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View Full Version : What do you guys think of this valley cover?



evilhawk
03-05-2016, 05:02 AM
I am tossing around the idea of purchasing one of these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HOT-ROD-STUDEBAKER-ALL-V-8s-259-289-FINNED-VALLEY-COVER-RAT-/361363800282?hash=item5422f600da:g:38EAAOSwPcVVzOnF&vxp=mtr

But I noticed it doesnt have the PCV valve? Will this work or would I need to figure out a different place to put the PCV?

Dan White
03-05-2016, 05:35 AM
This is from Vintage Speed. He repros and makes a lot of unique vintage speed parts, including 3X2 to 4bbl intake adapters, Edmunds air cleaners, etc. I put one of his early air cleaners on a vintage I8 Buick and it was well done. Prices are reasonable.

http://vintagespeed.com

64studeavanti
03-05-2016, 07:02 AM
It would work well on an R1.

DEEPNHOCK
03-05-2016, 07:15 AM
It is sort of generic.
Missing the center bolt.
Needs machining for a draft tube or pcv adapter.
The bottom is flat, with a cast surface.
There is no relief in the center, so certain intake manifolds will hit the fins.
The casting surface is a bit rough, so oil, dirt, and Studegoo will cover it and be hard to clean off.
It will always look dirty.

So... If you don't mind reworking it a bit, it would be cool.

Milaca
03-05-2016, 12:09 PM
Paint your existing valley cover silver, and call it good. :)

SN-60
03-05-2016, 12:44 PM
It is sort of generic.
Missing the center bolt.
Needs machining for a draft tube or pcv adapter.
The bottom is flat, with a cast surface.
There is no relief in the center, so certain intake manifolds will hit the fins.
The casting surface is a bit rough, so oil, dirt, and Studegoo will cover it and be hard to clean off.
It will always look dirty.

So... If you don't mind reworking it a bit, it would be cool.

Sounds to me like Jeff will be marketing one of his own soon!! :rolleyes:

Anyway, this valley cover looks to be a real nice update for a Stude V8 at a reasonable price,.....Go for it! :!:

StudeRich
03-05-2016, 01:23 PM
I guess it depends on the "Look" you are trying to accomplish.
If you like the "Overdone" look like those that Chrome everything, that's fine but I think Ribbed Valve Covers are enough, a Ribbed Oil Filler Pipe block-off Plate is available even Ribbed Air Cleaners and these Lifter Covers, but why overdo it?

The last time this came up here, I said who is going to wipe and hose down all those Ribs every 3 Months to keep it looking Good?

No one agreed at the time that they are overkill and silly. :( Take your best guess.

But poor fit, no baffled Crankcase Breather passage, no hole for PCV or draft tube, no center Bolt hole etc. are considerations.

SN-60
03-05-2016, 02:00 PM
Points well taken Rich, but if you take another look at his ad, it sounds like he's already anticipated the need for various setups/attachments, and will work with the buyer on that. (no doubt for an extra charge, of course!)

52-fan
03-05-2016, 04:13 PM
My brother has had a finned valley cover on his engine for years. (I don't know where he got it.) What you can see of it looks nice, but he said if he had known how little of it would show, he wouldn't have gotten it. Stiil, I think one would look nice with finned valve covers.

Lamar
03-05-2016, 05:32 PM
But it is finned aluminum it should add at least 25 horse power.

Before everyone get there nickers in a twist that was said with tongue planted firmly in cheek!

Kato
03-06-2016, 08:41 AM
My brother has had a finned valley cover on his engine for years. (I don't know where he got it.) What you can see of it looks nice, but he said if he had known how little of it would show, he wouldn't have gotten it. Stiil, I think one would look nice with finned valve covers.

Here's a pic of my 62GT with the finned valve and valley cover. You can decide for yourself if it's visibility is worth it. There are breathers available to "complete" the look if you want more bling. This was on the car when I bought it so not sure where it came from.

52043

DEEPNHOCK
03-06-2016, 08:53 AM
Back from 2010:
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?33293-Vintage-speed-valley-cover

And a tech piece about the SI finned cover back in the day:
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?3413-Baffling-A-Finned-Valley-Cover

http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l11/studemaker/Mergatroid%20Projects/11.jpg

And a thread showing the engine that Dick Steinkamp put together.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?29359-Finned-valley-covers

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/Ute%20eBay/pics007.jpg

StudeRich
03-06-2016, 01:22 PM
No idea why that second photo showed up... that's not my car.. sorry!

