what comes up for sale over the next year or so and make it a priority to own a 63.

DEEPNHOCK
03-13-2016, 06:42 AM
That's cool, Doug...
And you just never know...
You putting your thread out there might just be shown to an owner of a '63 that might be ready to part with it....to the right enthusiastic buyer.
Good luck with your quest!:!!:



Thanks everyone for all the input and opinions. Being able to read about other people putting forth the effort to restore one is great.

My main reason for starting the thread was to hear just that along with the availability of parts to finish a project. I have never fully restored a car before but don't mind a challenge. I have been a mechanic for 8 years now and have a little experience in body work and welding as well.

All in all I will just keep my options open and see what comes up for sale over the next year or so and make it a priority to own a 63.

JLB
03-13-2016, 10:47 AM
Here's what I started with:
http://arizonacollectorcars.com/detail.php?vid=553&q=current
I'm 20 months into it and it's now driveable. Just about everything has been done, except a re-paint. There are a "few" blemishes that one expert says he can work out. We'll see. This was the best I could find & still everything mechanically has been done. This was actually choice #2. I was looking for a '65 Riveriea GS which kept getting further away $$ wise. The Avanti was my wife's choice so with her on board, half the battle is won, right? No one source will have all the parts. Get to know the SI catalog and contact / get to know Dave Thibeault, Dan Booth, Studebaker Rich, John Brissette, Jon Meyer. All have been extremely helpful and their knowledge is indispensable. As far as the interior, ( I did mine in leather) I'm sure there is a local shop that could do a decent job. It's worth going to a classic auto dealer & finding out who they use for various aspects of their restorations. Rarely does one dealer do everything, they sub out many items, and most are willing to let you know who they use. Is it worth the investment? Only you can answer that. As far as my choice, as I proudly point out the difference between a II and a '63 or '64, there are ten letters on my trunk that have made it worthwhile to me. If you want to go further into this, PM me & I'll gladly go over what I've come across, however I can't give a big enough shout-out to the forum. This is an extremely helpful source of information and those who participate are always more than willing to lend their advice & words of wisdom.
Dick.........nice of you to give me a mention in your post, but I truly do not meet the qualifications that the others you mentioned have. They are experts, I on the other hand am a shade tree mechanic at best.
John

dleroux
03-13-2016, 12:37 PM
John, don't underestimate yourself. You've helped me a great deal. You've supplied NOS parts no one else had and made recommendations That I've incorporated. Not quite done, don't know if I ever will be, but that's part of the process in bringing back a 53 year old Studebaker.

dleroux
03-13-2016, 12:40 PM
Doug,
checkout
63 R-1 Avanti For Sale NJ that was posted today