That "Attachment Photo" is in your "Attachments" Folder on the Forum, you get to it from the "Go Advanced Mode" down at the bottom, you can delete any old Photos you added by mistake or whatever, by using the "X" at the Upper Right of each Photo.

"Attachments" are not the same as actual added to a Post Type Photos, and they always display at the bottom of your Post as this one did.

Kato
03-06-2016, 07:00 PM
That "Attachment Photo" is in your "Attachments" Folder on the Forum, you get to it from the "Go Advanced Mode" down at the bottom, you can delete any old Photos you added by mistake or whatever, by using the "X" at the Upper Right of each Photo.

"Attachments" are not the same as actual added to a Post Type Photos, and they always display at the bottom of your Post as this one did.

That worked like a charm.. thanks.. Still not sure how I posted that in the first place but I now know how to get rid of it.

The dressed up 289 looks great but first thing I am going to do is see if the valley cover on my GT was modified for the PCV. I have my doubts! What are the draw backs of not having the PCV if it isn't installed?

SN-60
03-06-2016, 07:04 PM
Steinkamp's Stude engine really is a honey...isn't it? :!!:

52-fan
03-06-2016, 07:19 PM
That worked like a charm.. thanks.. Still not sure how I posted that in the first place but I now know how to get rid of it.

The dressed up 289 looks great but first thing I am going to do is see if the valley cover on my GT was modified for the PCV. I have my doubts! What are the draw backs of not having the PCV if it isn't installed?

I believe that, unless your 62 was sold in California, it would have come with a road draft tube. Of course, either the road draft tube or the PCV will work.
One thing you might consider. I notice that, in a GT with the radiator shroud, the valley cover is hard to see. They show more in the trucks and some other cars.

Kato
03-06-2016, 10:52 PM
I believe that, unless your 62 was sold in California, it would have come with a road draft tube. Of course, either the road draft tube or the PCV will work.
One thing you might consider. I notice that, in a GT with the radiator shroud, the valley cover is hard to see. They show more in the trucks and some other cars.

I am new to Studes and only got the car last August so I am still learning. I did see what is likely the road draft tube. Just got the production order so I know the car was sold new in Texas. I believe the tube was visible to the right and rear of the engine. There appeared to be a small amount of oil coming out of it. I assume that is the road draft tube?

DEEPNHOCK
03-07-2016, 06:51 AM
That particular time was when pollution controls were being implemented and Studebaker was phasing out of auto production.
(and I am sure that upcoming pollution control laws were one of the issues that caused the Studebaker board of directors to decide to get out of auto manufacturing)
PCV systems were brand new, and in most cases, they were supplied by aftermarket parts companies like AC-Delco.
They were mostly bolt on kits. You see the kits around from time to time on places like Ebay.
But... To address your original question...

There are two types of PCV 'systems'. One style is an 'open' system, and another style is a 'closed' system.
The purpose of the system is to 'burn' the unwanted polluted air in the crankcase to clean up any emissions that might emanate out the breather caps.

An 'open' system just draws crankcase fumes out of the crankcase by using manifold vacuum and a check valve (pcv valve).
Outside air just goes into the crankcase via the breather caps, of combustion gas getting past the piston rings.

A 'closed' system operates the same way, but there are no 'breather caps'. There is a small air inlet in the air intake system (usually inside the air cleaner housing)
This allows 'filtered' air to go into the crankcase from the atmosphere and then, after it is polluted by combustion gas that gets past the piston rings, going into the intake manifold and get burned in the combustion process.

A closed system is more efficient, and later replaced the open system.
Personally, I prefer a closed system, as it keeps the exterior of the engine cleaner.
But you have to replace the vented caps with sealed caps (or seal them up yourself) and add the additional plumbing to your air cleaner.
Of course, your road draft tube has to be modified, or replaced with the Stude PCV adapter.
An open system just required the valley pan adapter and running a PCV line and valve to the correct vacuum source port.




I am new to Studes and only got the car last August so I am still learning. I did see what is likely the road draft tube. Just got the production order so I know the car was sold new in Texas. I believe the tube was visible to the right and rear of the engine. There appeared to be a small amount of oil coming out of it. I assume that is the road draft tube?

Skip Lackie
03-07-2016, 07:58 AM
I am new to Studes and only got the car last August so I am still learning. I did see what is likely the road draft tube. Just got the production order so I know the car was sold new in Texas. I believe the tube was visible to the right and rear of the engine. There appeared to be a small amount of oil coming out of it. I assume that is the road draft tube?

Yes, that's the road draft tube. To add to what Jeff and 52Fan said, a PCV system can keep the engine (and the air) cleaner, but would not have been installed by the factory on your 62 unless it was sold new in California. That said, some states (and provinces?) later required the installation of PCVs on vehicles that flunked emissions tests. This program has pretty well stopped, as most vehicles from that era now qualify for historic plates, and are generally exempt from inspection. But it does explain why some pre-63 Studes are sometimes found to have a PCV system installed.

Kato
03-07-2016, 10:00 AM
That particular time was when pollution controls were being implemented and Studebaker was phasing out of auto production.
(and I am sure that upcoming pollution control laws were one of the issues that caused the Studebaker board of directors to decide to get out of auto manufacturing)
PCV systems were brand new, and in most cases, they were supplied by aftermarket parts companies like AC-Delco.
They were mostly bolt on kits. You see the kits around from time to time on places like Ebay.
But... To address your original question...

There are two types of PCV 'systems'. One style is an 'open' system, and another style is a 'closed' system.
The purpose of the system is to 'burn' the unwanted polluted air in the crankcase to clean up any emissions that might emanate out the breather caps.

An 'open' system just draws crankcase fumes out of the crankcase by using manifold vacuum and a check valve (pcv valve).
Outside air just goes into the crankcase via the breather caps, of combustion gas getting past the piston rings.

A 'closed' system operates the same way, but there are no 'breather caps'. There is a small air inlet in the air intake system (usually inside the air cleaner housing)
This allows 'filtered' air to go into the crankcase from the atmosphere and then, after it is polluted by combustion gas that gets past the piston rings, going into the intake manifold and get burned in the combustion process.

A closed system is more efficient, and later replaced the open system.
Personally, I prefer a closed system, as it keeps the exterior of the engine cleaner.
But you have to replace the vented caps with sealed caps (or seal them up yourself) and add the additional plumbing to your air cleaner.
Of course, your road draft tube has to be modified, or replaced with the Stude PCV adapter.
An open system just required the valley pan adapter and running a PCV line and valve to the correct vacuum source port.


Yes, that's the road draft tube. To add to what Jeff and 52Fan said, a PCV system can keep the engine (and the air) cleaner, but would not have been installed by the factory on your 62 unless it was sold new in California. That said, some states (and provinces?) later required the installation of PCVs on vehicles that flunked emissions tests. This program has pretty well stopped, as most vehicles from that era now qualify for historic plates, and are generally exempt from inspection. But it does explain why some pre-63 Studes are sometimes found to have a PCV system installed.

Thanks very much Gents.. I had a general idea of the function of the PCV system but this certainly clears everything up. As I said I am new to the car and Studes in general. The car does leak some oil but I think at least some of this oil is coming from the road draft tube so perhaps converting to a closed system might be in order at some point. I'll admit I had no idea what that tube was so you have cleared this up for me nicely. In my younger days I was a Ford guy and I recall the PCV valve being in the valve cover. Were Stude PCVs always in the valley cover? Cars beyond a certain age are exempt from emission requirements here in Ontario so there is no requirement to install a closed system, might just help keep the exterior of the engine cleaner and that is worthwhile.

DEEPNHOCK
03-07-2016, 11:13 AM
Something to check out (before spending any hard earned money)*note
The road draft tube should have a cotter pin stuck through the center of the tube about 5" up from the bottom end.
Just above that cotter pin should be a slug of wire mesh.
If that is all gooped up (or blocked by mud daubers) it could cause the oil to puddle up and drip off.
In a perfect world, only vapors should come out.
The tapered end is supposed to siphon off those vapors at road speed.
If your mesh is gone, or rusted, you can substitute a chunk of pot scrubber (I like stainless steel).
HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

*note: Your first and best purchase should be a service manual....



<snip>
The car does leak some oil but I think at least some of this oil is coming from the road draft tube so perhaps converting to a closed system might be in order at some point.<snip>

Kato
03-07-2016, 06:50 PM
Something to check out (before spending any hard earned money)*note
The road draft tube should have a cotter pin stuck through the center of the tube about 5" up from the bottom end.
Just above that cotter pin should be a slug of wire mesh.
If that is all gooped up (or blocked by mud daubers) it could cause the oil to puddle up and drip off.
In a perfect world, only vapors should come out.
The tapered end is supposed to siphon off those vapors at road speed.
If your mesh is gone, or rusted, you can substitute a chunk of pot scrubber (I like stainless steel).
HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

*note: Your first and best purchase should be a service manual....

Outstanding! I will definitely look into this. And yes I have the service manuals now, all of them, now I just need my GT out of storage. Hurry up Spring! Thanks again!